Journal of Essential Oil Research (J ESSENT OIL RES )

Description

The Journal of Essential Oil Research (JEOR) is the major forum for the publication of essential oil research and analysis. Each issue includes studies performed on the chemical composition of some of the 20,000 aromatic plants known in the plant kingdom. JEOR is devoted entirely to all phases of research from every corner of the world by the experts in their field. JEOR can provide you with the information that you need to complete vital research projects. In a day and age of rapidly changing technology. JEOR can help keep you up to date on the latest discoveries.

  • Impact factor
    0.55
    Show impact factor history
     
    Impact factor
  • 5-year impact
    0.65
  • Cited half-life
    9.20
  • Immediacy index
    0.11
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.14
  • Website
    Journal of Essential Oil Research website
  • Other titles
    Journal of essential oil research (Online), JEOR
  • ISSN
    1041-2905
  • OCLC
    60625407
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The present study was designed to assess differences in chemical composition and antioxidant potential of essential oils and oleoresins from fresh and sun-dried Mentha longifolia L. Essential oils and oleoresins were obtained by hydrodistillation and solvent extraction (n-hexane and ethanol), respectively. The chemical profile was evaluated by using gas chromatography (GC) and GC coupled to mass spectrometry (GC–MS). Antioxidant effectiveness was examined by five different methods, namely the ferric thiocyanate (FTC) method, the 2,2’-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging method, determination of the metal chelating power, and determination of the peroxide and thiobarbituric acid values in mustard oil at 0.02% concentration. The chemical composition was dominated by the presence of piperitenone oxide, an oxygenated monoterpene whose composition varied from 23.2% to 88.5% in both essential oils and oleoresins. Based on the antioxidant potential of essential oils, oleoresins and synthetic antioxidants can be sorted in the following descending order: butylatedhydroxytoluene > dried mint essential oil > fresh mint essential oil > propyl gallate > fresh mint ethanol oleoresin > dried mint ethanol oleoresin > dried mint hexane oleoresin > fresh mint hexane oleoresin. The drying process has a significant influence on the qualitative and quantitative content of the extracted substances.
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 01/2015; 27(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The antimicrobial properties of nine essential oils (EOs) from Souss-Massa, Morocco, were assessed and compared. The studied plants were: Mentha piperita, Mentha pulegium, Mentha spicata, Pelargonium graveolens, Rosmarinus officinalis, Thymus leptobotrys, Thymus pallidus, Thymus satureioides and Citrus limon. EOs were extracted by steam distillation and their minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined versus ten bacteria strains (Enterobacter cloacae, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella Typhimurium, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus equinus and Streptococcus pyogenes), two yeasts (Candida albicans and Candida glabrata) and two fungi (Aspergillus niger and Penicillium funiculosum). Thymus leptobotrys, P. graveolens and T. satureioides showed interesting antimicrobial properties (MIC = [0.7–5.9 μg/mL]). Mentha piperita, T. pallidus and M. spicata gave intermediary results (MIC= [5.7–23.2 μg/mL]) while the remaining EOs displayed poor results (MIC= [23.2–85.5 μg/mL]). EOs that contained primarily, in this order, phenolic terpenes, terpenic alcohols and terpenic aldehydes displayed better antimicrobial properties.
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 01/2015; 27(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The essential oil extracted from twenty-one plants of Pistacia lentiscus L. growing wild in southern Italy (Salento, Apulia), were investigated by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Thirty-eight components, representing more than 75% of the total oil constituents, were identified. The main compounds (with >5% on average) were α-pinene, terpinen-4-ol, δ-cadinene and β-caryophyllene. Four chemotypes were identified: terpinen-4-ol/α-pinene, β-caryophyllene/δ-cadinene/α-pinene, β-myrcene/δ-cadinene and α-pinene. Essential oils showed a radical scavenging activity (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl; DPPH test) ranging between about 21% and 35%.
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 01/2015; 27(1).
