Mental Health Aspects of Developmental Disabilities

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  • ISSN
    1057-3291

Publications in this journal

  • Mental Health Aspects of Developmental Disabilities 01/2002; 5:118-124.
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    ABSTRACT: In Ontario, the psychiatric hospitals currently provide the only available specialized inpatient treatment settings for individuals with developmental disabilities and mental health needs. The policy context for service provided by five specialized inpatient units is reviewed, with the results of a survey regarding the number of beds, team composition, staffing ratio and environmental adaptations. Since 1990, there has been an overall expansion of the specialized services offered by the psychiatric hospitals. Additionally, all programs have adopted a multidisciplinary biopsychosocial approach and have undertaken environmental adaptations to address the specific needs of individuals with developmental disabilities and mental health needs living in a hospital environment. The role of these units within the developing continuum of specialized services in Ontario requires further consideration by policy makers and service providers. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Mental Health Aspects of Developmental Disabilities 01/1970;
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    ABSTRACT: Anxiety disorders occur in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) at higher rates than in children with other developmental disabilities and children with typical development. Research on childhood anxiety supports cognitive-behavioral therapies as the treatment of choice to reduce anxiety symptoms. Parent involvement also positively impacts treatment outcome for these children. Research on the efficacy of psychosocial interventions for children with ASD and anxiety symptoms is sparse. This paper will review the literature on parental involvement in anxiety treatment and provide suggestions for involving parents of children who have both ASD and anxiety symptoms. Implications for future research will be offered. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Mental Health Aspects of Developmental Disabilities 01/1970;
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    ABSTRACT: Little is known, beyond anecdotal reports, concerning the challenging behaviors of some children with CHARGE Syndrome. One hundred respondents from the US (74%) and seven other countries, primarily mothers (91%), completed a web-based survey regarding the behaviors of a person with CHARGE (median age of 7). Included was a medical history and a list of 71 behaviors based on the diagnostic categories most frequently reported anecdotally. Findings supported these reports. Behaviors typical of autistic disorder, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, Tourette syndrome, and deaf-blindness were characteristic of these children. Those who were deaf-blind received higher ratings on these challenging behaviors. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Mental Health Aspects of Developmental Disabilities 01/1970;
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    ABSTRACT: Although the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition allows for the simultaneous diagnosis of intellectual disability and schizophrenia, no one has demonstrated the validity of this practice. A literature review suggests that this particular dual diagnosis be limited to persons with a significant family history of schizophrenia, or in whom the clinical decline from a premorbid baseline is unequivocal. Future research should consider novel interventions for patients with intellectual disability and apparent schizophrenia because there is very little evidence to support the use of the same treatments in patients with and without intellectual disability. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Mental Health Aspects of Developmental Disabilities 01/1970;
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    ABSTRACT: Situations requiring novel responses or greater levels of autonomy than a person with mental retardation (MR) is comfortable with can set the stage for a developmental crisis and precipitate an Adjustment Disorder, Delayed or Post-traumatic Stress Disorder, or major psychiatric disorder, with resulting mental health consultation. Major psychiatric disorders must not only be sought for in the diagnostic process, but must also be ruled out when the phenomena displayed do not meet Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV (DSM-IV) diagnostic criteria. Knowledge of the events in the lives of persons with MR that can precipitate a crisis and a mental health consultation can lead to accurate diagnosis and point to therapeutic resolution. Adjustment Disorders, Delayed or Post-traumatic Stress Disorders cannot be successfully treated unless the precipitating environmental stressor is relieved. Acute episodes of major psychiatric disorders, no matter how appropriate and well-tolerated the pharmacotherapeutic and psychotherapeutic interventions, cannot be wholly resolved without resolution of a precipitating developmental crisis. When recognized, sources of developmental crises can be defused and future episodes anticipated and prevented. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Mental Health Aspects of Developmental Disabilities 01/1970;
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    ABSTRACT: This paper describes the psychopharmacological interventions in patients with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS), Partial Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (PFAS) or Alcohol-related Neurodevelopmental Disorder (ARND). The pharmacological histories of patients who had a confirmed inutero exposure to alcohol and were between the ages of 3.5 and 17 yrs were collected from a chart review of children seen in a child development unit over the previous seven years. Medications were grouped under 6 categories: stimulants, α2-presynaptic agonists, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, mood stabilizers, antipsychotics, and tricyclics. Twenty-two patients had 66 medications trials: 63% responded well to stimulants. 82% responded well to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, 88% responded well to a mood stabilizer and 83% responded well to an antipsychotic. Aggressive treatment, including medication, should beneficially influence the broad range of secondary disabilities seen in these patients. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Mental Health Aspects of Developmental Disabilities 01/1970;