Journal of Essential Oil Research (J ESSENT OIL RES )

Description

The Journal of Essential Oil Research (JEOR) is the major forum for the publication of essential oil research and analysis. Each issue includes studies performed on the chemical composition of some of the 20,000 aromatic plants known in the plant kingdom. JEOR is devoted entirely to all phases of research from every corner of the world by the experts in their field. JEOR can provide you with the information that you need to complete vital research projects. In a day and age of rapidly changing technology. JEOR can help keep you up to date on the latest discoveries.

  • Impact factor
    0.55
    Show impact factor history
     
    Impact factor
  • 5-year impact
    0.65
  • Cited half-life
    9.20
  • Immediacy index
    0.11
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.14
  • Website
    Journal of Essential Oil Research website
  • Other titles
    Journal of essential oil research (Online), JEOR
  • ISSN
    1041-2905
  • OCLC
    60625407
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Leaves from sixty trees in five populations of Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehnh. and one population of Eucalyptus melliodora A.Cunn. ex Schauer growing in Fars Province in the south of Iran were analyzed for quantitative and qualitative variation in essential leaf oils. Using the sequence variation of the external transcribed sequence of ribosomal DNA (ETS rDNA) region, the phylogenetic relationships among the populations were also studied. The results obtained were interpreted using statistical analysis, considering the nineteen abundantly found compounds. The main ones were 1,8-cineole followed by globulol, limonene, α-pinene, viridiflorol and p-cymene. As the distribution of terpenoid variables was not normal within the populations, data analysis by a non-parametric Kruskal–Wallis test showed significant changes in the essential oil components among the studied populations. Principal components analysis based on the relative amounts of the essential oil components indicated four chemotypes. Nucleotide sequencing of the ETS rDNA gave fragments of 504 base pairs and generated distinct patterns among the populations. Using the Neighbor-Joining procedure with bootstrapping support based on a pairwise distance matrix led to a phylogenetic tree with four clades. However, good agreement exists between the molecular and phytochemical outcomes found in the phylogenetic relationship of some populations.
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 07/2014; corrected proof in press.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Jasmonic acid (JA) and its volatile methyl ester (MJ) are regarded as endogenous regulators that play important roles in regulating stress responses, plant growth and development. Salicylic acid (SA) has been identified as an important signaling element involved in establishing the local and systemic disease resistance response of plants after pathogen attack. Growth, oil yield and chemical components of Satureja hortensis L. grown in greenhouse conditions were investigated. Experimental treatments, included (i) water foliar application, (ii) water + ethanol foliar application, (iii–v) 50, 100, and 200 μL JA and (vi–ix) 50, 100, and 200 M SA. The hydro-distilled oil yields of studied treatments ranged between 0.74 and 0.91 mL/100 g dry matter. The major components of the oil were carvacrol, γ-terpinene, (Z)-β-ocimene, α-pinene, and α-terpinene. The result indicated that different levels of JA and SA had significant impacts on chemical components of S. hortensis oils, whereas they had no significant effects on oil yield and dry herbage. Foliar application of 50 μL SA increased monoterpene hydrocarbons in S. hortensis oil, whereas oxygenated monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes decreased. Finally, some of secondary metabolites in S. hortensis could be partially changed by supplementation of different elicitors.
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 06/2014;
  • Journal of Essential Oil Research 06/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A study was carried out over two years (2009 and 2010) at the CSIR- Institute of Himalayan Bioresource Technology, Palampur, India, to investigate the effect of irradiance stress and plant spacing on growth, biomass yield, essential oil content and composition in wild marigold (Tagetes minuta L.). Four shade levels (0, 25, 50 and 75%) and three plant spacing (45 x 30 cm, 45 x 45 cm and 60 x 45 cm) were tested as per split plot design. Heavy shading (50 and 75%) strongly reduced total essential oil content in fresh leaves and flowers. Essential oil content of leaf, flower and total oil increased upto 25% shade level and declined thereafter with decrease in irradiance level. Ocimene and dihydrotagetones concentration in leaf oil decreased with decrease in irradiance level, however, tagetone and ocimenone showed the reverse trend. In flower oil, ocimene decreased with increase in shade levels. Fresh leaf, stem, flower, leaf + flower biomass, total biomass was significantly higher in 45 x 30 cm spacing level. Essential oil content in flowers of T. minuta grown in 25% shade at 45 x 45 cm and 45 x 30 cm spacing recorded significantly higher essential oil content than other treatments.
