Psychoanalytic Dialogues (PSYCHOANAL DIALOGUES )

Description

Even in 1991, its initial year of publication, PD was singled out by Newsweek as being at the center of a revitalization of psychoanalytic thinking. "With the infusion of new blood," Newsweek wrote, "a welcome hubbub of lectures, debates and competing ideas is being heard in the analytic marketplace again. Articles and books - many of them by women psychologists - are tumbling off the presses, and adding to the din is a provocative new journal, Psychoanalytic Dialogues, that has been airing fresh views on the relationship between doctor and patient and the psychoanalytic process itself." Since that time, PD has continued to explore the overlapping perspectives that regard relational configurations between self and others, real and fantasied, as the pathway to understanding human motivation and as the locus of psychodynamic explanation. These perspectives grow out of various traditions: interpersonal psychoanalysis; British object relations theories; self psychology; infancy research and child development; and contemporary Freudian thought.

  • Impact factor
    0.82
  • 5-year impact
    0.79
  • Cited half-life
    8.40
  • Immediacy index
    0.59
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.43
  • Website
    Psychoanalytic Dialogues website
  • Other titles
    Psychoanalytic dialogues
  • ISSN
    1048-1885
  • OCLC
    20863332
  • Material type
    Periodical
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In this panel Emanuel Berman and Joan Sarnat present examples of supervisions in which anxieties disrupted their work with psychoanalytic candidates. These authors, as well as discussants Franco Borgogno and Tony Bass, concur about the importance of enlarging the scope of the supervisory process beyond the traditional focus on the patient and on supervisee countertransference, narrowly defined, when such disruptions occur.
    Psychoanalytic Dialogues 09/2014; 24(5).
  • Psychoanalytic Dialogues 09/2014; 24(5).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In this commentary on the supervisory experiences presented by Joan Sarnat and Emanuel Berman, the author mainly focuses on the following issues: the fear of facing the negative feelings and the consequences of this fear in the patient, in the candidate, and in the supervisor; on the intrapsychic/interpsychic dynamics of role-reversal in transference–countertransference; on the tendency to use either intellectual and “jargon” interpretations or metaphors without before asking ourselves whether if the patient can comprehend them or whether, on the contrary, these kinds of communications leave the patient even more disorientated and confused. Further considerations are suggested on the fruitfulness of applying “a long wave perspective” in reading the analytical material and on which an ideal “good enough” work of supervision could be intended.
    Psychoanalytic Dialogues 09/2014; 24(5).
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    ABSTRACT: The beginning of the Italian “relational turn” dates back to the translation, in 1986, of Greenberg and Mitchell’s Object Relations in Psychoanalytic Theory. The authors illustrate how the Italian psychodynamic world received this book and the following contributions from the relational colleagues from the United States. In particular, they review the last three decades of Italian psychoanalytic publications (both journals and books) and training programs (both private and public schools), showing the increasing presence of relational elements and the specific ways in which they appear, sometime facing hostility and devaluation. Nowadays, thanks to the pioneering work of a determinate and passionate group of psychoanalysts and editorial consultants, we can say that the relational turn in Italy is a “matter of fact” and the relational approach one of the most influential voices in the Italian psychoanalytic and psychodynamic community.
    Psychoanalytic Dialogues 09/2014; 24(5).
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    ABSTRACT: In this paper we attempt to describe how the relational model spread in Italy primarily from the microcosm of the Institute that we founded—ISIPSÉ—and in which we tried to create a community within which we could study the contemporary theories and meet the psychoanalysts who gave life to the relational movement. We describe a process of creating a cultural space that allows us to dialogue directly with those who contributed to the evolution of contemporary psychoanalysis. Today in psychoanalytic literature the growing importance of the implicit refers primarily to the importance of the body in the analytic relationship. Therefore we believe that in the training of therapists attention for an embodied, physical transmission of psychoanalysis makes the transition from theory to clinical situation more consistent and smoother.
    Psychoanalytic Dialogues 09/2014; 24(5).
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    ABSTRACT: Muriel Dimen replies to Adam Phillips’s interest in her understanding of psychoanalysis. She focuses on psychoanalysis—its method, thought, and practice—as all interminable, as process, as becoming.
