Journal of Herbs Spices & Medicinal Plants

Description

Readers of this important, information-packed journal will gain a more complete understanding of the activities associated with these plants by access to current information in a format that is readily available. Investigators generating new knowledge are able to easily share their information with interested colleagues. Managers of food companies, food processing facilities, medical research laboratories, government agencies, and others interested in new chemicals, food additives, international trade, patents, and other items will be able to easily review new findings. Currently, research and other literature on herbs, spices, and medicinal plants is widely scattered in several journals, reports, monographs, and patents. The Journal of Herbs, Spices & Medicinal Plants serves as a focus point through which investigators and others may publish material of importance to the production, marketing, and utilization of these plants and associated extracts. This refereed and peer-reviewed journal makes relevant and efficient information retrieval possible internationally. Original articles and book reviews provide information of interest to an international audience of researchers, teachers, technicians, and managers involved with production and/or marketing of herbs, spices, and medicinal plants on these general topics: growth, development, horticulture, ecology, physiology, genetics, chemistry, economics. The journal is a forum in which recent research and other information associated with herbs, spices, and medicinal plants is shared. It also begins to establish a centralized historical literature record accessible by investigators within the international community that work with or have an interest in herbs, spices, and medicinal plants.

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  • 5-year impact
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  • Website
    Journal of Herbs, Spices, & Medicinal Plants website
  • Other titles
    Journal of herbs, spices & medicinal plants (Online), Journal of herbs, spices & medicinal plants, Journal of herbs, spices and medicinal plants
  • ISSN
    1049-6475
  • OCLC
    49969076
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Dehydrated peels from ash gourd (Benincasa hispida), ridge gourd (Luffa acutangula), and cho-chow marrow (Sechium edule) were analyzed for chemical composition and bioactive potential. The range of constituents per 100g dry peels were protein, 3 to 15 g; insoluble fiber, 45 to 58 g; ether extractives, 2.3 to 3.3 g; iron, 5.1 to 17.4 mg; calcium, 307 to 704 mg; tannins, 580 to 848 mg; carotenoids, 1,712 to 35,663 μg; and ascorbic acid, 37 to 51 mg. Polyphenols, total antioxidant activity, free radical scavenging activity (FRSA), and reducing power of peel were highest in aqueous extracts. FRSA of cho-chow marrow peel was the highest (87.32%) followed by ridge gourd (85.4%) and ash gourd (63.31%) peels that correlated well with bioactive components. Methanol and aqueous extracts of the peel exhibited bile acid binding (61%–98%) and α-amylase inhibitory activity.
    Journal of Herbs Spices & Medicinal Plants 04/2015; 21(2).
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    ABSTRACT: Pretreatment of Caco-2 cells with the bioaccessible fraction of bMO suppressed IL-1β-induced COX-2, IL-8 and MCP-1 and intracellular ROS content. Omission of bile extract during digestion decreased the extent of inhibitory effect of digested bMO on IL-1β activated IL-8 and MCP-1 production. Both lipophilic and hydrophilic compounds of bMO contribute to suppressive response to the pro-inflammatory insult, but only the hydrophilic compounds are responsible for its antioxidant activity. The suppressive effect of the bioaccessible fraction of bMO was partly modulated by inhibiting the phosphorylation of p-38 and IκB. These data provide supportive health promoting activity of M. oleifera pods on the gut.
    Journal of Herbs Spices & Medicinal Plants 04/2015; 21(2).
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    ABSTRACT: The in vitro effects of Combretum zeyheri leaf ethanol extract (CZLE) on ergosterol biosynthesis of Candida albicans were investigated by quantifying the ergosterol in C. albicans in the presence and absence of the extract using UV-visible spectrophotometric analyses. Miconazole was used as the positive control. CZLE showed ergosterol biosynthesis inhibition at sub-inhibitory concentration for growth of C. albicans and also at the MIC (0.08 mg.mL−1). The decrease in ergosterol in C. albicans cells was dose-dependant with 67%, 79%, and 100% after growing in 20, 40, and 80 μg.mL−1 of CZLE, respectively. CZLE exerted its fungicidal effects by targeting the ergosterol biosynthesis in C. albicans and disrupting the membrane integrity.
    Journal of Herbs Spices & Medicinal Plants 04/2015; 21(2).
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    ABSTRACT: Toxicity of aqueous extract (AE) of stem bark of Bauhinia variegata was evaluated. In the acute toxicity study, Sprague-Dawley rats were treated orally with AE (2,000 or 5,000 mg.kg−1 b.w). The animal behavior and mortality were observed periodically for up to 14 d. In the repeated dose toxicity study, the AE was administered daily at doses of 1,000 or 2,000 mg.kg−1 b.w, for 28 d. Behavior and mortality of animals were observed during the test period and hematological, biochemical parameters and histopathological examinations were carried out. In acute toxicity study, AE did not produce any mortality, changes in behavior, or any other physiological activities in rats at all selected doses. In repeated dose toxicity study, the monocytes and lymphocytes decreased at high doses. AE did not affect the biochemical parameters (except glucose) and the organs’ weight. Histopathology studies revealed no changes in cellular structure of the organs studied. The AE of B. variegata had maximally tolerated dose (MTD) of 5,000 mg.kg−1 in acute toxicity study and lowest observed adverse effect level of 1,000 mg.kg−1 in repeated-dose toxicity study in rats.
