Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics of North America (Gastrointest Endosc Clin)

Publisher: WB Saunders

Journal description

Each issue of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics reviews new diagnostic and management techniques for a single clinical problem--and makes them simple to apply. Its concise, comprehensive, and its editors and authors are respected experts.

Current impact factor: 0.00

Impact Factor Rankings

Additional details

5-year impact 0.00
Cited half-life 0.00
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Article influence 0.00
Website Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics website
Other titles Gastrointestinal endoscopy clinics of North America
ISSN 1052-5157
OCLC 22298969
Material type Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

WB Saunders

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Pre-print allowed on any website or open access repository
    • Voluntary deposit by author of authors post-print allowed on institutions open scholarly website including Institutional Repository, without embargo, where there is not a policy or mandate
    • Deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate only allowed where separate agreement between repository and the publisher exists.
    • Permitted deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate, may be required to comply with embargo periods of 12 months to 48 months .
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    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to journal home page or articles' DOI
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • NIH Authors articles will be submitted to PubMed Central after 12 months
    • Authors who are required to deposit in subject-based repositories may also use Sponsorship Option
    • 'WB Saunders' is an imprint of 'Elsevier'
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Gastroesophageal variceal hemorrhage is a medical emergency with high morbidity and mortality. Endoscopic therapy is the mainstay of management of bleeding varices. It requires attention to technique and the appropriate choice of therapy for a given patient at a given point in time. Subjects must be monitored continuously after initiation of therapy for control of bleeding, and second-line definitive therapies must be introduced quickly if endoscopic and pharmacologic treatment fails. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics of North America 06/2015; 25(3). DOI:10.1016/j.giec.2015.03.004
  • Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics of North America 05/2015; 25(3). DOI:10.1016/j.giec.2015.04.001
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    ABSTRACT: Effective endoscopic therapy for upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding has been shown to reduce rebleeding, need for surgery, and mortality. Effective endoscopic management of acute upper GI bleeding can be challenging and worrying. This article provides advice that is complementary to the in-depth reviews that accompany it in this issue. Topics include initial management, resuscitation, when and where to scope, benefits and limitations of devices, device selection based on lesion characteristics, improving visualization to localize the lesion, and tips on how to reduce the endoscopist's trepidation about managing these cases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics of North America 04/2015; 25(3). DOI:10.1016/j.giec.2015.02.004
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    ABSTRACT: Acute variceal hemorrhage (AVH) is a lethal complication of portal hypertension and should be suspected in every patient with liver cirrhosis who presents with upper gastrointestinal bleed. AVH-related mortality has decreased in the last few decades from 40% to 15%-20% due to advances in the general and specific management of variceal hemorrhage. This review summarizes current management of AVH and prevention of recurrent hemorrhage with a focus on pharmacologic therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics of North America 04/2015; 25(3). DOI:10.1016/j.giec.2015.03.001
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    ABSTRACT: Topical hemostatic agents and powders are an emerging modality in the endoscopic management of upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding. This systematic review demonstrates the effectiveness and safety of these agents with special emphasis on TC-325 and Ankaferd Blood Stopper. The unique noncontact/nontraumatic application, ability to cover large areas of bleed, and ease of use make these hemostatic agents an attractive option in certain clinical situations, such as massive bleeding with poor visualization, salvage therapy, and diffuse bleeding from luminal malignancies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics of North America 04/2015; 25(3). DOI:10.1016/j.giec.2015.02.008
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    ABSTRACT: Acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding remains an important cause of hospital admission with an associated mortality of 2-14%. Initial patient evaluation includes rapid hemodynamic assessment, large-bore intravenous catheter insertion and volume resuscitation. A hemoglobin transfusion threshold of 7 g/dL is recommended, and packed red blood cell transfusion may be necessary to restore intravascular volume and improve tissue perfusion. Patients should be risk stratified into low- and high-risk categories, using validated prognostic scoring systems such as the Glasgow-Blatchford, AIMS65 or Rockall scores. Effective early management of acute, nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage is critical for improving patient outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics of North America 04/2015; 25(3). DOI:10.1016/j.giec.2015.02.006
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is an important clinical condition managed routinely by endoscopists. Diagnostic and therapeutic options vary immensely based on the source of bleeding and it is important for the gastroenterologist to be cognizant of both common and uncommon etiologies. The focus of this article is to highlight and discuss unusual sources of upper GI bleeding, with a particular emphasis on both the clinical and endoscopic features to help diagnose and treat these atypical causes of bleeding. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics of North America 04/2015; 25(3). DOI:10.1016/j.giec.2015.02.009
