Journal of Multicultural Social Work (J Multicult Soc Work )

Description

No longer published. Now known as Journal of Ethnic & Cultural Diversity in Social Work

  • Impact factor
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  • 5-year impact
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  • Cited half-life
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  • Immediacy index
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  • Eigenfactor
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  • Article influence
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  • Website
    Journal of Multicultural Social Work website
  • Other titles
    Journal of multicultural social work
  • ISSN
    1042-8224
  • OCLC
    19225114
  • Material type
    Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Despite the controversy surrounding transracial adoptions, they continue to occur. Social workers in adoptions services must have a keen sense of the theoretical and practice issues that confront them and the consequent mandate to enable prospective non-minority parents to address the racial-cultural identity needs of the minority child they are adopting. An ecological framework elucidates these issues. The paper outlines examples of how adopting parents must comprehend and address the unique needs of their minority child.
    Journal of Multicultural Social Work 11/2010; 1(2):17-32.
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    ABSTRACT: It has been twenty years since Robert Hill's seminal research on Black family strengths revolutionized the perceptions, attitudes and modalities related to the coping abilities of Black people. His findings were instrumental in effecting changes in a body of knowledge from one that focused on a monolithic, ethnocentric deficit model to one that affirmed strengths within an historical, culturally diverse conceptual framework. Much of the information available is theoretically based on the Euro-centric worldview resulting in limited use, acceptance and credibility among social work practitioners, social policy analysts and social work academicians. This paper revisits the literature relative to the strengths of Black families. Utilizing recent works of Billingsley (1990), Boyd-Franklin (1989) and others, the strengths of Black families will be re-examined for the purposes of comparing Hill's strength model with the contemporary model of African-American families and its implications for social work education, practice and policy. Additionally, new imperatives are described that possibly will insure African-Americans greater power and control over life situations in the decade of the 90s and into the twenty-first century.
    Journal of Multicultural Social Work 11/2010; 2(4):23-36.
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    ABSTRACT: The contributions of African-Americans have been omitted from social work. This paper notes selected pioneer black women who can be ranked with such white pioneers as Dorothea Dix or Mary Richmond. Katy Ferguson and Cynthia Lugenia Burns Hope were exciting contributors in meeting the health, education, and welfare needs of African-Americans and others. they were innovative in their approach-spanning the free and slave communities of the black experience. Black women were movers, shakers, and ground breakers in developing the dual system of social welfare. They shoudl be included in courses of history/policy, methods, human behavior, and research, and there should be courses on African-American women. They have been on the leading edge in individual and institutional responses to human needs. Ignoring their myriad contributions is indeed a sin.
    Journal of Multicultural Social Work 11/2010; 1(2):1-16.
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    ABSTRACT: Increasing attention must be given to the psychosocial needs of families with HIV-infected mothers, especially as it relates to permanency planning for children who survive their infected parent(s). Since these families are disproportionately African-American, developing culturally-appropriate services is paramount. Norwood (1988) projected between 52,272 and 72,000 uninfected children will be orphaned in New York City. In Michigan, to understand this problem better, a retrospective chart review utilizing Norwood's model was performed of the families of the 83 infants whose cord blood was positive for maternal HIV antibodies or who were congenitally infected with HIV.
    Journal of Multicultural Social Work 09/2009; 2(3):85-106.
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    ABSTRACT: No abstract available for this article.
    Journal of Multicultural Social Work 09/2009; 2(3):1-7.
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    ABSTRACT: No abstract available for this article.
    Journal of Multicultural Social Work 10/2008; 1(1):101-104.
