PRIMUS: problems, resources, and issues in mathematics undergraduate studies (Primus )

Publisher: Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology, Taylor & Francis

Description

PRIMUS is a refereed journal devoted to dialogue and exchange of ideas among those interested in teaching undergraduate mathematics. This includes those who prepare students for college level mathematics, those who teach college level mathematics, and those who receive students who have been taught college level mathematics. Each issue contains relevant and worthwhile material for those interested in collegiate mathematics education. While the primary interest is in first person descriptive and narrative articles about implemented teaching strategies and interesting mathematics, there is also opportunity for writing broad survey articles, formal studies of new teaching approaches, assessments of planned and in place strategies, and general discussion writing on teaching undergraduate mathematics. The journal motto, "The lightning spark of the thought generated in the solitary mind awakens in another mind . . ." by the Scottish essayist Thomas Carlyle means that publishing in PRIMUS is a way of sharing ideas so that others can use and build upon the author's efforts. We welcome your ideas and experiences.

  • Impact factor
    0.00
  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
    0.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.00
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.00
  • Website
    Primus website
  • Other titles
    PRIMUS (Terre Haute, Ind.), PRIMUS, Problems, resources, and issues in mathematics undergraduate studies
  • ISSN
    1051-1970
  • OCLC
    21889576
  • Material type
    Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 12 month embargo for STM, Behavioural Science and Public Health Journals
    • 18 month embargo for SSH journals
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • Pre-print on authors own website, Institutional or Subject Repository
    • Post-print on authors own website, Institutional or Subject Repository
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • Publisher will deposit to PMC on behalf of NIH authors.
    • STM: Science, Technology and Medicine
    • SSH: Social Science and Humanities
    • 'Taylor & Francis (Psychology Press)' is an imprint of 'Taylor & Francis'
  • Classification
    ​ yellow

