Journal of Essential Oil Research (J ESSENT OIL RES )

Description

The Journal of Essential Oil Research (JEOR) is the major forum for the publication of essential oil research and analysis. Each issue includes studies performed on the chemical composition of some of the 20,000 aromatic plants known in the plant kingdom. JEOR is devoted entirely to all phases of research from every corner of the world by the experts in their field. JEOR can provide you with the information that you need to complete vital research projects. In a day and age of rapidly changing technology. JEOR can help keep you up to date on the latest discoveries.

  • Impact factor
    0.55
    Show impact factor history
     
    Impact factor
  • 5-year impact
    0.65
  • Cited half-life
    9.20
  • Immediacy index
    0.11
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.14
  • Website
    Journal of Essential Oil Research website
  • Other titles
    Journal of essential oil research (Online), JEOR
  • ISSN
    1041-2905
  • OCLC
    60625407
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to determine the chemical variation in indigenous populations of bitter fennel originating from Iran. Essential oils isolated from the fruits of eight different populations of Foeniculum vulgare var. vulgare from different locations of Iran were analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and GC/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). According to the results, the essential oil content in the fruit varied from 2.7% to 4%. The major chemical constituents exhibited higher differences between the populations. trans-Anethole was found to be the main component of the oil with rates of 46.5% and 84% in fruits and this component was followed by fenchone (9.1–23.8%), which is the second major phenylpropanoid detected in fennel oil. Limonene, estragol (methyl chavicol), γ-terpinene, α-pinene and β-mercene are other main components identified in the fennel oils. trans-Anethole was detected at the highest level (84%) in ‘Zanjan’ population oil and the ‘Marvdasht’ population contained the highest concentration (12.2%) of estragol compared with other populations. Fenchone, limonene, γ-terpinene, α-pinene and β-mercene were in higher concentrations in ‘Ardabil’ population oil than the other populations, while trans-anethole was the lowest in this population’s oil. The results suggest that there were important variations among the fennel population’s fruit in Iran concerning the essential oil content and composition.
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Essential oils of Kadsura oblongifolia Merr. (Schisandraceae) were analyzed by capillary gas chromatography (GC) and GC coupled with mass spectrometry (GC–MS). Sixty, sixty-four and twenty-four compounds representing 99.4%, 90.5% and 99.8% of the total oil contents were identified, respectively, from the leaf, stem and root oil. Leaf oil contained cis-cadina-1,4-diene (22.6%), α-pinene (6.7%), α-amorphene (5.6%), cadina-4,10(15)-dien-3-one (5.2%) and δ-cadinene (5.2%), while the stem bark contained α-coapene (20.3%), α-pinene (9.3%) and 1,8-cineole (7.3%). The main constituents of the root were β-caryophyllene (24.9%), α-humulene (12.1%), β-selinene (8.5%) and α-amorphene (8.0%).
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 09/2014; 26(5).
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    ABSTRACT: The essential oil content in the aerial parts of the endemic species Pycnocycla bashagardiana growing wild in the south of Iran was found to be 1.1% based on the fresh weight. The oil was analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and GC–mass spectrometry (GC–MS). Forty-six constituents, representing 98.1% of the oil, were identified. The major components of the oil were myristicin (18.6%), cis-isomyristicin (15.3%), E-β-ocimene (11.6%), Z-β-ocimene (6.5%), sabinene (4.8%) and intermedeol (4.0%).
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 09/2014; 26(5).
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    ABSTRACT: Baccharis dracunculifolia is a shrub native to Brazil and an important botanical source for propolis production. The essential oil from the leaves of B. dracunculifolia DC (Asteraceae), popularly known as broom oil, presents pharmacological activities and is a raw material in the perfumery and cosmetics industries. The isolation of its major constituent, nerolidol, to a high purity (92.5–93.7%) was possible through the countercurrent chromatography technique. The countercurrent chromatography biphasic solvent system chosen was a mixture of hexane:methanol:water (5:4:1, v/v/v). Isocratic elution was conducted in a tail-to-head manner.
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 09/2014; 26(5).
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    ABSTRACT: The compositional variability of Lithuanian field wormwood (Artemisia campestris ssp. campestris) essential oils was presented for the first time. The oils (twenty-five samples) were obtained by hydro-distillation and analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and GC–mass spectrometry (GC–MS). Statistical data analysis grouped the samples into three segments. The main chemical profile (twenty-one samples) was characterized by the predominance of germacrene D (9.8–31.2%), while spathulenol, humulene epoxide II and caryophyllene oxide were found as the first major compounds in another three oils. One oil was determined as a mixed chemotype. Some compounds such as γ-curcumene, α-cadinol, (E,E)-α-farnesene, β-ylangene, β-selinene and humulene epoxide II have been mentioned for the first time among three principal constituents in A. campestris oils. The fifty-six components (in amounts ≥0.5%) made up 73.6.1–98.5% of the total content, while the remaining twenty-six volatile compounds were identified in insignificant amounts in the A. campestris essential oils.