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    ABSTRACT: Cambodian, Laotian and Vietnamese refugees who have come to North American host countries via the South Asian camps have been exposed to many potentially traumatic events and have been submitted to an alienating migration process. A comprehensive analysis of their experience both in refugee camps and North American host countries is facilitated by the use of various stress theories. The stressors of change, acculturation, bereavement and trauma are identified with regard to the migration process of the Indochinese refugees as well as to the pre- and post-migration period. Some implications for practice in social, physical and mental health settings are underlined: in particular a sensitivity to the meaning of physical illness within this population, to the cultural reticence towards mental health consultation, to the possibility of longterm vulnerability to post-traumatic stress disorders and to increasing value conflicts within the family. Intervention experiences both in the South Asian refugee camps and in North American host countries suggests the importance of traditional healers and natural support networks.
    Journal of Multicultural Social Work 10/2008; 2(1):15-30.
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    ABSTRACT: This paper reports on an "Action Research Study" on youth violence. The study was conducted in the sixth largest city in the U.S. It was carried out with twenty youth between the ages of 13 and 17 years who had been adjudicated for acts of violence ranging from 'assualt with intent to commit great bodily harm,' to out right murder. The data was obtained by extensive indepth personal interview using an instrument designed especially for this study. The data were examined using a SPSSx descriptive statistics package. Results are analyzed and findings discussed. Social Work education implications were discussed.
    Journal of Multicultural Social Work 10/2008; 1(3):33-44.
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    ABSTRACT: Social work research and practice has relatively little, if any, empirical literature oe the worldviews of Filipino Americans. Using a probability sample design, this study explored the locus of control of 216 Filipino Americans. The findings indicate that Filipino Americans are characterized by both an internal and external orientation. Sociodemographic variables were found to be significantly related to locus of control. Information on Filipino American history2 culture, and sociopolitical factors is offered to examine and explain statistical findings.
    Journal of Multicultural Social Work 10/2008; 6(1):59-76.
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    ABSTRACT: In a grounded-theory study of poetry by mainland Puerto Ricans, a vivid picture of their identity emerges, an identity proudly ethnocultural yet oppressed. This paper presents the method of grounded theory, and the findings of that study, and argues that similar analysis of the literatures of all ethnocultural groups is a valid and powerful means for extending social work knowledge.
    Journal of Multicultural Social Work 10/2008; 4(3):69-79.
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    ABSTRACT: A sample of 289 Chinese American and 138 White students from a university campus was recruited from social science courses to complete a survey on perceptions of and experiences with dating violence and gender role beliefs. White students were more likely to define dating violence as physical and sexual aggression compared to the Chinese American students. Although the majority of students from both ethnic groups did not agree that dating violence is justified under various circumstances, the Chinese American students were more likely to provide a contextual justification for the use of dating violence. Findings also indicated that 20% of Chinese American students and 31.3% of the White students have experienced some form of physical dating violence since they started dating. For both the Chinese American and White students, those who were more likely to agree that various acts of physical aggression are considered dating violence were less likely to perpetrate physical dating violence in the last 12 months. The sociocultural context of dating violence and implications for practice and research are discussed.
    Journal of Multicultural Social Work 10/2008; 8(1):101-129.
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    ABSTRACT: This cross-sectional survey study examined the relationship between exposure to war traumas and community violence and academic, behavioral, and psychological well-being among Khmer refugee adolescents. The 144 adolescents studied were exposed to high rates of violence. One third had symptoms indicative of PTSD and two thirds had symptoms indicative of clinical depression. The number of violent events they were exposed to significantly predicted their level of PTSD, personal risk behaviors, and GPA, but not their level of depression or behavior problems reported at school. Perceived social support made a difference in the lives of these youth and predicted better outcomes. The implications for research and practice are discussed.
    Journal of Multicultural Social Work 10/2008; 8(1):15-46.
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    ABSTRACT: This study compares the practice significance of two distinct models of traditional helping: a religiously inspired Protestant approach in late nineteenth century Toronto, Canada; and the Dervish, a religiously imbued traditional helper in a contemporary Bedouin Muslim community in the Negev, Israel Among major similarities are gender inclusiveness, the lack of explicit restrictions on the basis of age or education, the enabling of women as helpers to overcome predominant social constructions of gender, and a religious basis of the helping process itself. Differences were found in the acquisition of social status, and in methodologies of helping. One way for social work to be more sensitive to traditional populations is to realize the commonalities which exist among “modem” and “traditional” helping models.
