Reading and Writing Quarterly (Read Writ Q )

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Description

Reading and Writing Quarterly provides direction in educating a mainstreamed population for literacy. It disseminates critical information to improve instruction for regular and special education students who have difficulty learning to read and write. Interdisciplinary in scope, the journal addresses the causes, prevention, evaluation, and remediation of reading and writing difficulties in regular and special education settings. It encourages manuscripts on teaching the reading and writing processes to students experiencing difficulties in these areas. Possible topics include adjustments for language-learning style, literature-based reading programs, teaching reading and writing in the mainstream, study strategies, language-centered computer curricula, oral language connections to literacy, cooperative learning approaches to reading and writing, direct instruction, curriculum-based assessment, the impact of environmental factors on instructional effectiveness, and improvement of self-esteem.

  • Impact factor
    0.00
  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
    0.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.00
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.00
  • Website
    Reading & Writing Quarterly website
  • Other titles
    Reading & writing quarterly (Online), Reading & writing quarterly
  • ISSN
    1057-3569
  • OCLC
    41180984
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • On author's personal website or departmental website immediately
    • On institutional repository or subject-based repository after either 12 months embargo for STM, Behavioural Science and Public Health Journals or 18 months embargo for SSH journals
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • The publisher will deposit in on behalf of authors to a designated institutional repository including PubMed Central, where a deposit agreement exists with the repository
    • STM: Science, Technology and Medicine
    • SSH: Social Science and Humanities
    • Publisher last contacted on 25/03/2014
    • 'Taylor & Francis (Psychology Press)' is an imprint of 'Taylor & Francis'
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In this article, we discuss the Informal Reading-ThinkingInventory (IR-TI), an informal reading inventory built on an easily recognized legacy model that also branches out into new realms. The IR-TI provides tools for assessing reading the lines, reading between the lines, and reading beyond the lines. This is a 21st-century assessment instrument that reaches out to track critical aspects of social and cognitive development. The IR-TI includes innovative prompts for gathering data on schema activation, personal-emotional responding, elaborative thinking, engagement, metacognition, and response to text writing. The optional IR-TI tasks shed light on overlooked student strengths as well as student needs. The instrument urges fresh thinking as it points out unexpected strengths in weaker readers and weakness in seemingly proficient readers. Seeming outlier findings such as these stimulate new knowledge as they challenge popular but ambiguous theories and practices.
    Reading and Writing Quarterly 07/2013;
  • Reading and Writing Quarterly 07/2013; 29(3).
  • Reading and Writing Quarterly 01/2013; 29(2).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Over time, criticisms related to the technical rigor of informal reading inventories (IRIs) have led many to question using these assessment instruments for high- or low-stakes purposes. In this article, I examine reliability evidence reported in 11 new and updated IRIs and make comparisons with Spector's earlier analysis that revealed fewer than half of the IRIs reported reliability. Based on the findings, I discuss ways in which IRIs have changed and use criteria recommended by Nitko, Salvia and Ysseldyke, and Spector to consider various educational uses of IRI data.
    Reading and Writing Quarterly 01/2013; 29(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The purposes of the study we describe here were (a) to identify the challenges that English Language Learner and non–English Language Learner high school students in an urban public school district experience when composing in the genre of exposition, a genre considered to be central to advanced academic literacy; and (b) to relate these challenges to characteristics of the writing they produce. We present a descriptive inventory of the challenges these adolescents faced when composing in the genre of exposition and also compare the challenges that the 2 groups experienced both in relation to each other and in relation to characteristics of the writing they produced. Finally, we relate our findings to implications for improving writing instruction and assessment for adolescents.
    Reading and Writing Quarterly 01/2013; 29(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Vocabulary instruction provided within a response-to-intervention (RTI) framework has great potential for supporting the vocabulary development of all students, including those who are most at risk for language and literacy difficulties. The majority of research on RTI has focused on code-based literacy skills such as phonemic awareness and decoding. We believe, however, that a multi-tier approach to vocabulary instruction has great potential for supporting the vocabulary development of all students, including those who are most at risk for language and literacy difficulties. In this article we discuss vocabulary acquisition and the challenges that educators face with providing vocabulary instruction in schools, describe a series of research studies supporting direct vocabulary instruction within an RTI approach, and provide suggestions for future research.
