Journal of Multicultural Social Work Impact Factor & Information

Journal description

No longer published. Now known as Journal of Ethnic & Cultural Diversity in Social Work

Current impact factor: 0.00

Impact Factor Rankings

Additional details

5-year impact 0.00
Cited half-life 0.00
Immediacy index 0.00
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.00
Website Journal of Multicultural Social Work website
Other titles Journal of multicultural social work
ISSN 1042-8224
OCLC 19225114
Material type Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publications in this journal

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    ABSTRACT: The contributions of African-Americans have been omitted from social work. This paper notes selected pioneer black women who can be ranked with such white pioneers as Dorothea Dix or Mary Richmond. Katy Ferguson and Cynthia Lugenia Burns Hope were exciting contributors in meeting the health, education, and welfare needs of African-Americans and others. they were innovative in their approach-spanning the free and slave communities of the black experience. Black women were movers, shakers, and ground breakers in developing the dual system of social welfare. They shoudl be included in courses of history/policy, methods, human behavior, and research, and there should be courses on African-American women. They have been on the leading edge in individual and institutional responses to human needs. Ignoring their myriad contributions is indeed a sin.
    Journal of Multicultural Social Work 11/2010; 1(2):1-16. DOI:10.1300/J285v01n02_01
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    ABSTRACT: This paper addresses a public health issue-infant mortality-of which society has been aware since at least 1900. However, this issue does not receive the public and professional attention given to many other public health issues. The aim of this paper is to review the problem and present a synopsis of initiatives that have been taken to reconsider and revive, from a social work perspective, the person-environment concern, focus, and commitment to reduce infant mortality, especially among Blacks and other racial-ethnic minorities. The proposal calls for the help of inter-related and reinvigorated micro, mezzo, and macro levels of social work intervention in conjunction with the intervention of other professions, government officials, community leaders, and consumers of services.
    Journal of Multicultural Social Work 11/2010; 2(4). DOI:10.1300/J285v02n04_05
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    ABSTRACT: The profession of social work is becoming increasingly both research-based and multicultural in its orientation. In this context, it is crucial for social work researchers to recognize, and grapple with, the conceptual and methodological challenges of conducting quantitative research with subjects from a variety of ethnic backgrounds. This paper accompanies the beginning researcher through the various phases of the research process, providing a systematic overview of the most critical methodological issues to be dealth with at each phase, as well as some possible approaches for dealing with these.
    Journal of Multicultural Social Work 11/2010; 2(4). DOI:10.1300/J285v02n04_02
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    ABSTRACT: Despite the controversy surrounding transracial adoptions, they continue to occur. Social workers in adoptions services must have a keen sense of the theoretical and practice issues that confront them and the consequent mandate to enable prospective non-minority parents to address the racial-cultural identity needs of the minority child they are adopting. An ecological framework elucidates these issues. The paper outlines examples of how adopting parents must comprehend and address the unique needs of their minority child.
    Journal of Multicultural Social Work 11/2010; 1(2):17-32. DOI:10.1300/J285v01n02_02
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    ABSTRACT: It has been twenty years since Robert Hill's seminal research on Black family strengths revolutionized the perceptions, attitudes and modalities related to the coping abilities of Black people. His findings were instrumental in effecting changes in a body of knowledge from one that focused on a monolithic, ethnocentric deficit model to one that affirmed strengths within an historical, culturally diverse conceptual framework. Much of the information available is theoretically based on the Euro-centric worldview resulting in limited use, acceptance and credibility among social work practitioners, social policy analysts and social work academicians. This paper revisits the literature relative to the strengths of Black families. Utilizing recent works of Billingsley (1990), Boyd-Franklin (1989) and others, the strengths of Black families will be re-examined for the purposes of comparing Hill's strength model with the contemporary model of African-American families and its implications for social work education, practice and policy. Additionally, new imperatives are described that possibly will insure African-Americans greater power and control over life situations in the decade of the 90s and into the twenty-first century.
    Journal of Multicultural Social Work 11/2010; 2(4):23-36. DOI:10.1300/J285v02n04_03
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    ABSTRACT: Increasing attention must be given to the psychosocial needs of families with HIV-infected mothers, especially as it relates to permanency planning for children who survive their infected parent(s). Since these families are disproportionately African-American, developing culturally-appropriate services is paramount. Norwood (1988) projected between 52,272 and 72,000 uninfected children will be orphaned in New York City. In Michigan, to understand this problem better, a retrospective chart review utilizing Norwood's model was performed of the families of the 83 infants whose cord blood was positive for maternal HIV antibodies or who were congenitally infected with HIV.
    Journal of Multicultural Social Work 09/2009; 2(3):85-106. DOI:10.1300/J285v02n03_07
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    ABSTRACT: No abstract available for this article.
    Journal of Multicultural Social Work 09/2009; 2(3):1-7. DOI:10.1300/J285v02n03_01
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    ABSTRACT: This paper reports on an "Action Research Study" on youth violence. The study was conducted in the sixth largest city in the U.S. It was carried out with twenty youth between the ages of 13 and 17 years who had been adjudicated for acts of violence ranging from 'assualt with intent to commit great bodily harm,' to out right murder. The data was obtained by extensive indepth personal interview using an instrument designed especially for this study. The data were examined using a SPSSx descriptive statistics package. Results are analyzed and findings discussed. Social Work education implications were discussed.
    Journal of Multicultural Social Work 10/2008; 1(3):33-44. DOI:10.1300/J285v01n03_04