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 06/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This research aimed to produce personal care biomaterials with an antimicrobial and flavoring effect that allowed the controlled release of biologically active constituents. We investigated the manufacturing conditions of oil-in-water-type chitosan emulsions encapsulating geranium essential oil and the influence on controlled release and antimicrobial effect of the biologically active compounds. The materials were obtained by applying the polymeric matrix/biologically active compound system on a 100% cotton textile substrate. Seven treatment variants that differ one from another by the concentrations of the two components of the system (the polymer and the biologically active compound) were used. The release profile of the biologically active compound from the treated textile substrate was analyzed according to the Peppas kinetic models. The results suggest that the forming of emulsions should be processed under the following conditions: a concentration of chitosan of 0.250% (w/v), geranium essential oil 0.450% (w/v), Tween 80 1% (w/v) and glycerine 2% (w/v), so that we could obtain biomaterials with the best controlled release of biologically active compounds.
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 05/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The hydrodistilled leaf essential oil of Inula cuspidata (Wall. ex DC) C.B. Clarke was investigated using capillary gas chromatography–flame ionization detector (GC–FID) and GC–mass spectrometry (GC–MS). A total of fifty-two constituents, representing 83.4% of the total oil composition were identified. The oil was mainly dominated by sesquiterpenoids (78.1%) with small amounts of monoterpenoids (3.0%) and benzenoid components (2.7%). The major constituents of the essential oil were presilphiperfolan-8-ol (17.4%), ar-curcumene (17.0%), (E)-β-farnesene (8.2%), isoledene (6.7%), presilphiperfol-7-ene (5.5%), (E)-caryophyllene (4.1%), silphiperfol-6-ene (3.8%), silphinene (3.0%), cameroonal-7-α-ol (2.6%), α-pinene (1.8%) and silphiperfol-5-ene (1.5%). Characteristic of the I. cuspidata leaf oil was the presence of rare tricyclic sesquiterpenoids in larger amounts. To the best of our knowledge, at least forty-five constituents were identified for the first time in I. cuspidata leaf essential oil.
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 02/2014; 26(4):233-237.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Interest in medicinal and aromatic plants as a source of antimicrobial drugs has emerged, mainly due to increased resistance of infectious agents. In this study, the antifungal and cytotoxic activity of thirteen essential oils and nine extracts of plants of the genus Piper, from Colombia, were evaluated. The Piper hispidum Sw oil showed activity against the multi-resistant fungus Fusarium oxysporum. Six samples showed strong activity against dermatophytes, being Piper bogotense the most active, followed by P. hispidum. The oils from Piper hispidum, Piper coruscans, Piper marginatum and Piper cf. divaricatum, and the extract from Piper sanctifelicis, were not cytotoxic, unlike Piper bredemeyeri, Piper eriopodon and Piper bogotense oils, which exhibited significant cytotoxicity. The main components of the most active samples showed the presence of trans-β-caryophyllene. In addition, caryophyllene oxide, β-pinene and α-pinene were present in most antifungal oils at different concentrations. These results confirm the anti-mycotic potential of essential oils of the Piper genus against the most pathogenic fungi, as well as against important dermatological fungi.