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    ABSTRACT: The present study aimed to determine the antimicrobial activity of essential oils extracted from Citrus maxima, Citrus aurantium, Citrus aurantifolia and Limonia acidissima of the Rutaceae and identification of bioactive compounds in oils using thin-layer chromatography (TLC) bioautography and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS) analysis. Antimicrobial screening was done with 10 μL of the oil sample using a disc diffusion method against five Gram-positive and ten Gram-negative bacteria, and a fungal strain, Candida albicans. Among the four oils, C. maxima and C. aurantifolia showed potential antimicrobial properties against the majority of the tested organisms, even when compared with positive controls ciprofloxacin (for bacteria) and ketoconazole (for fungi) antibiotics. In the study, the most sensitive organism to the essential oils was found to be Acinetobacter baumannii and the most resistant organisms were Enterococcus faecalis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Bioautography and GC–MS analysis revealed that E-citral, Z-citral, nerol, geraniol, eucalyptol, linalool, eugenol, methyl cinnamate, terpinen-4-ol, α-terpineol, geranyl acetate and myristic acid were the compounds possessing antimicrobial activity present in the oils.
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 01/2015; 27(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Sunki Mandarin [Citrus sunki (Hayata) hort. ex Tanaka] is a type of micromandarin from South China largely used as a rootstock in Brazil. Cleopatra mandarin (Citrus reshni hort. ex. Tanaka) is a well-formed tree, ornamental, with red-orange fruits. The main objective of this work was to analyze the chemical composition of the essential oil in leaves of accessions of Sunki and Cleopatra mandarins and hybrids. The essential oils were obtained from the leaves by hydrodistillation in a Clevenger-type apparatus and analyzed by gas chromatography/flame ionization detector (GC/FID) and GC/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The oil yields ranged from 1.27% (BCG562 – Hybrid of ‘Sunki’ C12080) to 0.33% (BCG564 – Sunki from Florida) (dry weight basis), and fifty-five constituents were detected. The major constituents were β-pinene (2.5–49.9%), limonene (0–49.0%), sabinene (0.5–35.2%), linalool (0.7–27.3%), thymol methyl ether (0–22.3%), p-cymene (0.2–21.2%), γ-terpinene (0–15.1%), 1.8-cineole (0–11.0%), terpinen-4-ol (0.5–9.4%), (E)-β-ocimene (0.6–6.4%), α-pinene (1.1–4.4%), (E)-nerolidol (1.0–3.2%), α-terpineol (0.4–3.0%) and myrcene (0.7–2.4%).
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 01/2015; 27(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Mints (Mentha species) are being cultivated as an industrial crop for the production of their essential oils in northern Indian plains. In sub-tropical regions, Mentha species are cultivated as a spring–summer crop for their essential oils. However, for planting material production, these species are planted in the rainy season (August). The purpose of this study was to analyze and compare the essential oil quality of rain–winter crops (the planting material-producing crop) with the spring–summer crops (main crops) of Mentha spicata cv. MSS-5, Mentha spicata cv. Ganga, Mentha citrata cv. Kiran, Mentha arvensis cv. CIMAP-Saryu and Mentha x piperita cv. Kukrail. The essential oil yield varied from 0.40% to 1.10% in the main cropping season, whereas it varied from 0.15% to 0.60% in the planting material-producing cropping season. Gas chromatography (GC) and GC–mass spectrometry (GC–MS) analyses resulted in the identification of sixty constituents, representing 93.51–99.71% of the oil compositions. Monoterpenoids (77.33–98.14%) were the prevalent constituents of the essential oils, represented by menthol (38.64–78.21%), carvone (≤0.10–57.78%), piperitenone oxide (67.31–80.60%), linalool (≤0.10–44.16%), iso-dihydrocarveol acetate (1.79–42.26%), linalyl acetate (22.34–48.10%), menthyl acetate (3.79–38.31%), cis-dihydrocarvone (≤0.10–24.37%) and menthone (≤0.10–24.30%) in different mint cultivars. Substantial variations in the oil contents and compositions were noticed between spring–summer crop and rain–winter crop of the investigated mint cultivars.