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    ABSTRACT: Much concern has been expressed regarding the potential burden on the states to provide health, education, social and mental health services to refugees, immigrants, and newly legalized aliens. Management of social services for refugees and immigrants is an area which has not received much attention in the social work literature. Within the framework of two components of the current immigration policy, this article will examine funding, staffing, service delivery, and information system needs as critical management issues in the resettlement of refugees and in the delivery of social services to eligible legalized aliens in the United States.
    Journal of Multicultural Social Work 10/2008; 2(1). DOI:10.1300/J285v02n01_03
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    ABSTRACT: This paper addresses issues in the settlement of immigrant and refugee groups and discusses the concept of xenophobia (fear of foreigners) as a key factor in inhibiting integration of the newcomers with the dominant host society. A paradigm is proposed for the analysis and assessment of the type and level of integration achieved by various incoming groups. The model looks at immigrants on two dimensions of integration: economic and cultural, and provides four cells for classification: Assimilation, Accomodation, Adaptation and Alienation. The paper argues that economic variables are a primary influence in facilitating integration and reducing xenophobia.
    Journal of Multicultural Social Work 10/2008; 2(1). DOI:10.1300/J285v02n01_04
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    ABSTRACT: Cambodian, Laotian and Vietnamese refugees who have come to North American host countries via the South Asian camps have been exposed to many potentially traumatic events and have been submitted to an alienating migration process. A comprehensive analysis of their experience both in refugee camps and North American host countries is facilitated by the use of various stress theories. The stressors of change, acculturation, bereavement and trauma are identified with regard to the migration process of the Indochinese refugees as well as to the pre- and post-migration period. Some implications for practice in social, physical and mental health settings are underlined: in particular a sensitivity to the meaning of physical illness within this population, to the cultural reticence towards mental health consultation, to the possibility of longterm vulnerability to post-traumatic stress disorders and to increasing value conflicts within the family. Intervention experiences both in the South Asian refugee camps and in North American host countries suggests the importance of traditional healers and natural support networks.
    Journal of Multicultural Social Work 10/2008; 2(1):15-30. DOI:10.1300/J285v02n01_02
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    ABSTRACT: Within the last decade there has been an increased interest in teaching students about social work values and ethical issues in the classroom, as well as in field placements. Since students learn not only from what they are taught, but also through what they observe, the social work educator becomes an important role model for the student in learning about how social work values are operationalized. Just as traditional social work values of autonomy, self-determination, and confidentiality face many challenges in agency practice, the current cultural diversity of social work students calls for a reexamination of these values, if the social work educator hopes to effectively model ethical behavior. Above all, in the classroom and in academic program planning, social work educators must practice anti-discrimination behavior and gaurd against paternalistic attitudes toward students in order to educate ethically culturally diverse students.
    Journal of Multicultural Social Work 10/2008; 2(2). DOI:10.1300/J285v02n02_02
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    ABSTRACT: This article discusses an integrated, ecological and psychodynamic approach for social workers to incorporate ethnic sensitivity into their pratice. Suggestions are offered for the social work educator to include cultural sensitive theory and practice content in the curriculum.
    Journal of Multicultural Social Work 10/2008; 2(2). DOI:10.1300/J285v02n02_04
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    ABSTRACT: No abstract available for this article.
    Journal of Multicultural Social Work 10/2008; 2(1). DOI:10.1300/J285v02n01_08
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    ABSTRACT: This paper describes a training project for work with Southeast Asian refugees using an integrated family systems approach. The author has found using a model integrating a structural, strategic, life cycle and Milan systemic therapy helpful at three level of project work: consulting with agencies serving the population, training students for this work, and intervening clinically with the refugees themselves.
    Journal of Multicultural Social Work 10/2008; 2(1). DOI:10.1300/J285v02n01_01
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    ABSTRACT: This paper describes the development, format, and procedures of a course designed to prepare social work students to work with immigrants, refugees, and minorities. Historical, sociopolitical, economic, and psychosocial factors are considered. The model emphasizes experiential learning in classroom and community settings, which enables students to integrate theory and skills related to practice. Emphasis is placed on the development of self-awareness as a major aspect of training.
    Journal of Multicultural Social Work 10/2008; 2(1). DOI:10.1300/J285v02n01_06
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    ABSTRACT: About 300 families who adopted a special needs minority or mixed race child responded to a mailed questionnaire. Twenty-two percent of these adoptions were transracial. Transracial adoptees were more often handicapped and had more often experienced sexual abuse, group home or psychiatric placement, and adoption disruption prior to placement. Inracially adopting families evidenced less problematic parent-child relationships but little difference was apparent when multiple regression controlled for the above-mentioned factors. Exploratory analyses reveal interactions of transracial placement with several other factors.
    Journal of Multicultural Social Work 10/2008; 1(3). DOI:10.1300/J285v01n03_03
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    ABSTRACT: No abstract available for this article.
    Journal of Multicultural Social Work 10/2008; 1(1). DOI:10.1300/J285v01n01_02
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    ABSTRACT: U.S. policy towards immigrants since 1798 serves as a clear window through which to view both change and continuity in official resistance to the growth of a multicultural nation. Traditions of nativism, racism, and xenophobia are clearly documented in the history of immigration policy. So also are efforts to supplant these virulent traditions with greater receptivity to demographic diversity. Two centuries of federal policies on immigration, together with case records of social work agencies that served immigrants, constitute excellent texts from which to teach social work students about the historical ambivalence of the people of the United States and their government towards welcoming "others."
    Journal of Multicultural Social Work 10/2008; 2(2). DOI:10.1300/J285v02n02_05
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    ABSTRACT: No abstract available for this article.
    Journal of Multicultural Social Work 10/2008; 1(1):101-104. DOI:10.1300/J285v01n01_08