    Journal of Herbs Spices & Medicinal Plants 04/2015; 21(2).
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    ABSTRACT: In vitro antibacterial aptitude of Avicennia marina, A. marina var acutissima, Rhizophora mucronata, and R. annamalayana leaves were evaluated for urinary tract infective bacterial strains. A. marina var. acutissima and R. annamalayana methanolic extracts had diverse phytochemicals and demonstrated lower antibacterial activity at the concentrations of 100 to 250 μg.mL−1 and greater activity at 500 to 1,000 μg.mL−1. The minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration intensity of methanolic extracts were at 150 to 375 μg.mL−1. Alkaloids and genstine were noted in TLC fractionation, and their bioactivities were determined in bioautography analysis. Active functional groups OH alcoholic (hydrogen bond), C-H methylene, and C-O- aldehyde were present in both active guided fractions, but R2C=CH2 alkene and N-O nitraso groups were only in A. marina var. acutissima.
    Journal of Herbs Spices & Medicinal Plants 04/2015; 21(2).
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    ABSTRACT: The aerial parts of Thymus capitatus were examined for fungicidal activities and analyzed for their fatty acids concentrations, using trans-esterification and gas chromatography mass spectroscopy analysis. Fifteen fatty acids were identified, accounting for 95.0 % of the lipid content. Two major fatty acids, α-linolenic (29.6 %) and linoleic (15.1 %), were found in abundance in the hexane extract. The effect of fatty acids and hexane extract on the growth of the plant pathogenic fungi isolated by citrus fruits—Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus oryza, Penicillium digitatum, and Fusarium solani—fungi were examined by in vitro studies. The fatty acids and hexane extract inhibited the mycelial growth of all strains tested.
    Journal of Herbs Spices & Medicinal Plants 04/2015; 21(2).
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    ABSTRACT: The bio-active phenolic compounds in Alpinia galanga and A. calcarata were characterized by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectroscopy method. LC-MS/MS analysis showed that gallic acid and ellagic acid were the major phenolic compounds in A. galanga (320 and 518 mg.kg−1, respectively) and A. calcarata (75 and 1,200 mg.kg−1, respectively). The method was validated for its linearity, precision, and accuracy as well as sensitivity. A. galanga showed better free radical scavenging activity against DPPH. and ABTS+. with an IC50 value of 21.26 and 25.54 μ g.mL−1, respectively than A. calcarata (56.51 and 62.35 μ g.mL−1, respectively). The antioxidant activity of A. galanga may be due to higher amounts of phenolic compounds present in this plant.
    Journal of Herbs Spices & Medicinal Plants 04/2015; 21(2).
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    ABSTRACT: The antiulcer effect of Matricaria chamomilla flower head extracts were investigated on indomethacin-induced ulcer models in rats. All extracts exhibited antiulcer effect; the highest percent of inhibition was shown by the ethyl acetate and chloroform fractions (84, 80%) respectively, followed by petroleum ether and aqueous ethanol residue (57, 50%), respectively, while the total alcoholic extract showed 62%. Phytochemical investigation of the ethyl acetate fraction allowed isolation and identification of apigenin-7-methoxy -8-O-arabinopyranoside, apigenin -7-O-β-glucoside - 6″ acetate, apigenin-7-O-galactoside - 6″ acetate, and apigenin -7-O-β-glucoside, by NMR, mass analysis, and acid hydrolysis.
    Journal of Herbs Spices & Medicinal Plants 04/2015; 21(2).
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    ABSTRACT: Nature and amount of genetic variability, associations, and path coefficients were studied in the six traits of 45 genotypes of red sorrel. All the traits showed high heritability except medium for branches/plant (73.94), calyx yield (67.54 %), and low for seed yield (i.e., 41.85%), the highest being for days to flowers 50% (98.12 %) and lowest for seed yield/plot (41.85%). Seed yield/plot was significantly and positively correlated with plant height but negatively correlated with days to flower 50%. Fresh calyx yield is positively correlated with days to flower 50% followed by plant height, and branches/plant exhibited same trends at both genotypic and phenotypic level. However, only plant height and fresh calyx yield made the highest amount of direct and indirect contribution to seed yield/plot. Therefore, plant height and β-carotene serve as better selection criteria to improve red sorrel crop.
    Journal of Herbs Spices & Medicinal Plants 04/2015; 21(2).