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The Society of Actuaries (SOA) is the world’s largest actuarial organization. This article describes the SOA with particular attention paid to its education and qualification processes and resources available for university and college programs.
    PRIMUS: problems, resources, and issues in mathematics undergraduate studies 11/2014; 24.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In this introduction to the special issue devoted to actuarial education, we provide an overview of the actuarial profession and what is involved in developing a program to train future actuaries. In addition we point to articles in this issue that include information on the two major actuarial organizations, along with detailed examples of various types of actuarial programs at many levels from very small introductory programs to advanced programs. There are articles on how to start up and run a program, how to handle advising and recruiting problems, and recommendations about courses to prepare students for the actuarial examinations.
    PRIMUS: problems, resources, and issues in mathematics undergraduate studies 11/2014; 24.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper provides suggestions for preparing students to take the actuarial examination on financial mathematics, SOA/CAS Exam FM/2. It is based on current practices employed at Slippery Rock University, a small public liberal arts university. Detailed descriptions of our Theory of Interest course and subsequent Exam FM/2 prep course are provided along with suggestions for course scheduling and strategies for improving performance on the exam.
    PRIMUS: problems, resources, and issues in mathematics undergraduate studies 11/2014; 24.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In 2007, the B.S. in Applied Mathematics program consisting of five concentrations, including Actuarial Science, began at West Chester University of Pennsylvania, and we graduated our first class (of one) that December. We describe our program, some ideas to consider when planning your own program, and share some of the successes of our program which have led to our department having close to 40 Actuarial Science majors in six short years! We will focus on our courses and exam preparation, our internship program, how we built connections with businesses and organizations, and our plans for the future.
    PRIMUS: problems, resources, and issues in mathematics undergraduate studies 11/2014; 24.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Many institutions wish to offer a path for students pursuing actuarial careers but lack the student demand to offer new courses or hire additional faculty. Fortunately, a program training students to enter the profession can often be constructed using existing courses and well-informed advising.
    PRIMUS: problems, resources, and issues in mathematics undergraduate studies 11/2014; 24.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Bryant University was originally a school for business majors and offered only a few mathematics courses. After becoming accredited by the New England Association of Colleges and Universities in the 1960s, the college was required to upgrade its offerings in the area of mathematics. In the 1970s, the department offerings were increased to include computer electives, advanced topics in mathematics, and graduate-level quantitative business courses. As the department grew, majors were established in the department, including a major in Actuarial Mathematics. This major has grown from its first graduating class in 1986 of five students to a current total student enrollment today of 172. This paper discusses the evolution of the major and the success of the program. We provide the curriculum and highlight changes, which were necessary to conform to the ever-changing requirements for becoming an actuarial Fellow. We also discuss unique aspects of our program such as the SAS Certification in Data Mining that has greatly increased the marketability of our students.
    PRIMUS: problems, resources, and issues in mathematics undergraduate studies 11/2014; 24.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this article is to describe the actuarial science program at our university and the development of a course to enhance students’ problem solving skills while preparing them for Exam P/1 of the Society of Actuaries (SOA) and the Casualty Actuary Society (CAS). The Exam P/1 prep course, formally titled Mathematical Foundations of Actuarial Science, has been offered twice by our institution. Since its offering, nine students have sat for Exam P/1 and seven students passed the exam (three students passed on their first attempt). This course has created a new culture emphasizing studying for actuarial examinations and has established camaraderie among actuarial science students at our institution. The Spring 2010 and Spring 2012 versions of the course will be described and compared and future changes to the course will also be presented.
    PRIMUS: problems, resources, and issues in mathematics undergraduate studies 11/2014; 24.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Building an Actuarial Science program designated as advanced requires dedicated faculty, support from the administration, and a core group of strong students. Washburn University may serve as a model for those wishing to start or enhance such a program at their institution. We face three main ongoing challenges: first, the hiring and retention of high-caliber statisticians; second, attraction and retention of top-quality students; and third, concerns over small upper-division classes. We examine the relevant history of the program at Washburn, the actuarial science curriculum, necessary computing experience, the Society of Actuaries/Casualty Actuarial Society exam series, work experience including internships, and some useful actuarial science sites on the World Wide Web.
    PRIMUS: problems, resources, and issues in mathematics undergraduate studies 11/2014; 24.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The article provides details of the process of starting an actuarial science major at a small, liberal arts college. Some critique of the major is included, as well as some challenges that may be faced by others wanting to start such a major at their institution.
    PRIMUS: problems, resources, and issues in mathematics undergraduate studies 11/2014; 24.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We describe specific curricular decisions employed at Butler University that have resulted in student achievement in the actuarial science major. The paper includes a discussion of how these decisions might be applied in the context of a new actuarial program.