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 01/2015; 27(1):45-51.
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    ABSTRACT: Volatile compounds isolated from the African medlar (Vangueria infausta L.) were identified by gas chromatography and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. The volatile components identified in the extract were: hexanoic acid (5600 μg/g, dry matter, DM), octanoic acid (240 μg/g, DM), methyl hexanoate (15 μg/g, DM), ethyl hexanoate (44 μg/g, DM), methyl octanoate (12 μg/g, DM) and ethyl octanoate (13 μg/g, DM). The principal aroma from the V. infausta fruit originates from ethyl hexanoate and ethyl octanoate with a minor contribution from methyl hexanoate and methyl octanoate.
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 01/2015; 27(1).
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    ABSTRACT: The antimicrobial activity of essential oils (EOs) from spices and medicinal plants or their constituents has gained increasing interest. However, studies on their use in combination with other antimicrobials or technologies are still scarce. In this paper, the survival of Salmonella enteritidis exposed to a combined effect of four EOs (from Xylopia aethiopica, Curcuma longa, Zanthoxylum leprieurii and Zanthoxylum xanthoxyloides) and mild heat treatments (55° and 60°C) were assessed. Salmonella enteritidis demonstrated a biphasic inactivation curve at 55°C in the absence of EOs, while in the presence of EOs the Weibull model was used. The combination of temperature and EOs reduced the treatment time needed to inactivate 7 log cfu/mL of S. enteritidis: this reduction ranged, with respect to the control, from 92.6% to 96.4% when the treatment was performed at 55°C, and from 20.5% to 27. 5% at 60°C. The efficiency of the interaction of the combination of EOs and mild thermal treatment is related to increased vapor pressure of EO constituents, which became more soluble in the membrane of stressed cells.
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 01/2015; 27(1).
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    ABSTRACT: Ocimum sp. taxonomy and nomenclature are in a state of confusion; thus species and cultivar identification are hampered by the large number of species belonging to this genus. In this study, we examined DNA barcoding and leaf essential oil (EO) composition methods for cultivar identification of local and recently introduced Ocimum sp. Both barcodes of rbcLa and matK were sequenced for each species in parallel with leaf EO composition analyses using gas chromatography and GC–mass spectrometry (GC–MS) of five Ocimum basilicum cultivars. Antioxidant activities for the EO were determined using 2,2′-diphenypicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and β-carotene-linoleic acid assays. The main EO constituents were methyl cinnamate (43.8%) in O. basilicum L., chavicol methyl ether (39.1% and 32.3%) in O. basilicum purple ruffle and anise; respectively, and linalool (30.9% and 30.6%) in O. basilicum Genovese and bush green, respectively. All cultivars were classified into chemotypes easily using their EOs when compared with barcoding using core barcodes, which exhibited no variation among all species in both markers except for Ocimum americanum, varying in a single base pair in matK. We concluded that chemotyping performed better than barcoding in species and cultivar identification, and the search for a better barcodes should continue.
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Essential oils were extracted from the roots and leaves of Cnidium officinale Makino (Umbelliferae) cultivated in three different districts of Korea. Extraction was carried out by steam distillation, and the composition of the essential oils was analyzed by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS). The extracted oils were compared between different samples. The antibacterial properties of the essential oils and their main components were determined against twelve antibiotic-susceptible or -resistant food-borne pathogenic bacteria. No distinct differences in composition of the essential oils from the rhizomes were found depending upon from which of the three districts the plant was cultivated. In contrast, their composition differed markedly depending on from which part of the plant the oil came, specifically the leaves versus the rhizomes. All of the essential oil fractions and their main component, Z-ligustilide, inhibited the growth of all of the bacterial strains tested, except for Yersinia enterocolitica, and had minimum inhibiting concentrations (MICs) ranging from 0.5 to 4.0 mg/mL. In addition, the cell viability of Caco-2 and MKN-45 cancer cell lines was not altered following exposure to the oils at concentrations between 10 and 160 μg/mL.