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 09/2014; 26(5).
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    ABSTRACT: In this study, the cytological and biochemical effects of zingiberene (ZBN) on human lymphocytes cultures were investigated. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays were used for viability and cytotoxic evaluations. Micronucleus (MN) and chromosomal aberration (CA) tests were used for genetic evaluations. Moreover, total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and total oxidative status (TOS) analyses were used for biochemical evaluations. Utilizing the MTT and LDH assays, the cytotoxicity of ZBN was determined on lymphocyte cultures and the short-term lymphocyte cultures were incubated with various doses of the ZBN; the results demonstrated that the growth of lymphocytes cells was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, MNs and CAs in lymphocytes were not influenced by exposure to ZBN. Moreover, ZBN treatment caused increases in TAC levels in human lymphocytes without changing TOS levels. In conclusion, ZBN could be used as a suggested natural antioxidant for therapeutic, pharmaceutical and food applications.
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 09/2014; 26(5).
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    ABSTRACT: The essential oil from leaves of Nectandra antillana Meisn. grown in Cuba was isolated by hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography/flame ionization detector (GC/FID) and GC/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). One hundred and fifty compounds were identified and quantified, accounting for 99% of the total composition. The essential oil was rich in sesquiterpene compounds, particularly caryophyllene oxide (16.0%), β-caryophyllene (9.9%) and guaiol (8.7%). The in vitro antibacterial activity of the essential oil was studied against five bacteria strains (Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Listeria monocytogenes) using the disc diffusion method. The essential oil was slightly effective against nearly all bacteria tested, except for B. subtilis.
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 09/2014; 26(5).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The essential oil contents and compositions of the leaves and inflorescences of Ocimum basilicum L. (four chemotypes), Ocimum kilimandscharicum Guerke (two chemotypes), Ocimum americanum L. and Ocimum grattisimum L. were analyzed and compared using gas chromatography (GC) and GC–mass spectrometry (GC–MS). Essential oil content on a fresh weight basis varied from 0.60% to 1.00% in leaves and from 0.28% to 0.85% in inflorescences of different Ocimum species/chemotypes. A total of eighty-six components, constituting 96.4–99.2% of the leaf oil and 88.0–99.3% of inflorescence oil, were identified. Phenylpropanoids (methyl chavicol and eugenol) and monoterpenoids (citral, camphor, linalool, 1,8-cineole, limonene and (Z)-β-ocimene) were among the major constituents identified in their essential oils. Chromatographic results and subsequent hierarchical cluster analysis showed that the distribution of components, both qualitatively and quantitatively, varied considerably in leaf and inflorescence essential oils of the studied Ocimum species and their chemotypes.
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Essential oils from five wild species growing in Lebanon and used in traditional medicine were obtained by hydrodistillation. Their chemical composition was determined by gas chromatography (GC) and GC–mass spectrometry (GC–MS), and the major constituents were α-pinene in Juniperus excelsa M. Bieb. (68.8–86.8%, according to different organs), carvacrol in Thymbra spicata L. (65.8%) and Coridothymus capitatus (L.) Rchb. f. (47%), pulegone in Mentha spicata L. subsp. condensata (Briq.) Greuter & Burdet (32.8%) and 1,8-cineole in Salvia fruticosa (Mill.) K. Schum. (48.7%). Antiradical capacity of the essential oils was measured in vitro by the 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS⋅+) radical cation and 2,2-diphenyl-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH⋅) radical assays. A good agreement between the two tests was recorded: C. capitatus and T. spicata oils showed the highest ABTS⋅+ and DPPH⋅ radical-scavenging activity, possibly due to their high levels of carvacrol, whereas the lowest antiradical capacity was reported for J. excelsa oils.