    Reading and Writing Quarterly 01/2013; 29(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: There are ample research and position papers advocating response-to-intervention (RTI) frameworks to address the academic struggles of students identified as English language learners (ELLs) and to prevent inequitable outcomes such as overrepresentation in special education. However, some scholars have questioned how RTI is conceptualized and implemented with ELLs. This systematic literature review explores how the existing research on RTI for ELLs has addressed (a) the quality and appropriateness of Tier 1 practices for ELLs and (b) linguistic factors as contexts that impact this quality. A key finding is that current research is not sufficiently linked to general education instruction. Thus, we suggest that future RTI research address instruction for ELLs in general education settings, including the incorporation of Title I supports, bilingual education and language acquisition programs, and culturally responsive pedagogy into Tier 1 universal interventions.
    Reading and Writing Quarterly 01/2013; 29(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study examined how effectively candidates in an MSEd in literacy education with a focus on reading program used the results from the Basic Reading Inventory to develop key instructional recommendations. The results indicated that, overall, candidates made about two thirds of the key recommendations suggested by an expert in the area of reading and reading assessment. Candidates needed to increase the specificity of strategies related to the recommendations and to decrease the number of low-priority recommendations. This article delineates suggestions regarding how teacher educators can help their candidates improve the quality and specificity of recommendations.
    Reading and Writing Quarterly 01/2013; 29(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: With the increasing amount of testing taking place in classrooms, teachers may question how appropriate those assessments are for the growing numbers of English language learners (ELLs) in the United States. One of the assessment options for classroom teachers is the informal reading inventory (IRI), which is the most frequently used assessment tool for all students. Because of disagreement regarding the reliability and validity of IRIs for use with native English speakers, teachers should exercise greater caution when using them with ELLs, both in choosing the specific IRI and in interpreting the results based on the influence of students' accents on word pronunciations, familiarity with culturally specific content, the kinds of questions asked, and the relevance to classroom instruction and to students' culture. In addition, teachers should evaluate students' reading ability using several measures rather than a single assessment. Other informal assessments are available for use with ELLs.
    Reading and Writing Quarterly 01/2013; 29(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Reading engagement has been found to be a predictor of reading comprehension and reading achievement in English monolingual students across the elementary grades. However, researchers have not yet explored this relationship with English language learners (ELLs). The purpose of this study was to understand the role of ELLs' reading engagement in both their general and content-specific reading comprehension. We used the construct of reading engagement to determine whether engagement mediated the relationship between ELLs' English language proficiency and general reading comprehension and the relationship between content-specific (science) academic vocabulary and content area (science) reading comprehension. For both 5th-grade Asian ELLs and 6th-grade Hispanic ELLs, reading engagement mediated the relationship between English language proficiency and general comprehension and the relationship between science vocabulary and science comprehension. Taken together, these findings suggest that reading engagement functions as an explanatory mechanism between language proficiency and comprehension in early adolescent ELLs. We discuss the implications of these findings for reading engagement in late elementary and middle school.
    Reading and Writing Quarterly 01/2013; 29(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In this article, we describe our research involving the administration of the Critical Reading Inventory–2 (CRI–2), an informal reading inventory that places special emphasis on thoughtful response to text and higher level thinking. We administered the CRI–2 to a group of students to obtain diagnostic data for guiding instruction. The data for this case study indicated that 1 student was strong in text-based comprehension but was clearly struggling with higher level comprehension. Intervention strategies incorporated guided instruction emphasizing themes and character traits. The student also participated in collaborative follow-up activities that included modifications of Question the Author and Discussion Webs. Both of these activities required the use of story information to support the positions that students took in response to the higher level questions. After the completion of the instruction, students completed posttests using the CRI–2. We share the results and discuss the implications for teachers.
