Journal of Child Sexual Abuse (J Child Sex Abuse )

Description

The Journal of Child Sexual Abuse is interdisciplinary and interfaces among researchers, academicians, attorneys, clinicians, and practitioners. The journal advocates for increased networking in the sexual abuse field, greater dissemination of information and research, a higher priority for this international epidemic, and development of effective assessment, intervention, and prevention programs. Divided into sections to provide clear information, the journal covers research issues, clinical issues, legal issues, prevention programs, case studies, and brief reports, focusing on three subject groups - child and adolescent victims of sexual abuse or incest, adult survivors of childhood sexual abuse or incest, and sexual abuse or incest offenders. Research, treatment approaches and techniques, prevention, intervention, and other programs concerning any of these groups are general categories of the published articles and brief reports. The articles emphasize applying research, treatment, and interventions to practical situations so the importance of the results will be clear. The Journal of Child Sexual Abuse covers a wide array of important topics, including: effectiveness of treatment and interview techniques, use of assessment methods and self-report measures, including plethysmography for offenders, evaluation of sexual abuse allegations, forensic issues and "expert testimony" characteristics and identification of male and female offenders, survivors, and victims, long-term effects of sexual abuse, prevention programs and their effectiveness, intrafamily versus extrafamily abuse, ritualized abuse, PTSD, dissociative and multiple personality disorders related to sexual abuse, chemical dependency and eating disorders related to sexual abuse, ethnic and multicultural issues, the backlash movement and its effects on clinicians, effectiveness of legal, criminal justice, medical, social, and clinical intervention programs. Additional topics include international policy and decisionmaking with respect to sexual abuse, school and family interventions, theoretical models and their applications, psychopharmacology, ethical issues, training issues, mandatory reporting, and legal issues.

  • Impact factor
    0.75
  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
    7.10
  • Immediacy index
    0.05
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.00
  • Website
    Journal of Child Sexual Abuse website
  • Other titles
    Journal of child sexual abuse
  • ISSN
    1053-8712
  • OCLC
    22683562
  • Material type
    Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Abstract The study aimed to examine the role of dissociation (persisting vs. peritraumatic) in self-injurious behavior (SIB) among at-risk Israeli female adolescents. In addition, the relationship between childhood sexual abuse (CSA), depression, dissociation, and potency was investigated. A convenience sample of 93 female adolescents aged 12 years to 18 years were recruited from institutions for at-risk adolescent girls in Israel. Participants were administered an anonymous self-report questionnaire that included six measures: Demographics, Dissociative Experiences Scale (H-DES), Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), The Peritraumatic Dissociative Experiences Questionnaire (PDEQ), The Traumatic Events Questionnaire (TEQ), and the Potency Scale. Results indicated that childhood sexual abuse increases the risk for SIB more than three-fold. Higher levels of persisting dissociation were found among those who reported CSA compared to no-CSA girls. SIB was predicted by persistent dissociation. Girls who engaged in SIB had lower potency and higher depression levels, regardless of CSA history.
    Journal of Child Sexual Abuse 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract We examined correlations of child sexual abuse (CSA) among 300 adolescent girls in psychiatric inpatient treatment. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) -based psychiatric diagnoses were obtained from the Schedule for Affective Disorder and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children-Present and Lifetime (K-SADS-PL) and data on family and behavioral characteristics from the European Addiction Severity Index (EuropASI). A total of 79 girls (26.3%) had experienced CSA during their lifetime. CSA was associated with an adolescent's home environment, sibling status, smoking, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) diagnosis, self-mutilating behavior, and suicidal behavior. At least 62% of the perpetrators were acquaintances of the victims. Correlates of CSA can be used to identify CSA victims and persons at heightened risk for CSA.
    Journal of Child Sexual Abuse 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Sibling incest is a serious form of intra-familial sexual abuse with health, social and legal relevance. A retrospective study was conducted, through the analysis of forensic medical reports of the alleged sibling incest of victims under 18 years old (n=68) from 2004 to 2011, as well as the respective judicial outcomes. Results demonstrated that sibling's sexual abuse is associated with several circumstances that might exacerbate its severity such as vaginal, anal and/or oral penetration. Moreover, the victim's young age, the proximity between victim and abuser, and the fact that it is committed at victim's and/or abuser's home and by using physical violence and verbal threats, justify a late detection of these cases.
