Psychoanalytic Dialogues (PSYCHOANAL DIALOGUES )

Description

Even in 1991, its initial year of publication, PD was singled out by Newsweek as being at the center of a revitalization of psychoanalytic thinking. "With the infusion of new blood," Newsweek wrote, "a welcome hubbub of lectures, debates and competing ideas is being heard in the analytic marketplace again. Articles and books - many of them by women psychologists - are tumbling off the presses, and adding to the din is a provocative new journal, Psychoanalytic Dialogues, that has been airing fresh views on the relationship between doctor and patient and the psychoanalytic process itself." Since that time, PD has continued to explore the overlapping perspectives that regard relational configurations between self and others, real and fantasied, as the pathway to understanding human motivation and as the locus of psychodynamic explanation. These perspectives grow out of various traditions: interpersonal psychoanalysis; British object relations theories; self psychology; infancy research and child development; and contemporary Freudian thought.

  • Impact factor
    0.82
  • 5-year impact
    0.79
  • Cited half-life
    8.40
  • Immediacy index
    0.59
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.43
  • Website
    Psychoanalytic Dialogues website
  • Other titles
    Psychoanalytic dialogues
  • ISSN
    1048-1885
  • OCLC
    20863332
  • Material type
    Periodical
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: “Bill and Jane,” a couple I saw many years ago, are placeholders for all the anguished, angry, exhausting, and poignant partners who have made their mark on my work as a clinician and theorist. They inspired and defeated me in equal measure, and they ground this essay, which attempts to bring together many of the theories I have fallen in love with over the years. Psychoanalysis, feminist theory, and systems theory, of course, but also developmental and attachment theory, Fonagy’s work on mentalization, the strategic family therapies, and containing all of these, the relational turn. I have tried to capture the intellectual synergy of putting all these discourses to work, and to work on each other, all of which is necessary when treating couples on the brink.
    Psychoanalytic Dialogues 07/2014; 24(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Examining the approach to couples work described by Virginia Goldner, this commentary analyzes a number of the most significant interventions introduced by Goldner, pointing to her skillful use of paradox, the ways in which her focus on her own participation in the events of the session enables the members of the couple to take more responsibility in ways that point toward repair, and the ways her interventions share properties with what I have elsewhere called attributional interpretations. The paper also offers a critique of the ways in which the metaphors of left-brain and right-brain can be overused and misleading.
    Psychoanalytic Dialogues 07/2014; 24(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This response first addresses the interimplication of attachment and recognition in couples work and reargues that disorganized attachment is the central dynamic underlying the emotional torment of failing relationships. In the second section, the author expands upon the secondary trauma that haunts the therapist who is trying to hold and contain the destructiveness that couples “on the brink” can enact.
    Psychoanalytic Dialogues 07/2014; 24(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper presents our clinical experience with patients who were severely traumatized by the systematic violation of human rights during the military dictatorship in Chile (1973–1990). The lack of recognition of trauma of sociopolitical origin encapsulates the traumatic experience and forces it to remain as part of the present. Clinical vignettes of two therapeutic processes—mother and son—are presented: The mother was detained; sexually tortured; and, as a result of this, gave birth to the torturer’s son. Her therapeutic process is an account of her ambivalence towards her son, of how his origins were kept a family secret, and of how this secret was unconsciously transmitted. The young man’s therapeutic process centers on the transgenerational transmission of trauma and how the torturer–tortured dynamic seeps into the relationship with the analyst. The impact on the analysts’ subjectivity in working with extreme trauma is described.
    Psychoanalytic Dialogues 07/2014; 24(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Virginia Goldner’s paper reflects her exceptional role as a leader in both the family therapy and relational psychoanalytic worlds. Integrating those domains with theory and attachment and affect regulation, she presents a vivid and elegant theoretical perspective with an acutely empathic and self-reflective account of a torturous case. Commentaries by Leslie Greenberg and Paul Wachtel follow, along with a reply from Goldner.
    Psychoanalytic Dialogues 07/2014; 24(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The author takes up Csillag’s idea of sadism as the wish to penetrate in the context of a patient who withholds from his analyst. With such a patient, the analyst has to bear the strain stemming from a lack of both satisfaction and recognition–the feeling of not having an impact. The defenses against sadism are examined along with the absence of intentionality in both clinical cases presented, an absence that places sadism in the realm of something that is unconscious or preconscious. Alternative views are offered on the enactment between Csillag and her patient with a focus on the unspoken negotiation of desire and (drawing on Fairbairn) the analyst’s attempt to breach her patient’s closed system of internal objects.