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    ABSTRACT: Antithrombotic drugs (anticoagulants, aspirin, and other antiplatelet agents) are used to treat cardiovascular disease and to prevent secondary thromboembolic events. These drugs are independently associated with an increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB), and, when prescribed in combination, further increase the risk of adverse bleeding events. Clinical evidence to inform the choice of endoscopic hemostatic procedure, safe temporary drug cessation, and use of reversal agents is reviewed to optimize management following clinically significant GIB. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics of North America 04/2015; 25(3). DOI:10.1016/j.giec.2015.02.002
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Endoscopic treatment of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is considered the first line of therapy. Although standard techniques, such as epinephrine injection, through-the-scope hemoclips, bipolar coagulation, argon plasma coagulation, and band ligation are routinely used, some GI bleeds are refractory to these therapies. Newer technologies have emerged to assist with the treatment of GI bleeding. This article highlights endoscopic and endoscopic ultrasound-guided therapies that may be used by experienced endoscopists for the primary control of GI bleeding or for cases refractory to standard hemostatic techniques. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics of North America 04/2015; 25(3). DOI:10.1016/j.giec.2015.02.005
  • Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics of North America 02/2015; 25(2). DOI:10.1016/j.giec.2015.02.001
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    ABSTRACT: The successful intubation of the cecum during screening or surveillance colonoscopy is vital to ensure complete mucosal inspection of the colon on withdrawal. Even when performed by an experienced endoscopist, colonoscope insertion can sometimes be challenging. Water-aided colonoscopy can be used to assist the endoscopist in navigating colons with anatomies that may be challenging owing to severe angulation or redundancy. Water-assisted colonoscopy involves the infusion of water without air and subsequent suctioning during insertion (exchange) or withdrawal (immersion or infusion). This review discusses the technique, effectiveness, safety of water-assisted colonoscopy as well as the application in sedationless endscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc.
    Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics of North America 02/2015; 25(2). DOI:10.1016/j.giec.2014.11.002
  • Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics of North America 02/2015; 25(2). DOI:10.1016/j.giec.2014.12.002
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    ABSTRACT: Most colorectal cancer arises from adenomatous polyps. This gradual process may be interrupted by screening and treatment using colonoscopy and polypectomy. Advances in imaging platforms have led to classification systems that facilitate prediction of histologic type and both stratification for and prediction of the risk of invasion. Endoscopic treatment should be the standard of care even for extensive advanced mucosal neoplasm. Technique selection is influenced by lesion features, location, patient factors, and local expertise. Postprocedural complications are more common following advanced resection and endoscopists should be familiar with risk factors, early detection methods, and management. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics of North America 02/2015; 25(2). DOI:10.1016/j.giec.2014.11.005
  • Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics of North America 01/2015; 25(1):xiii-xiv. DOI:10.1016/j.giec.2014.10.001
  • Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics of North America 01/2015; 25(1):xi-xii. DOI:10.1016/j.giec.2014.10.002
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    ABSTRACT: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a heterogeneous disease and each CRC possesses a unique molecular tumor profile. The main pathways of oncogenesis are the chromosomal instability, microsatellite instability and serrated neoplasia pathway. Sessile serrated adenomas/polyps (SSA/Ps) may be the precursor lesions of CRC arising via the serrated neoplasia pathway. This has led to a paradigm shift because all SSA/Ps should be detected and resected during colonoscopy. The ability to accurately detect and resect only those polyps with a malignant potential could result in safer and cost-effective practice. Optimization of the endoscopic classification systems is however needed to implement targeted prevention methods. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics of North America 01/2015; 25(2). DOI:10.1016/j.giec.2014.11.004
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    ABSTRACT: Precolonoscopy bowel preparation is adequate to identify lesions larger than 5 mm about 70% to 75% of the time, but the opportunity for further improvement exists. The use of high-quality formulations with established efficacy rates of 90% or greater, identification of patients who are at increased risk of an inadequate preparation, as well as patient education and motivation to be invested in the process further improves the success of cleansing. Endoscopists should strive to achieve an adequate bowel preparation in 85% or more of patients. High-quality colonoscopy requires high-quality bowel cleansing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics of North America 01/2015; 25(2). DOI:10.1016/j.giec.2014.11.003
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Endoscopy constitutes a wide range of procedures with many indications. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy, colonoscopy, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, endoscopic ultrasonography, and enteroscopy comprise the most commonly performed procedures. These examinations all carry risk to the patient, and incumbent in this is some legal risk with regard to how the procedure is conducted, decisions made based on the intraprocedure findings, and the postprocedure results, in addition to events that occur following the procedure. This article provides an overview of consent and complications of endoscopy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics of North America 01/2015; 25(1):1-8. DOI:10.1016/j.giec.2014.09.001
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    ABSTRACT: Colonoscopy is a commonly performed procedure. The rate of adverse events is 2.8 per 1000 screening colonoscopies. These adverse events include cardiovascular and pulmonary events, abdominal pain, hemorrhage, perforation, postpolypectomy syndrome, infection, and death. Serious adverse events, such as hemorrhage and perforation, occur most frequently when colonoscopy is performed with polypectomy. This article highlights the prevention and management of adverse events associated with polypectomy and endoscopic mucosal resection of colonic lesions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics of North America 01/2015; 25(1):55-69. DOI:10.1016/j.giec.2014.09.007