    Psychoanalytic Dialogues 09/2014; 24(5).
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    ABSTRACT: This essay situates Freud’s “‘Wild’ Analysis” in its local and global histories, even while reading it for what it can tell us about psychoanalysis now. Even as it is taken on its own terms, this essay serves also as a means to consider psychoanalysis as host to crucial tensions, its ideas and their relation to technique, its traffic in power, and sexuality and the primal crime. Using a clinical vignette, the essay argues the heterogeneity and multiplicity inherent to psychoanalysis are a gift to later generations, even if they made trouble for Freud. In celebration and critique, it examines, in effect, where Freud was and where psychoanalysis is now.
    Psychoanalytic Dialogues 09/2014; 24(5).
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    ABSTRACT: This paper explores the influences of a heterogeneous psychoanalytic training setting, such as the Israel Psychoanalytic Institute, on the individual supervision of trainees. While this kind of institute reduces the dangers of submission, uniformity and indoctrination, it creates its own difficulties, “the perils of diversity.” The examples offered include the impact of divergent views of analyzability; aspirations encouraged by certain theoretical models, which may be frustrated in a supervision guided by different views; and controversies regarding psychoanalytic technique, which may confuse a candidate and create inconsistency vis-à-vis the analysand. The open joint exploration of such issues, and of their influence on the supervisory process, is strongly recommended.
    Psychoanalytic Dialogues 09/2014; 24(5).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This discussion of papers by Sarnat and Berman on psychoanalytic supervision explores the complex nature of the contemporary psychoanalytic supervisory relationship. It considers how developments in psychoanalytic theory and practice, reflecting relational, intersubjective, attachment, and field theory influences over the past 30 years, have changed the ways in which many analysts practice and theorize supervision. Contemporary supervisors attend not just to the patient being presented, or to the therapeutic dyad, but to the supervisory relationship itself as part of the clinical/supervisory frame of reference. Similarities and differences between therapy and supervision are considered.
    Psychoanalytic Dialogues 09/2014; 24(5).
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    ABSTRACT: This conjunction is fraught with danger, with difficulties, and with irreconcilables. I discuss three examples: (a) very briefly, the Soviet Union, where psychoanalysis, established before the October Revolution, came finally to be abolished, as incompatible with Soviet-enforced psychological theory; (b) somewhat more, Nazi Germany, where psychoanalysis struggled to survive in a truncated and grossly distorted form, as a Nazi-sponsored “Aryanized” depth-psychology stripped of Freud’s name and of its necessary conditions of safety and confidentiality; and (c) in considerable detail, my personal experiences on behalf of the International Psychoanalytical Association, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, dealing, after the overthrow of the military junta that had ruled in the 1970s, with the psychoanalytic aftermath, the complete breakdown of the analytic society’s functioning consequent to the shielding of a government torturer during the dictatorship years.
    Psychoanalytic Dialogues 09/2014; 24(5).
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    ABSTRACT: In our contribution we would like to highlight that the model formulated by Mitchell in his last book entitled Relationality seems to suggest that he had come to realize that he could not exclude attachment theory entirely from his theoretical framework. Some of the most interesting interpretations of it—post-Bowlbian interpretations—regarded the dynamics of early attachment as a fundamental model of emotional regulation. We think that in Italy there has always been a significantly widespread sensitivity toward developmental and attachment themes also in more strictly psychoanalytic contexts, hence the specific slant of our reading of the most recent developments in relational psychoanalysis.
    Psychoanalytic Dialogues 09/2014; 24(5).
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    ABSTRACT: The phrase “wild analysis” is evaluated with a view to understanding something about the conditions and constraints on psychoanalytic theory and practice. Muriel Dimen’s paper is also read as a prologue for new, less restrictive stories about the nature of psychoanalysis.