    Journal of Child Sexual Abuse 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract The objective of this study was to ascertain beliefs and knowledge of pediatricians and parents regarding the hymen and to evaluate parental and pediatrician attitudes regarding sex education by pediatricians. Surveys were distributed anonymously to parents and pediatricians. Survey questions included knowledge of the female hymen and questions regarding attitudes toward sexual health education. There was a statistically significant difference in mean knowledge scores between pediatricians and parents regarding the hymen (3.7 versus 1.3; p < 0.0001). Almost two-thirds of pediatricians (63%) felt comfortable providing sexual health education directly to their patients, but only 41% felt comfortable educating parents. Pediatricians and parents demonstrate knowledge gaps about the hymen.
    Journal of Child Sexual Abuse 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Child sexual abuse (CSA) in the Catholic Church has been increasingly recognized as a problem not limited to individual institutions. Recent inquiry commission reports provide substantial information on offense dynamics, but their conclusions have not been synthesized with empirical research to date. The aim of this systematic literature review was to bring together key findings and identify gaps in the evidence base. The three main focus points were: (a) types of publications and methodology used, (b) frequency information on CSA in the Catholic Church, (c) individual factors in offending, and (d) institutional factors. It was found that reports, legal assessments, and research on CSA within the Catholic Church provide extensive descriptive and qualitative information for five different countries. This includes individual psychological factors (static risk predictors, multiple trajectories) and institutional factors (opportunity, social dynamics), as well as prevalence rates illustrating a high "dark figure" of CSA.
    Journal of Child Sexual Abuse 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract This research paper attempts to explore the cultural and patriarchal relevance of child sexual abuse in a conservative town in India, with a special interest in understanding the current problems experienced by teenage girls in India. A questionnaire was distributed to 100 respondents who belonged to Thiagarajar College of Engineering, Thiruparangundram, Madurai. The questionnaire was developed with special reference to the female protagonist, Lily in Jaishree Misra's Secrets & Lies. The resulting research paper also includes an e-interview with Jaishree Misra. The researchers hypothesize that change can be envisioned when the social conscience is awakened to cruel events that happen in the Indian population. Change regarding social events must go even further to allow children to blossom and experience the joys of childhood.
    Journal of Child Sexual Abuse 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this exploratory study was to examine youths' perceptions of statutory victimization relationships and youths' experience interacting with professionals. In-person qualitative interviews were conducted with 22 youths identified as statutory rape victims by two child advocacy centers. Using grounded theory, interviews were coded thematically using constant comparison analysis. The discussion of the relationship dynamics suggested a great deal of variation. Some youths described the relationships in exploitive terms. However, more typically, the interviewed youth described the relationship as reciprocal, even some time after it had ended. The professional intervention often resulted in feelings of helplessness for the youth. The results suggest creative and flexible protocols are needed for handling these cases that recognize adolescents' developing autonomy.
    Journal of Child Sexual Abuse 01/2014; 23(8):935-56.
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    ABSTRACT: This study explores the relationship between fear of various types of sexual offenders and a belief that those sexual offenders should be subject to sex offender registration. We hypothesized that those who offend against children would elicit the most fear; consequently, the most feared offenders would be rated as most requiring registration. As part of a telephone survey, 733 participants answered questions about fear of sex offenders and agreement with requirements about registration for offenders convicted of incest, statutory rape, marital rape, pedophilia, date rape, and an offense committed more than 10 years prior. Results indicated that all types of sexual offenders elicited some fear from respondents, and fear was related to support of registration requirements.
    Journal of Child Sexual Abuse 05/2009; 18(3):290-301.
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    ABSTRACT: This paper deals with the issue of including in the same therapeutic group in a prison setting two (or more) young people who participated in the same gang rape. We provide a background for group therapy with adolescent sex offenders and point out the characteristics of group rape. In addition, we describe the uniqueness of working in a prison as opposed to working in the community or other settings outside the home. Characteristics of adolescent sex offenders and the group process provide a rationale against the inclusion in the same therapeutic group of two youths who committed a rape together. However, our observations during eight years of clinical experience and research in the prison clarify why it can and should be done.
    Journal of Child Sexual Abuse 05/2009; 18(3):302-19.
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    ABSTRACT: A questionnaire was given to 500 mental health and child welfare professionals asking for maximum acceptable ages for siblings to engage jointly in certain family practices related to hygiene, affection, and privacy. A large proportion of respondents felt it was never acceptable for siblings to take showers together (40%), kiss on the mouth (37%), or toilet together (32%). Some significant differences occurred based on the gender of the older sibling within sets of same gender or mixed gender pairs, with older brothers being acceptable up to lower ages than older sisters. The effects of child abuse, age, race, and the amount of education on the respondents' answers are investigated. The limitations of the age guidelines are discussed.