    Reading and Writing Quarterly 01/2013; 29(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We investigated 2 curriculum-based measurement tasks for writing with 170 students in 2nd and 3rd grade. The 2 tasks, Story Starter and Picture Story, varied on topical support. Both tasks used production and accuracy scores, and we developed a qualitative score for Picture Story. All production and accuracy scores and the qualitative score demonstrated low to moderate validity coefficients with the Woodcock–Johnson Test of Achievement Writing Samples subtest and a teacher rating of overall writing ability. All scores were sensitive to grade-level differences in performance, with 3rd-grade students performing higher than 2nd-grade students. Two scores for Picture Story were sensitive to growth only for 3rd-grade students, and 5 scores were sensitive to bimonthly growth for both grade levels. There was moderate classification accuracy for both tasks.
    Reading and Writing Quarterly 01/2013; 29(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Writing may be the most complex facet of the language arts. Students need to become competent writers to succeed in school and society; therefore, teaching these skills is an important educational goal. To accomplish this goal, schools must identify students who have writing difficulties early in order to enact effectual interventions. Early screening and intervention is even more important in the current educational climate of response to intervention. In this article we discuss how schools can create a tiered system of screening, intervention, and progress monitoring for writing.
    Reading and Writing Quarterly 01/2013; 29(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This case study examines the impact of intensive research-based instruction on the reading development of a bilingual adolescent male with a history of reading failure. The study demonstrates the value of using normative-based assessments for accurately diagnosing a specific learning disability and curriculum-based measures for monitoring the effects of intervention. The results of a 24-week intervention also demonstrated the effectiveness of both progress monitoring and instruction when delivered in a daily, individualized setting. This case study clearly illustrates that adolescents with poor literacy can make adequate progress but that some schools are still failing to provide adequate and appropriate instruction to students who struggle to learn to read and spell. We also discuss implications for response-to-intervention models for secondary students.
    Reading and Writing Quarterly 01/2013; 29(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Explicit strategy instruction combined with student-directed self-regulation in conjunction with cognitive strategies has proven effective in supporting low-achieving students' reading comprehension. Experts have extended 1 such approach, self-regulated strategy development (SRSD) for the expository reading comprehension Think before reading, think While reading, think After reading (TWA) strategy, by integrating instruction for writing, language development, and prompted discourse into the instructional framework. Researchers have found positive performance effects following SRSD for TWA instruction across reading comprehension and language measures, oral and written summarization, oral and written retelling, and informative essay writing. Findings from 8 empirical studies have provided insights for research and practice.
    Reading and Writing Quarterly 01/2013; 29(2).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The simple view of reading posits that reading comprehension can be decomposed into a print-specific component (concerning decoding and sight word reading) and a language comprehension component (concerning verbal and metalinguistic skills not related to print). One might properly consider lexical skills, indexed by vocabulary measures, part of the language component; however, vocabulary measures end up taking up substantial amounts of print-dependent reading comprehension variance, presumably because of the interrelations among semantic, orthographic, and phonological specification of lexical entries. In the present study we examined the role of vocabulary in the prediction of reading comprehension by testing alternative formulations within the context of the simple view. We used cross-sectional and (1-year) longitudinal data from 436 children in Grades 3–6 attending regular classrooms. We quantified the proportion of variance accounting for reading comprehension that could be attributed to vocabulary measures. We then tested a latent variable model positing a mediating position for vocabulary against a model with lexically based covariation among the simple view components. We discuss the results in an attempt to bring together the simple view with the lexical quality hypothesis for reading comprehension.
    Reading and Writing Quarterly 01/2013; 29(2).
  • Reading and Writing Quarterly 01/2013; 29(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We carried out an experimental study with 2 groups of fourth graders through 10 weekly workshops of 90 min each. The experimental group consisted of 66 fourth graders (male = 26, female = 40), the control group consisted of 48 fourth graders (male = 23, female = 25), and both groups included less skilled and skilled writers. The experimental group children were taught and practiced “linguistic games” in which they had to modify narrative texts according to a specific rule or by introducing a new element, with the aim of creating a new and coherent text. The results showed an improvement in the experimental group children's ability to modify texts and an increase in their liking of narrative. Although differences in posttest writing tasks emerged between less skilled and skilled writers, no difference emerged either in liking of writing or in self-perception of competence.
    Reading and Writing Quarterly 01/2012; 28(1):29-50.