Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics of North America (Gastrointest Endosc Clin )

Publisher: Elsevier

Description

Each issue of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics reviews new diagnostic and management techniques for a single clinical problem--and makes them simple to apply. Its concise, comprehensive, and its editors and authors are respected experts.

  • Impact factor
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  • 5-year impact
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  • Cited half-life
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  • Immediacy index
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  • Eigenfactor
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  • Website
    Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics website
  • Other titles
    Gastrointestinal endoscopy clinics of North America
  • ISSN
    1052-5157
  • OCLC
    22298969
  • Material type
    Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

Elsevier

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Pre-print allowed on any website or open access repository
    • Voluntary deposit by author of authors post-print allowed on authors' personal website, arXiv.org or institutions open scholarly website including Institutional Repository, without embargo, where there is not a policy or mandate
    • Deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate only allowed where separate agreement between repository and the publisher exists.
    • Permitted deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate, may be required to comply with embargo periods of 12 months to 48 months .
    • Set statement to accompany deposit
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to journal home page or articles' DOI
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • NIH Authors articles will be submitted to PubMed Central after 12 months
    • Publisher last contacted on 18/10/2013
  • Classification
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Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The Chicago Classification defines esophageal motility disorders in high resolution manometry. This is based on individual scoring of 10 swallows performed in supine position. Disorders of esophago-gastric junction (EGJ) outflow obstruction are defined by a median integrated relaxation pressure above the limit of normal and divided into 3 achalasia subtypes and EGJ outflow obstruction. Major motility disorders (aperistalsis, distal esophageal spasm, and hypercontractile esophagus) are patterns not encountered in controls in the context of normal EGJ relaxation. Finally with the latest version of the Chicago Classification, only two minor motor disorders are considered: ineffective esophageal motility and fragmented peristalsis.
    Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics of North America 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The mechanical properties of the esophagogastric junction (EGJ) are of major importance for the competence of the EGJ. Although manometry reliably measures sphincter pressure, no information is provided on distensibility, a crucial determinant of flow across the EGJ. Recently, a new technique, impedance planimetry, was introduced allowing accurate measurement of compliance or distensibility. This review discusses the recent advances in this area and highlights the clinical relevance of this new technique evaluating the mechanical properties of the esophageal wall and EGJ.
    Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics of North America 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The development and advancement of ambulatory esophageal pH monitoring has provided a key tool with which pathologic esophageal acid exposure can be objectively measured; although not perfect, it provides the clinician with arguably the most important piece of information in the diagnosis and management of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. It is also important to emphasize that, although esophageal pH monitoring can reliably measure esophageal acid exposure, assessing the relationship of abnormal findings and the patients' symptoms is a much more complex matter and, of course, the key to successful treatment outcomes.
    Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics of North America 10/2014; 24(4):581–594.
  • Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics of North America 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Esophageal function testing should be used for differential diagnosis of dysphagia. Dysphagia can be the consequence of hypermotility or hypomotility of the muscles of the esophagus. Decreased esophageal or esophagogastric junction distensibility can provoke dysphagia. The most well established esophageal dysmotility is achalasia. Other motility disorders can also cause dysphagia. High-resolution manometry (HRM) is the gold standard investigation for esophageal motility disorders. Simultaneous measurement of HRM and intraluminal impedance can be useful to assess motility and bolus transit. Impedance planimetry measures distensibility of the esophageal body and gastroesophageal junction in patients with achalasia and eosinophilic esophagitis.
    Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics of North America 10/2014;
  • Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics of North America 10/2014; 24(4):xiii–xiv.
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    ABSTRACT: Dramatic progress has been made over the past decade in the sophistication and availability of equipment to test esophageal motility and sensation. High-resolution esophageal manometry and impedance have moved from the research clinic into clinical practice. Some of the testing is costly and time consuming, and requires extensive experience to perform the testing and properly interpret the results. These sensory studies are valuable in the interpretation of clinical problems, and provide important research information. Clinicians should evaluate the research studies to advance their understanding of the pathophysiology of the esophagus.
    Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics of North America 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Rumination is a phenomenon characterized by retrograde flow of gastric contents into the mouth, otherwise known as regurgitation. Repetitive excessive occurrence of rumination is considered pathologic and is known as the rumination syndrome. Belching occurs occasionally in everyone and is often not related to a disease or a pathologic condition. Gastric belches are physiologic events caused by retrograde flow of air into the esophagus and mouth; however, supragastric belching is associated with belching disorders and is considered pathologic behavior.
    Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics of North America 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Barium esophagography, although an old test, remains important to the understanding of esophageal physiology and diagnosis of esophageal disorders. It provides additive and/or confirmatory information to endoscopy and is the more accurate means of yielding diagnosis. Barium esophagography allows correlation of symptoms with barium findings and with varied textures substances. It allows, particularly for oropharyngeal dysfunction, implementation therapeutic maneuvers and instructions while testing. The caveat to maintaining the benefits of barium esophagography is continuing to promote and support expertise from our radiologists in performing these studies, which has been challenged by our cost-efficient and high-tech medical society.
    Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics of North America 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The function of the esophagus is transporting nutrients from the oropharyngeal cavity to the stomach. This is achieved by coordinated contractions and relaxation of the tubular esophagus and the upper and lower esophageal sphincter. Multichannel intraluminal impedance monitoring offers quantification of esophageal bolus transit and/or retention without the use of ionizing radiation. Combined with conventional or high-resolution manometry, impedance measurements complement the quantification of esophageal body contraction and sphincter relaxation, offering a more comprehensive evaluation of esophageal function. Further studies evaluating the utility of quantifying bolus transit will help clarify the role and position of impedance measurements.
    Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics of North America 10/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is frequently diagnosed by symptoms and good response to acid suppression with proton pump inhibitors. Further work up is required when the diagnosis of GERD is uncertain, for alarm symptoms, PPI-refractoriness, and often for extraesophageal presentations. Useful tools include endoscopy for mucosal assessment and reflux monitoring (pH or impedance-pH) to quantify reflux burden. Objective documentation of pathological reflux is mandatory prior to anti-reflux surgery. In some patients, symptoms that can be attributed to GERD may have other causes; in these patients, testing that excludes GERD helps direct the diagnostic and treatment efforts to other causes.
    Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics of North America 10/2014; 24(4):655-666.
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    ABSTRACT: Patients with inflammatory bowel disease colitis have an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer compared with the general population. Colonoscopic surveillance remains challenging because the cancer precursor (dysplasia) can have a varied and subtle endoscopic appearance. Although historically the dysplasia was often considered endoscopically invisible, today with advanced endoscopic understanding, technique, and imaging, it is almost always visible. The frequency of different dysplasia morphologies and true clinical significance of such lesions are difficult to determine from retrospective series, many of which were performed prior to the current endoscopic era.
    Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics of North America 07/2014; 24(3):327–335.
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    ABSTRACT: Mucosal healing is an important therapeutic end point in clinical trials and clinical practice. There is no validated definition of mucosal healing in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, although the benefits of achieving mucosal healing include decreased need for corticosteroids, sustained clinical remission, decreased colectomy, and bowel resection. The Ulcerative Colitis Endoscopic Index of Severity is the only validated endoscopic index in ulcerative colitis. The Crohn's Disease Endoscopic Index of Severity and the Simple Endoscopic Score for Crohn's Disease are validated for Crohn disease, and the Rutgeerts Postoperative Endoscopic Index is used to predict recurrence after an ileocolic resection.
    Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics of North America 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: It has been proposed that effective disease control through abrogation of inflammation in IBD may also reduce CRC risk in these individual patients. This article summarizes the potential for medical therapy to reduce the risk of CRC via primary and secondary prevention, and offers practical ways in which a goal of mucosal improvement or healing may be incorporated into clinical practice.
    Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics of North America 07/2014;
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    Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics of North America 07/2014; 24(3):xiii–xiv.
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    ABSTRACT: Over the past several years office-based procedures with sedation have become increasingly more common. It must be appreciated that not all procedures are well suited for this type of environment. Unacceptable ones would include those associated with significant fluid shifts, post-operative pain, bleeding or procedures of long duration. Since esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) and colonoscopy are relatively non-invasive, of short duration, and not associated with either fluid shifts or significant post-procedure discomfort. In appropriate patients, these procedures are well-suited to office-based practice.
    Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics of North America 11/2008; 18(4):707-16, viii.
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    ABSTRACT: The role of sedation in endoscopic procedures has increased and so has the demand for advances in its administration. The pursuit of new agents or administration techniques and their study specific to endoscopic nonsurgical procedures is necessary to improve patient comfort and safety.The science of moderate and deep sedation specific to endoscopy is fledgling but approaching new horizons.
    Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics of North America 11/2008; 18(4):789-99, x.
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    ABSTRACT: The availability of endoscopy as a diagnostic and therapeutic tool has caused the number of procedures performed in the United States to greatly increase; additionally, the volume and complexity of endoscopic procedures performed under sedation, including difficult procedures performed on frail and severely ill patients, has increased. The goals of endoscopic sedation are to provide patients with a successful procedure and to ensure that they remain safe and are relieved from anxiety and discomfort; agents should provide efficient, appropriate sedation and allow patients to recover rapidly. Sedation is usually both safe and effective; however, complications may ensue. This article will explore medicolegal aspects of sedation, such as the importance of informed consent for sedation, the difficulties of assessing withdrawal of consent in a sedated patient, and the need for sedation monitoring which meets accepted standard of care. Controversies involving GI directed propofol and the use of anesthesia personnel to deliver sedation for endoscopy are also discussed.
    Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics of North America 11/2008; 18(4):783-8, x.