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 02/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The phytochemical analysis of the essential oil obtained by hydrodistillation from the leaves of Hibiscus surattensis L. (Malvaceae) is being reported. The oil, analyzed by gas chromatography–flame ionization detector (GC–FID) and GC–mass spectrometry (GC–MS), was dominated by monoterpenes (34.1%) and sesquiterpene compounds (41.2%). The major oil constituents were β-caryophyllene (12.9%), menthol (10.6%), methyl salicylate (9.7%) and camphor (9.2%). There were significant amounts of germacrene D (5.5%), hexadecanoic acid (4.3%), α-humulene (4.0%), 1, 8-cineole (3.0%) and menthone (3.0%). This is the first report on the volatile compounds of H. surattensis
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 01/2014; 26(2):114-117.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We studied the suspected fragrance allergens citral, geraniol, cinnamyl alcohol, α-amyl cinnamaldehyde and 4-allylbenzenes (eugenol, methyl eugenol, acetyl eugenol, estragole, safrole and myristicin), as well as 4-propenylbenzenes (isoeugenol, α-asarone and trans-anethole) using two complementary, fast and non-destructive methods: attenuated total reflectance–infrared (ATR–IR) and Raman spectroscopy. We investigated a hierarchical cluster analysis based on the ATR–IR data. The gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS) data of nutmeg, ylang, sandalwood, basil, ginger, thyme and fennel essential oils correlates very well with the results of Ward’s algorithm. We also used ATR–IR spectroscopy as a rapid method for quantitative analysis of suspected fragrance allergens in commercial essential oils. The method was based on ATR–IR utilizing partial least squares regression. The calibrations were modeled in the characteristic region (citral 1193–1194 cm−1, geraniol 1375–1378 cm−1, cinnamyl alcohol 732–734 cm−1, α-amyl cinnamaldehyde 1623–1624 cm−1, estragole 1583–1584 cm−1, eugenol 792–795 cm−1, methyl eugenol 804–807 cm−1, acetyl eugenol 1603–1604 cm−1, isoeugenol 959–963 cm−1, trans-anethole 1282–1283 cm−1, α-asarone 1401–1402 cm−1, safrole 1441–1443 cm−1) for suspected fragrance allergens.
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 01/2014; 26(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study investigated the seasonal variation (October 2009 to September 2010) in the chemical composition of the leaf essential oil of Ruta graveolens L. and evaluated its activity against third-instar larvae of Aedes aegypti and juvenile nematodes (J2) of Meloidogyne incognita. The essential oil was obtained by hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography/flame ionization detection (GC/FID) and GC/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Nine compounds were identified in the oil samples obtained during a year. The major components were 2-undecanone (37.0±2.0% to 58.2±5.1%) and 2-nonanone (17.6±1.3% to 53.1±3.9%). The essential oil showed lc50 and lc90 values of 39.55 and 64.17 ppm for A. aegypti respectively, and 267.20 and 482.03 ppm for M. incognita, respectively.
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 01/2014; 26(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The alarming resistance of many bacterial pathogens to most available antibiotics has increased interest in natural plant products as alternative antibacterial agents. In this research, the antibacterial activity of Teucrium polium essential oil was determined against urinary isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae. The aerial parts of T. polium were collected at full flowering stage in Tehran, Iran. The essential oil was isolated by hydrodistillation and analyzed by a combination of capillary gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography–mass spectometry (GC–MS) Antibacterial activity was measured against fifteen clinical isolates of K. pneumoniae by disc diffusion. Minimum inhibitory and bactericidal concentrations were also determined using broth microdilution. Twenty constituents were detected in T. polium essential oil of which the major components were β-caryophyllene (29%), farnesene (13%), β-pinene (11%) followed by germacrene D (6.5%) and α-pinene (5.5%). All K. pneumoniae clinical test isolates were susceptible to the essential oil by disc diffusion with inhibition zones within the range of 14–28.5 mm. Minimum inhibitory and bactericidal concentration values were 0.62–1.25 mg/ml and confirmed the disc test results. T. polium essential oil may have a potential for use against multidrug resistant organisms such as clinical isolates of K. pneumoniae.
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 01/2014; 26(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The invasive plant Leonurus sibiricus L. is known for the production of terpenoids and phenolic substances that exert allelopathic effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of different concentrations of an L. sibiricus extract on the chemical composition of Mentha × piperita L. essential oils cultivated in a nutrient solution. The methanolic extract from L. sibiricus was tested at three different concentrations, 25, 50 or 100 mg/L, in hydroponically grown M. × piperita. The chemical compositions of the essential oils from the M. × piperita plant were evaluated at different times. The results showed that at all concentrations levels, menthol was the major component of the essential oil, comprising 35.2% (average percentage) of the oil components. Menthol and menthyl acetate showed some interesting divergent patterns; the presence of menthol was higher in the plants cultivated with 25 mg/L of the methanolic extract of L. sibiricus leaves, and the presence of menthyl acetate correlated with cultivation of the plants in 50 and 100 mg/L of the extract. The concentration of the methanolic extract of L. sibiricus leaves that was applied to the M. × piperita plants influenced the levels of the components in the essential oil.