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Jasmonic acid (JA) and its volatile methyl ester (MJ) are regarded as endogenous regulators that play important roles in regulating stress responses, plant growth and development. Salicylic acid (SA) has been identified as an important signaling element involved in establishing the local and systemic disease resistance response of plants after pathogen attack. Growth, oil yield and chemical components of Satureja hortensis L. grown in greenhouse conditions were investigated. Experimental treatments, included (i) water foliar application, (ii) water + ethanol foliar application, (iii–v) 50, 100, and 200 μL JA and (vi–ix) 50, 100, and 200 M SA. The hydro-distilled oil yields of studied treatments ranged between 0.74 and 0.91 mL/100 g dry matter. The major components of the oil were carvacrol, γ-terpinene, (Z)-β-ocimene, α-pinene, and α-terpinene. The result indicated that different levels of JA and SA had significant impacts on chemical components of S. hortensis oils, whereas they had no significant effects on oil yield and dry herbage. Foliar application of 50 μL SA increased monoterpene hydrocarbons in S. hortensis oil, whereas oxygenated monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes decreased. Finally, some of secondary metabolites in S. hortensis could be partially changed by supplementation of different elicitors.
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Limnophila rugosa (Roth.) Merr. is an important Indian traditional medicinal plant, used for the treatment of various diseases. Fragrant volatile oils isolated from the aerial parts of L. rugosa collected from two diverse localities in northern India (foothills and mid-hills) were investigated by gas chromatography (GC) and GC–mass spectrometry (GC–MS). The essential oil yields and chemical compositions of L. rugosa from the two localities differed significantly. The population collected from the mid-hills was rich in essential oil (0.44%) compared with the population from the foothills (0.25%). The essential oil of the foothill population was characterized by the dominance of methyl chavicol (76.6%), followed by (E)-anethole (19.1%). Conversely, the essential oil of the mid-hill population was dominated exclusively by (E)-anethole (88.5%). These genetic resources of L. rugosa can be utilized as a valuable source of the high-value aromachemicals, namely methyl chavicol and (E)-anethole.
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: A study was carried out over two years (2009 and 2010) at the CSIR- Institute of Himalayan Bioresource Technology, Palampur, India, to investigate the effect of irradiance stress and plant spacing on growth, biomass yield, essential oil content and composition in wild marigold (Tagetes minuta L.). Four shade levels (0, 25, 50 and 75%) and three plant spacing (45 x 30 cm, 45 x 45 cm and 60 x 45 cm) were tested as per split plot design. Heavy shading (50 and 75%) strongly reduced total essential oil content in fresh leaves and flowers. Essential oil content of leaf, flower and total oil increased upto 25% shade level and declined thereafter with decrease in irradiance level. Ocimene and dihydrotagetones concentration in leaf oil decreased with decrease in irradiance level, however, tagetone and ocimenone showed the reverse trend. In flower oil, ocimene decreased with increase in shade levels. Fresh leaf, stem, flower, leaf + flower biomass, total biomass was significantly higher in 45 x 30 cm spacing level. Essential oil content in flowers of T. minuta grown in 25% shade at 45 x 45 cm and 45 x 30 cm spacing recorded significantly higher essential oil content than other treatments.
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: This research aimed to produce personal care biomaterials with an antimicrobial and flavoring effect that allowed the controlled release of biologically active constituents. We investigated the manufacturing conditions of oil-in-water-type chitosan emulsions encapsulating geranium essential oil and the influence on controlled release and antimicrobial effect of the biologically active compounds. The materials were obtained by applying the polymeric matrix/biologically active compound system on a 100% cotton textile substrate. Seven treatment variants that differ one from another by the concentrations of the two components of the system (the polymer and the biologically active compound) were used. The release profile of the biologically active compound from the treated textile substrate was analyzed according to the Peppas kinetic models. The results suggest that the forming of emulsions should be processed under the following conditions: a concentration of chitosan of 0.250% (w/v), geranium essential oil 0.450% (w/v), Tween 80 1% (w/v) and glycerine 2% (w/v), so that we could obtain biomaterials with the best controlled release of biologically active compounds.
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The hydrodistilled leaf essential oil of Inula cuspidata (Wall. ex DC) C.B. Clarke was investigated using capillary gas chromatography–flame ionization detector (GC–FID) and GC–mass spectrometry (GC–MS). A total of fifty-two constituents, representing 83.4% of the total oil composition were identified. The oil was mainly dominated by sesquiterpenoids (78.1%) with small amounts of monoterpenoids (3.0%) and benzenoid components (2.7%). The major constituents of the essential oil were presilphiperfolan-8-ol (17.4%), ar-curcumene (17.0%), (E)-β-farnesene (8.2%), isoledene (6.7%), presilphiperfol-7-ene (5.5%), (E)-caryophyllene (4.1%), silphiperfol-6-ene (3.8%), silphinene (3.0%), cameroonal-7-α-ol (2.6%), α-pinene (1.8%) and silphiperfol-5-ene (1.5%). Characteristic of the I. cuspidata leaf oil was the presence of rare tricyclic sesquiterpenoids in larger amounts. To the best of our knowledge, at least forty-five constituents were identified for the first time in I. cuspidata leaf essential oil.
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 02/2014; 26(4):233-237.

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