    PRIMUS: problems, resources, and issues in mathematics undergraduate studies 11/2014; 24.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Students earning a degree in mathematics often seek information on how to apply their mathematical knowledge. One option is to follow a curriculum with an actuarial emphasis designed to prepare students as an applied mathematician in the actuarial field. By developing only two new courses and utilizing existing courses for Validation by Educational Experiences credit, our university developed an actuarial track to accompany a major in mathematics. An actuarial path attracts additional students to the major in mathematics and is a program of study sustainable by smaller departments.
    PRIMUS: problems, resources, and issues in mathematics undergraduate studies 11/2014; 24.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We describe the roles and duties of a director in developing an introductory actuarial program. Degree plan design, specialized exam courses, internship classes, coordination of efforts with Economics and Finance Departments, opportunities for creating a minor in actuarial mathematics, actuarial clubs, career advice, and interaction with actuarial societies are discussed.
    PRIMUS: problems, resources, and issues in mathematics undergraduate studies 11/2014; 24.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper focuses on the development of an actuarial science track for the mathematics major at Salisbury University (SU). A timeline from the initial investigation into such a program through the proposal and approval processes is shared for those who might be interested in developing a new actuarial program. It is wise to start small and take advantage of as many existing courses as possible. Two new courses were developed to fill the void at SU. These courses as well as seminars for preparing students for SOA/CAS exams are described. The extent to which the program prepares students for taking the actuarial exams and/or finding employment is also discussed.
    PRIMUS: problems, resources, and issues in mathematics undergraduate studies 11/2014; 24.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The Casualty Actuarial Society (CAS) believes that the most effective way to advance the actuarial profession is to work in partnership with universities. The CAS stands ready to assist universities in creating or enhancing courses and curricula associated with property/casualty actuarial science. CAS resources for university actuarial science programs and courses are described.
    PRIMUS: problems, resources, and issues in mathematics undergraduate studies 11/2014; 24.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Albrecht Dürer is well known as a Renaissance artist, but his 1525 work, the Underweysung der Messung, or Manual on Measurement, also contains a significant amount of mathematics. This article outlines four projects inspired by parts of this work, with additional material coming from Staigmüller’s 1891 “Dürer als Mathematiker.” Before-and-after questionnaires were given to the students who worked the projects; their responses are analyzed.
    PRIMUS: problems, resources, and issues in mathematics undergraduate studies 09/2014; 24(8).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article discusses the creation of a student project about linear difference equations using primary sources. Early 18th-century developments in the area are outlined, focusing on efforts by Abraham De Moivre (1667–1754) and Daniel Bernoulli (1700–1782). It is explained how primary sources from these authors can be used to cover material appearing in most discrete mathematics courses while revealing how the mathematical ideas evolved. It is argued that this project works well in a discrete mathematics course that also makes the transition to higher mathematics, developing mathematical reading and writing skills in a natural setting.
    PRIMUS: problems, resources, and issues in mathematics undergraduate studies 09/2014; 24(8).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper outlines a method for teaching topics in undergraduate mathematics or computer science via historical curricular modules. The contents of one module, “Networks and Spanning Trees,” are discussed from the original work of Arthur Cayley, Heinz Prüfer, and Otakar Borůvka that motivates the enumeration and application of trees in graph theory. Cayley correctly identifies a pattern for the number of (labeled) trees on n fixed vertices. Prüfer’s paper provides a rigorous verification of this pattern, whereas Borůvka’s paper offers one of the first algorithms for finding a minimal spanning tree over the domain of labeled trees. These latter two papers in juxtaposition offer a pleasing confluence of concepts and applications, written verbally before the modern terminology of graph theory had been formulated.
    PRIMUS: problems, resources, and issues in mathematics undergraduate studies 09/2014; 24(8).
  • Liu
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    ABSTRACT: The present study aimed to investigate in what way and to what extent Taiwanese college students’ epistemological views of mathematics had evolved during a history-based liberal arts mathematics course titled: “When Liu Hui Meets Archimedes—Development of Eastern and Western Mathematics.” The course was designed to help college students comprehend the cultural features of mathematics by highlighting the similarities and differences in the formation of mathematical knowledge in the Eastern and Western worlds. Through comparing and contrasting collected data, we found students demonstrated different epistemological views of mathematics in three aspects: first, they were able to recognize the diverse features of mathematics; second, they better realized how mathematics had interacted with societies; and third, they tended to comprehend the different mathematical cultures that exist in the Eastern and Western worlds. However, students were unable to appreciate intuition-based inductive approaches and were less likely to acknowledge how creativity and imagination were involved in mathematical thinking.
    PRIMUS: problems, resources, and issues in mathematics undergraduate studies 09/2014; 24(8).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The benefits of including the study of the history of mathematics in the education of mathematics majors have been discussed at length elsewhere. Many colleges and universities now offer a History of Mathematics course for mathematics majors, for mathematics education majors, or for general credit. At Hood College, we emphasize our commitment to the liberal arts by including history in many courses. We use various methods to weave the history of mathematics through all the courses in the major, culminating in our senior seminar. Other institutions looking for innovative ways to include history in their mathematics curriculum may wish to take this approach.
    PRIMUS: problems, resources, and issues in mathematics undergraduate studies 09/2014; 24(8).

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