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 01/2014; 26(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In this study, the efficacy of thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.), sage (Salvia officinalis L.), rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) and bay (Laurus nobilis) essential oils in stabilizing canola oil and its purified triacylglycerols (TAGs) during accelerated storage was investigated. β-carotene bleaching test, 2,2′-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging test and conjugated diene tests indicated the antioxidant activity of thyme to be comparable with that of synthetic antioxidants. In oven test, thyme was most effective in decreasing the conjugated diene (CD) content, peroxide value (PV) and the p-anisidine value (AV) of canola oil, being followed by rosemary and sage. The lowest specific extinction (K 232 and K 270) values during oxidation of essential oils supplemented TAGs were also obtained for thyme. The induction periods of canola oil increased slightly with essential oils. Protection factors were in the range of 1.10–1.19 at 110°C, while the protection factors were high (1.01–4.08) in triacylglycerols at 80°C. Based on the results, thyme was found to be suitable for the stabilization of vegetable oils.
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 01/2014; 26(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Air-, oven- and freeze-dried garlic bulbs were hydrodistilled and the resulting essential oils were analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and GC/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The highest yields were 0.6 and 0.5% (w/w) for freeze- and oven-dried samples, respectively. The essential oils were characterized by a high amount of sulfur compounds (84.3–98.9%) with diallyl trisulfide (37.3–45.9%), diallyl disulfide (17.5–35.6%) and methyl allyl trisulfide (7.7–10.4%) being the major components. Remarkable qualitative and quantitative differences between the investigated oils owing to the drying procedure were found and a set of marker components was established to differentiate between them.
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 01/2014; 26(2).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The cytotoxic activities of Lindera strychnifolia essential oil on nine human cell lines and the induction of apoptosis in HepG2 cells were determined. Cytotoxicities of leaf oil were examined on the human carcinoma cell lines (Eca-109, HepG2, HT29, MDA-MB-231, PC-3, SGC7901, SW1990 and U2-OS) and a normal cell line (HL-7702) using the MTT assay. Apoptotic effects of leaf oil on HepG2 cells were investigated using Hoechst 33258 staining, agarose gel electrophoresis and flow cytometry. Also, cytotoxicities of four compounds from the essential oil were studied. Our results showed that leaf essential oil exhibited significant cytotoxicity against all the cells tested with a potential selectivity for cancerous cells. The lowest IC50 of 22.68±1.19 μg/mL was measured for HepG2. The anticancer mechanism of leaf essential oil on HepG2 cells involved induction of apoptosis. Also, geraniol and bornyl acetate exhibited some cytotoxicity. The data suggest that leaf essential oil of L. strychnifolia could be a potential medicinal resource in cancer therapy.
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 01/2014; 26(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Chemical composition of the Thymus daenensis essential oil and its toxicity was investigated against the first and third instar larvae and adults of Ephestia kuehniella and Plodia interpunctella. Chemical composition of the volatile oil was studied by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS). Carvacrol (37.0%), thymol (12.8%), β-caryophyllene (7.6%), and geraniol (5.74) were found to be the major constituents of the oil. In fumigant toxicity, the adult stage of E. kuehniella and P. interpunctella (lc50 values of 0.191 and 0.27 μL/L, respectively) were more sensitive to T. daenensis essential oil than first and third instar larvae. In both pests, sensitivity of larvae decreased from first to third instar larvae. However, the first instar larvae of E. kuehniella (lc50=16.30 μL/L) was more sensitive to T. daenensis essential oil than P. interpunctella (lc50=25.32 μL/L) but sensitivity of the third instar larvae of E. kuehniella (lc50=44830 μL/L) was less than P. interpunctella (lc50=3480 μL/L). Repellency of the essential oil in both species was proportional to essential oil concentration. Adults of E. kuehniella with an rc50 value of 0.69 μL/L were more sensitive to repellent effect of the essential oil than adults of P. interpunctella with rc50 value of 6.88 μL/L.
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 01/2014; 26(2).

Related Journals