    Psychoanalytic Dialogues 07/2014; 24(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Csillag challenges us to consider the presence and impact of the analyst’s sadism in the clinical encounter. Her theme usefully adds to the literature on the analyst’s countertransference and pushes us to look harder at ourselves. I distinguish between sadistic intent and experienced sadistic impact and suggest that Csillag is mostly speaking about the latter. Additionally, I address the absence of analytic restraint as a professional ideal that might moderate our slide to sadism in the countertransference.
    Psychoanalytic Dialogues 07/2014; 24(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In this comment I applaud Goldner’s ability to capture couple experience and dynamics while emphasizing that coupling involves more than attachment. In my view, couple conflict and therapy involves attending not only to attachment, which involves closeness and the threat of separation, but also to issues of identity, self-definition, and shame. I point out how some of the interactions and dynamics in the case discussed involve a threat to identity through invalidation more than to attachment by abandonment. As Goldner notes, mutual recognition between people is the cornerstone of the relational ideal, and it is for recognition through being seen, and validated for which Bill and Jane fight so hard, not closeness. In my view not everything in couples is about regulating attachment; rather everything is probably about regulating affect. Attachment is one, but only one, of the ways couples regulate their affect.
    Psychoanalytic Dialogues 07/2014; 24(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In her response to commentaries by Joyce Slochower and Christopher Bonovitz, the author further clarifies her understanding of countertransferential sadism and how it compares to other enactments. She addresses Slochower’s concern about psychoanalytic restraint in the relational frame. The author responds to Bonovitz, who used a Fairbairnian perspective to comment on the clinical material she presented, and she considers how Fairbairn’s concepts of the libidinal ego, the rejecting object and the internal saboteur apply to analytic sadism. Finally, she contemplates whether the sadistic enactments described in her paper can be viewed as a prelude to the expansion of analytic love.
    Psychoanalytic Dialogues 07/2014; 24(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The analyst’s retaliatory sadism can be construed as a perversion of the wish to penetrate, just as masochism can be viewed as a degradation of the desire to surrender. When a patient refuses to speak any other language but that of domination and submission, ordinary attempts for communication and recognition fail. In her attempt to reach the patient, to reinstate herself as an active agent and subject, and also to dislodge the patient from a rut of despair, passivity, or malignity, the analyst may escalate to a sadistic response, even if she suspects that this might cause the patient pain. This type of sadomasochistic enactment can gather strength when disowned self-states of analyst and analysand are activated. In this process, an analytic interpretation, seemingly legitimate, can be used as a knife, a weapon, an instrument of retaliation and sadistic control. The disastrous potential of the analyst’s sadism is easy to imagine. Through a couple of clinical vignettes I will demonstrate that even something as lamentable as the analyst’s sadistic retaliation can lead to growth as long as such sadism can enter the analytic dialogue and the patient is allowed to perceive and reflect upon the analytic misbehavior, and the analyst is willing to join the patient in the quest to understand their co-created predicament.
    Psychoanalytic Dialogues 07/2014; 24(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper presents some comments about the clinical case treated by two Chilean psychoanalysts in the period of violation of human rights, Isidora and her son Martín. We should recognize the pain of listening as psychoanalysts to this kind of story reopens our own wounds, which reappear again, showing some of the toughest realities in the curtailment of personal freedoms like torture, abuse, and violence, which strip away the subject’s identity and any consideration of their selfhood. All therapists or analysts who work in such a situation, whether or not they have been through similar traumas, will be included, affected, and pierced by the social and cultural context. In these cases, it is not only the patient and her internal world that is being treated, but the analysts as well, as they are not outsiders to the conflict. Analyze patients like this case or similar cases could be a possible or sometimes an impossible challenge?
    Psychoanalytic Dialogues 07/2014; 24(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This introduction to a panel presented in Santiago, Chile, highlights the consequences of social violence focusing on the need for institutionalized action to counteract institutional violence, on the interaction of vulnerabilities of patient and therapist expressed as enactments in the treatment, and on the complex interplay of risk and resilience mediating repetition of trauma.
    Psychoanalytic Dialogues 07/2014; 24(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: When both therapist and patient have shared the experiences of living in contexts of extreme and continuous trauma, the effects of this will be woven into their relationship and their work together both at a conscious and an unconscious level. This paper explores these effects in the sensitive and insightful case studies presented by Castillo and Cordal as they struggle to come to terms with the aftermath on the dictatorship in Chile. Parallels are drawn with work in South Africa both during and after Apartheid.