    Psychoanalytic Dialogues 09/2014; 24(5).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper describes the author’s supervision of a psychoanalytic candidate, including the development and resolution of impasse in both the supervised analysis and the supervisory relationship. When the author became aware of the degree to which her own anxieties and defenses were implicated, she sought consultation, after which both supervision and analysis moved forward. As supervision continued, work on supervisee’s and supervisor’s interlocking anxieties and defenses, and understanding of their impact on the supervised analysis, deepened. The author concludes that exploring supervisory disruptions allows both members of the supervisory dyad to come to grips with conflicts that subtly distort their work and facilitates a deepening of the supervised analysis.
    Psychoanalytic Dialogues 09/2014; 24(5).
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    ABSTRACT: In this comment I applaud Goldner’s ability to capture couple experience and dynamics while emphasizing that coupling involves more than attachment. In my view, couple conflict and therapy involves attending not only to attachment, which involves closeness and the threat of separation, but also to issues of identity, self-definition, and shame. I point out how some of the interactions and dynamics in the case discussed involve a threat to identity through invalidation more than to attachment by abandonment. As Goldner notes, mutual recognition between people is the cornerstone of the relational ideal, and it is for recognition through being seen, and validated for which Bill and Jane fight so hard, not closeness. In my view not everything in couples is about regulating attachment; rather everything is probably about regulating affect. Attachment is one, but only one, of the ways couples regulate their affect.
    Psychoanalytic Dialogues 07/2014; 24(4).
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    ABSTRACT: The author takes up Csillag’s idea of sadism as the wish to penetrate in the context of a patient who withholds from his analyst. With such a patient, the analyst has to bear the strain stemming from a lack of both satisfaction and recognition–the feeling of not having an impact. The defenses against sadism are examined along with the absence of intentionality in both clinical cases presented, an absence that places sadism in the realm of something that is unconscious or preconscious. Alternative views are offered on the enactment between Csillag and her patient with a focus on the unspoken negotiation of desire and (drawing on Fairbairn) the analyst’s attempt to breach her patient’s closed system of internal objects.
    Psychoanalytic Dialogues 07/2014; 24(4).
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    ABSTRACT: In her response to commentaries by Joyce Slochower and Christopher Bonovitz, the author further clarifies her understanding of countertransferential sadism and how it compares to other enactments. She addresses Slochower’s concern about psychoanalytic restraint in the relational frame. The author responds to Bonovitz, who used a Fairbairnian perspective to comment on the clinical material she presented, and she considers how Fairbairn’s concepts of the libidinal ego, the rejecting object and the internal saboteur apply to analytic sadism. Finally, she contemplates whether the sadistic enactments described in her paper can be viewed as a prelude to the expansion of analytic love.
    Psychoanalytic Dialogues 07/2014; 24(4).
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    ABSTRACT: This paper presents some comments about the clinical case treated by two Chilean psychoanalysts in the period of violation of human rights, Isidora and her son Martín. We should recognize the pain of listening as psychoanalysts to this kind of story reopens our own wounds, which reappear again, showing some of the toughest realities in the curtailment of personal freedoms like torture, abuse, and violence, which strip away the subject’s identity and any consideration of their selfhood. All therapists or analysts who work in such a situation, whether or not they have been through similar traumas, will be included, affected, and pierced by the social and cultural context. In these cases, it is not only the patient and her internal world that is being treated, but the analysts as well, as they are not outsiders to the conflict. Analyze patients like this case or similar cases could be a possible or sometimes an impossible challenge?
    Psychoanalytic Dialogues 07/2014; 24(4).
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    ABSTRACT: When both therapist and patient have shared the experiences of living in contexts of extreme and continuous trauma, the effects of this will be woven into their relationship and their work together both at a conscious and an unconscious level. This paper explores these effects in the sensitive and insightful case studies presented by Castillo and Cordal as they struggle to come to terms with the aftermath on the dictatorship in Chile. Parallels are drawn with work in South Africa both during and after Apartheid.
    Psychoanalytic Dialogues 07/2014; 24(4).
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    ABSTRACT: This introduction to a panel presented in Santiago, Chile, highlights the consequences of social violence focusing on the need for institutionalized action to counteract institutional violence, on the interaction of vulnerabilities of patient and therapist expressed as enactments in the treatment, and on the complex interplay of risk and resilience mediating repetition of trauma.
    Psychoanalytic Dialogues 07/2014; 24(4).