    Journal of Child Sexual Abuse 05/2009; 18(3):339-54.
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to identify possible differences between high- and low-risk sex offenders. The subjects included 285 sex offenders on probation. They were evaluated with the Static-99, Abel Assessment, Raven's, and MMPI-2. A criminal history review identified the number of prior offenses and the age/sex category in the index offense. The high- and low-risk groups were compared on 26 variables: intelligence, age, criminal history, denial patterns, measured sexual interest in children, admission of sexual interests, a childhood history of sexual abuse, victim's age, and personality variables. Four variables significantly accounted for 64% of the variance: age, prior number of felonies, the Cognitive Distortion Score, and the MMPI-2 Infrequency scale score.
    Journal of Child Sexual Abuse 02/2009; 18(2):137-53.
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    ABSTRACT: The recovered memory controversy has been an ongoing debate within the mental health profession for the past two decades. Disagreement remains in the field over the veracity of "forgotten" memories of childhood sexual abuse that are recalled or recovered during therapy. At the heart of the controversy are the concepts of repression and dissociation as well as the impact traumatizing events have on the encoding of memory. This article provides an overview of the central factors in the longstanding debate and presents a detailed clinical case study involving independent corroboration of memories of childhood sexual abuse recovered during treatment, which the author believes provides additional support for the potential veracity of recovered memories.
    Journal of Child Sexual Abuse 02/2009; 18(1):103-21.
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    ABSTRACT: In the initial analysis of data from a random sample of all those charged with child sexual abuse in Idaho over a 13-year period, only one predictive variable was found that related to recidivism of those convicted. Variables such as ethnicity, relationship, gender, and age differences did not show a significant or even large association with recidivism. The only variable that seemed to show both a significant and almost moderate association to recidivism was the Risk Assessment in the Sex Offender Evaluation reoffense. Comparisons were made to prior research as well as a discussion of implications of the sex offender evaluation for the legal process. Finally, a call for the continued need for further research is discussed.
    Journal of Child Sexual Abuse 02/2009; 18(2):123-36.
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    ABSTRACT: This study examined perceptions of child sexual abuse and attributions of responsibility in a cross-sectional convenience sample of 384 African-American undergraduates using a scenario manipulating the age of the victim, gender of the victim, and gender of the perpetrator. Multiple interactions of respondent, victim, and perpetrator gender on perception of intrafamilial child sexual abuse and attributions of responsibility for victim, perpetrator, and parents were obtained. These results extended previous research conducted on primarily Caucasian samples and highlighted the moderating role of gender of the respondent for this ethnicity.
    Journal of Child Sexual Abuse 02/2009; 18(1):61-77.
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    ABSTRACT: In the emerging literature, cases involving recurring, unsubstantiated allegations of child sexual abuse have generally been categorized as Munchausen by proxy. Recent scholars have recommended restricting the label to the original conceptualization, involving purposeful deception motivated by psychological needs for medical attention. This leaves many cases unclassified that do not fit the Munchausen by proxy criteria, involve significant risks to the child, and ultimately fall outside of existing structures for Child Protective Services/legal intervention. This paper presents a reconceptualization of such cases, proposing to label them "recurring sexual abuse allegation" cases. Defining the set of cases more clearly can aid child protection workers in their management and encourage research on prevalence, consequences to children, treatment strategies, and needed legal reforms.
    Journal of Child Sexual Abuse 02/2009; 18(2):206-20.
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    ABSTRACT: The component structure of the Child Dissociative Checklist was examined among abused children. A factor described as pathological dissociation emerged that was predicted by participants being male. There also were differences in pathological dissociation between groups of sexually abused and physically abused children. Replication of this factor and the establishment of base rates for various groups of children are recommended so that the Child Dissociative Checklist might be used to more effectively eliminate false positives and increase true positives in the screening and ultimate treatment of dissociative children.
    Journal of Child Sexual Abuse 02/2009; 18(1):93-102.
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    ABSTRACT: A growing number of jurisdictions in North America, the United Kingdom, and Australasia have enacted legislation allowing for special sentencing, civil commitment, and community supervision options for high risk sexual offenders. In New Zealand, one example of this concern for public protection is the Parole (Extended Supervision) Amendment Act 2004, which provides for additional supervision of sexual offenders with child victims for up to 10 years after their release from prison. Recent experience with expert evidence and judicial decision making in such cases suggests that those involved in the process might benefit from a more thorough understanding of the current state of sexual offender risk assessment that can be provided by mental health professionals.
    Journal of Child Sexual Abuse 02/2009; 18(2):174-89.