    Psychoanalytic Dialogues 07/2014; 24(4).
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    ABSTRACT: The peculiarity of Orna Guralnik’s case study lay in the fact that the German patient whose grandparents were Nazis and whose parents were in their ideas affected by Nazi ideology is being treated by a Jewish analyst. Both patient and analyst belong to the so-called third generation. In my commentary I emphasize the significance of processes of transgenerational identification, and I try to show how a countertransference enactment developed in this treatment. The burden of the traumatic history of the Germans and the Jews was, in this case, too heavy and preoccupied the analyst. Such countertransference enactments occur repeatedly during psychoanalytic treatment when the subject is about involvement in the Holocaust and Second World War and its consequences for subsequent generations.
    Psychoanalytic Dialogues 01/2014; 24(2).
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    ABSTRACT: This paper is an exploration of anger and its potential to impede or facilitate creative or analytic process. Conceptually I consider anger in terms of cognitive-affective linking and unlinking, and transference-countertransference enactments, and the repetition compulsion as an encoded “second language,” with reference to neuroscience research findings. At its experiential center, this paper tells the story of a story that could not be told about anger in a distressed clinical process.
    Psychoanalytic Dialogues 01/2014; 24(1).
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    ABSTRACT: The metaphor of depth has most often been used in analytic thinking to denote extension in space or time. Depth, and its companion term deepening, may also be used to describe quality rather than distance; something is deep when it is serious or important. The deepening of analysis is linked to temporality but not in a linear way. Analysis deepens as it sets in motion a series of changes in the experience of time: The past comes alive and is worked through. Past and present come into a new relation with one another. The analytic frame and the rhythm of the exchange between patient and analyst also bring to life past experiences and fantasies to do with time. Both patient and analyst must enter a fluid time-state in order for deepening to occur. Clinical examples illustrate these dimensions of temporal experience and the way they emerge in the deepening analytic process.
    Psychoanalytic Dialogues 01/2014; 24(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Freud was interested in and eventually accepted the diverse forms of telepathic communication as psychoanalytic rather than occult phenomena, particularly as manifested in dreams. Massicotte revisits the topic of Freud and his interest in the occult in a manner that invites serious reconsideration of this aspect of his work, long the subject of intense controversy in the history of psychoanalysis. In my response to Massicotte’s paper I argue that Freud’s interest in telepathy or thought transference belongs to his psychoanalytic theories of the unconscious and transference. His approach to telepathy parallels his approach to religious beliefs: He accounts for both as creations of the human mind as individuals attempt to make sense and meaning of their real experiences. What Freud meant by telepathy is what contemporary psychoanalysis refers to as unconscious communication, and the strange, often inexplicable forms it takes in clinical contexts. For Freud, instances of telepathy or unconscious communication are to be understood contextually and relationally, revealing important data about the nature of affectively charged human relationships.
    Psychoanalytic Dialogues 01/2014; 24(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Although these papers by Stuart and Barbara Pizer might initially seem unrelated, I find in them a deep complementarity, presenting an interlocking approach to analytic stance or attitude and analytic process. Both papers are responses to the totalizing nature of knowing that can reduce our ineffable subjectivity to chattel, to be used as spare parts in the service of avoiding the existential agonies of our own vulnerability in the face of death. I see generous involvement as a contemporary formulation of neutrality and as a necessary foundational stance for an analytic process captured eloquently by the notion of moving feeling forward, a process of de-totalizing, of opening a generous experience of the other as an irreducible mystery.
    Psychoanalytic Dialogues 01/2014; 24(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper examines how images of depth are employed in the psychoanalytic literature and how they illuminate or obfuscate. It examines as well the price of using familiar terminologies to introduce new ideas, a practice more common in psychoanalysis than in many other disciplines. By obscuring the differences between old ideas and new through using the same terminology for both, the sense of adherence and belonging to the psychoanalytic community is enhanced but the ability to see fully the new possibilities for theory and practice to which these new ideas point is constrained. In elaborating on this point, the paper also considers the differences between a past-centered, archaeological model and a model in which older patterns are perpetuated through their repeated consequences, both intended and unintended. In such a model both action and perception are taken into account, as the aim of analysis becomes not just the patient’s internal world but her lived life.
    Psychoanalytic Dialogues 01/2014; 24(3).

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