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 11/2014; 26(6).
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    ABSTRACT: In this study, the essential oil of Citrus aurantifolia (Christm.) Swingle was extracted by hydrodistillation and, after chemical characterization, was evaluated for its antimicrobial activity on a representative range of ATCC and clinical strains. The chemical composition of the volatile fraction of key lime oil was determined using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS) and GC–flame ionization detection (GC–FID). The antimicrobial activity of the oil was evaluated on a representative range of Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria and yeasts, including ATCC and clinical strains, by the disc diffusion method and the broth microdilution method. The major components of lime essential oil proved to be β-pinene (12.6%), limonene (53.8%), γ-terpinene (16.5%), terpinolene (0.6%), α-terpineol (0.4%) and citral (2.5%), which are very likely responsible for the good antimicrobial activity, in particular on Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus epidermidis).
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 11/2014; 26(6).
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    ABSTRACT: Flowering shoot biomass of Artemisia annua var. Jeevanraksha grown under the semi-arid tropical climate of Hyderabad, South India, and distilled by field- and hydro-distillation techniques produced 0.26% and 0.35% essential oil yields on a fresh weight basis, respectively. Gas chromatography–flame ionization detector (GC–FID) and GC/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analyses yielded fifty-four constituents accounting for 95.8% and 92.0% of the oils in field and hydro-distillations, respectively. The major compounds of the field-distilled oil were: camphor (23.6%), β-caryophyllene (16.6%), α-humulene (5.4%) and germacrene D (17.0%). The principal components of the hydro-distilled oil were: 1,8-cineole (11.1%), camphor (36.6%), β-caryophyllene (5.7%) and germacrene D (5.9%). Aliphatic ketones (37.7%), monoterpene hydrocarbons (11.2%) and oxygenated monoterpenes (19.9%) were higher in the hydro-distilled oil. Sesquiterpene hydrocarbons (54.1%) and oxygenated sesquiterpenes (6.8%) were present in large amounts in the field-distilled oil.
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 11/2014; 26(6).
  • Journal of Essential Oil Research 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Access pdf in http://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/7EP3XwJz8H9dEehGmWqq/full#.VC7or2ddWnI The essential oil from the aerial parts of two cultivated subspecies from Porophyllum ruderale, Porophyllum ruderale subsp. macrocephalum (PRM) and Porophyllum ruderale subsp. ruderale (PRR) were obtained by hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and GC–mass spectrometry (GC–MS). Monoterpenes were the most abundant components. The oil from PRM presented limonene (83.5%), myrcene (6.3%) and 1-undecene (5.4%) as the major compounds, while the oil from PRR contained E-β-ocimene (54.9%), limonene (25.2%) and β-pinene (10.1%) as the main components. These results suggest that the main component of the essential oil can differentiate the two P. ruderale subspecies.
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 10/2014; 27.
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    ABSTRACT: The volatile compounds present in the volatile oils and aroma from fresh flowers of Bidens segetum Martius ex Colla were characterized. The samples were collected from naturally occurring populations of the Brazilian Cerrado and from plants cultivated at the Instituto de Botânica de São Paulo (Atlantic rainforest) from its seeds. The essential oils were obtained by hydrodistillation in a Clevenger apparatus, while the aroma was extracted by headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) and both were analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and GC–mass spectrometry (GC–MS). β-Phellandrene (18–45%) and germacrene D (6–32%) were always present in the oils and aroma; however, their percentages varied. Besides these, E-β-ocimene (11.6%), myrcene (11.2%), α-pinene (7.3%), sabinene (6.7%), bicyclogermacrene (5.7%) and δ-cadinene (3.2%) appeared as major constituents of the volatile components from B. segetum flowers.
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 09/2014;