    Journal of Multicultural Social Work 10/2008; 4(2):31-45.
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    ABSTRACT: This paper outlines key concerns for social sendee agencies working toward the establishment of an anti-racist organization. The spectrum of barriers at the individual, client-professional, organizational and community levels will be presented. These issues will be surfaced for the purpose of alerting professionals and administrators to both the discrete and concomitant sets of multicultural issues that can affect an organization's functioning. Moving towards an anti-racist stance requires: (1) awareness of those issues impacting the agency's capacity for serviceability, psychological safety and a value added environment for the worker, the consumer and the neighboring community; and (2) a willingness to seek out expert consultation and information about a needed process of sustained diversity intervention.
    Journal of Multicultural Social Work 10/2008; 4(1):35-48.
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    ABSTRACT: Cause and prevention of child mortality (ages 1-5) has received only a little attention. Studies show that the cause of infant mortality (birth-1) differs from the cause of chid mortality. This finding suggests that programs for preventing childhood death should have different approaches.
    Journal of Multicultural Social Work 10/2008; 4(1):63-74.
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    ABSTRACT: Recent studies involving practitioners, field instructors, and social work educators have acknowledged the importance of religious and spiritual issues when dealing with clients. These articles also have pointed to the dearth of information on these topics in the social work curriculum. This study examines students' perceived needs for information in these areas. Suggestions for imparting information on matters of spiritual and religious diversity are presented.
    Journal of Multicultural Social Work 10/2008; 7(3):129-145.
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    ABSTRACT: New information on elder mistreatment and conflict management among certain ethnic groups has necessitated changes in the practice arena. Clinical approaches depend on the victims' ability to identify themselves as victims, their degree of collective self, preferred conflict management techniques, and ability to identify their own power resources. Practice considerations and modifications include looking for subtle behaviors indicative of psychological abuse and neglect, using words that are culturally familiar and acceptable, and educating elders and their families about how other families relate and solve problems. Other interventions involve the use of the third party for cathartic displacement, and based on a temporal model of the exchange process, creating a power balance by maximizing the victims' potential power while minimizing the perpetrators' potential power.
    Journal of Multicultural Social Work 10/2008; 8(3):305-326.
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    ABSTRACT: A survey of 300 Nevada mental health, child welfare, early childhood, and parole workers provided baseline information concerning multicultural competence for use in planning diversity programs. A modified version of the Multicultural Counseling Inventory yielded data on awareness, knowledge, skills, and relationship. Significant findings emerged for gender, educational level, practice field, and minority status. Women scored higher than men on the total and three subscales. Workers with graduate degrees scored higher than BA level workers on the total and two subscales. Early childhood workers scored highest on the total; youth parole scored lowest. Minority workers scored higher than non-minority workers in awareness.
    Journal of Multicultural Social Work 10/2008; 4(4):67-83.
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    ABSTRACT: Six months after the Tiananmen Square crackdown, the author traveled to China. This overview is her perception of the highly structured, but ever-changing social welfare system in the People's Republic of China.
    Journal of Multicultural Social Work 10/2008; 1(4):91-98.
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    ABSTRACT: There has been an influx of Southeast Asian refugees to the United States over the past 20 years, many of whom have experienced severe trauma. In their new country they face the formidable task of acculturation into a new, unfamiliar culture, often separated from their families and ethnic groups. This study sought to answer the question of whether the severity of trauma endured prior to and during migration affects the level of acculturative stress in a community sample of Cambodian refugees. Two major variables, the experience of trauma and acculturative stress, were examined through a cross-sectional research design which employed multiple regression statistical techniques to analyze the data. The results of the present study established that Cambodian refugees who experienced severe trauma prior to resettlement in the United States had significantly higher levels of acculturative stress than did those with less severe trauma histories.
    Journal of Multicultural Social Work 10/2008; 6(3):27-46.