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    ABSTRACT: Gas chromatography mass spectroscopy (GCMS) analysis of unsaponifiable matters of aerial parts of Dichrostachys cinerea revealed the identification of 34 compounds representing 93.67% of the total peak area. The main compounds were isophytol (25.43%), butylated hydroxyl toluene (15.08%), octadecene (8.57%), hexdecene (8.51%), 5-eicosene (6.86%), 3-tetradecene (4.30%), p.nonyl phenol (4.13%), 1-eicosanol (3.41%), and teracosene (2.74%). Thirty-one compounds representing 92.08% of the total peak area were identified by GCMS analysis of fatty acid methyl esters, the main compounds were methyl 9,12,15 octadecatrienoate (25.55%), methyl-12-hydroxy-9-octadecenoate (22.43%), methyl octadecanoate (6.31%), and methyl tetracosanoate (3.83%). Unsaturated fatty acids constituted 53.63% while saturated fatty acids constituted 38.45%. Analgesic and antipyretic activity of the total ethanol extract and successive extracts showed highest activities after 2 h by100 mg of total ethanol extract (80.87% potency) comparable to metamizol and the methanol extract (121.76% potency) comparable to paracetamol.
    Journal of Herbs Spices & Medicinal Plants 04/2015; 21(2).
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    ABSTRACT: Anti-ulcerogenic and gastric anti-secretory activity of aqueous extract of Cochorus olitorius was investigated in HCl/ethanol and indomethacin-induced gastric lesions in male albino rats. Pre-treatment with aqueous extract (50, 100, or 200 mg.kg−1) orally for 2 weeks reduced ulcer formation, except those pre-treated with 50 mg.kg− in the indomethacin model. In both models, the decrease in gastric acid production was dose-dependent.
    Journal of Herbs Spices & Medicinal Plants 01/2015; 21(1).
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    ABSTRACT: Present study focused the antidiabetic activity of n-hexane fraction of hydro-methanolic (2:3) extract of Swietenia mahagoni seed in steptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic rat. Significant increased in the levels of fasting blood glucose, glyclated hemoglobin and diminution in hepatic hexokinase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, catalase, peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and elevation in glucose-6-phosphatase activities in diabetic animals. Said biosensors were significantly recovered towards the control after treatment of n-hexane fraction than other fractions. Renotoxic (serum urea, uric acid and creatinine) and hematoxic (red blood cell count, platelet index and erythrocyte sedimentation rate) biosensors were significantly recovered towards control after n-hexane fraction treatment to diabetic group. Results suggest that n-hexane fraction has more potent non-toxic antidiabetic efficacy.
    Journal of Herbs Spices & Medicinal Plants 01/2015; 21(1).
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    ABSTRACT: The in vitro and in vivo antimicrobial activities of the methanolic leaves extract of Paullinia pinnata were evaluated. The phytochemical analyses revealed the presence of alkaloids, cardenolides, anthraquinones and tannins. The killing kinetic showed that the plant extract eliminated Pseudomonas aeruginosa (4 hr at 800 mg.mL−1) and Staphylococcus aureus (8 hr at 400 mg.mL−1). Groups A-C were infected and treated with 800, 400, and 200 mg.mL−1 of the plant extract with no observable tissue damage. Group D was infected but not treated and histopathological analysis of the organs showed some tissue damages. Paullinia pinnata could be a good alternative in the treatment of infections caused by these organisms.
    Journal of Herbs Spices & Medicinal Plants 01/2015; 21(1).
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    ABSTRACT: The fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy on the medicinal plants’ extracts used for the cure of diabetes in Eastern Himalayan region viz. Darjeeling and Sikkim are presented. The extracts from the seeds of Totola (Oroxylum indicum Vent.) and fruits of Harra (Terminalia chebula Retz.) and Barra (Terminalia belerica Roxb.) are studied using thin layer chromatography and atomic absorption spectroscopy. The results are compared with those of commercially prepared polyherbal formulations from Totola, Harra and Barra viz. Dashmool Kwath, Haritaki Churna and Triphala Churna.
    Journal of Herbs Spices & Medicinal Plants 01/2015; 21(1).
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    ABSTRACT: There is an increased demand for Chinese medicinal plants in the U.S., with little known about the feasibility of production of these species outside of China. The purpose of this study was to develop basic agronomic data for selected Chinese medicinal plant species. Agastache rugosa, Schizonepeta tenuifolia, Leonurus japonicus, and Leonurus sibiricus were grown in a randomized complete block design with 0, 100, or 200 kg.ha−1 of nitrogen (N). At 100 kg.ha−1 of N, a significant increase in yield of all species was observed as compared to the 0 kg.ha−1 control. Average dry yield per plant at 100 kg.ha−1 of N was 44.7 g for A. rugosa herb, 52.6 g for S. tenuifolia inflorescences, 42.7 g for L. japonicus basal rosette, and 46.9 g for L. sibiricus basal rosette. Yields of A. rugosa and both Leonurus species increased significantly again at 200 kg.ha−1 of N as compared to 100 kg.ha−1, while the increase in yield between these two levels was slight for S. tenuifolia. Results from these trials indicate that all four of the selected species are suitable for cultivation in the northeastern U.S.
    Journal of Herbs Spices & Medicinal Plants 01/2015; 21(1).
  • Journal of Herbs Spices & Medicinal Plants 10/2014;