Journal of Essential Oil Research Impact Factor & Information

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Journal description

The Journal of Essential Oil Research (JEOR) is the major forum for the publication of essential oil research and analysis. Each issue includes studies performed on the chemical composition of some of the 20,000 aromatic plants known in the plant kingdom. JEOR is devoted entirely to all phases of research from every corner of the world by the experts in their field. JEOR can provide you with the information that you need to complete vital research projects. In a day and age of rapidly changing technology. JEOR can help keep you up to date on the latest discoveries.

Current impact factor: 0.82

Impact Factor Rankings

2015 Impact Factor Available summer 2015
2013 / 2014 Impact Factor 0.815
2012 Impact Factor 0.553
2011 Impact Factor 0.412
2010 Impact Factor 0.643
2009 Impact Factor 0.498
2008 Impact Factor 0.545
2007 Impact Factor 0.368
2006 Impact Factor 0.309
2005 Impact Factor 0.367
2004 Impact Factor 0.295
2003 Impact Factor 0.278
2002 Impact Factor 0.368

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 0.65
Cited half-life 9.20
Immediacy index 0.11
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.14
Website Journal of Essential Oil Research website
Other titles Journal of essential oil research (Online), JEOR
ISSN 1041-2905
OCLC 60625407
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • On author's personal website or departmental website immediately
    • On institutional repository or subject-based repository after either 12 months embargo
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • The publisher will deposit in on behalf of authors to a designated institutional repository including PubMed Central, where a deposit agreement exists with the repository
    • STM: Science, Technology and Medicine
    • Publisher last contacted on 25/03/2014
    • This policy is an exception to the default policies of 'Taylor & Francis'
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Seeds of Psoralea corylifolia L. were irradiated with different doses of gamma rays; 2.5, 5, 10, 15 and 20 kGy from a cobalt source a at dose rate of 1.65 kGy/hour. The stimulatory effects of gamma irradiation at 10 kGy were evident for biochemical and elemental parameters at the flowering stage and thereafter declined. Nitrogen was found to be maximum in leaves and sulfur in roots at the flowering stage of seedlings grown from seeds exposed to 10 kGy. Sulfur content was found to be most sensitive to gamma irradiation doses resulting in a maximum decline in stems (89.10%), leaves (65.79%) and roots (57.07%) with 20 kGy, respectively. Amino acids exhibited a similar percent decline (52.79%) at the pre-flowering stage in plants raised from seeds irradiated with 20 kGy. Using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS) and solid-phase particle microextraction (SPME) analysis, a remarkable percent increment was confirmed in tricyclene, α-pinene, β-myrcene, camphene, caryophyllene, β-gurgenene, n-nonanal, β-(E)-ocimene, (Z)-3-hexene-ol and germacrene D in plants raised from seeds exposed to 20 kGy. Maximum oil content (1.60%) was found in seeds irradiated with 20 kGy and minimum oil content was found in control seeds (0.89%). The study demonstrates the inverse response between primary and secondary metabolites in terms of enhancement in essential oil yield, as well as concentration of antioxidant components at 15 and 20 kGy.
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 04/2015; DOI:10.1080/10412905.2015.1024890
  • Rajkesh Koundal, Ashish Kumar, Soni Thakur, Vijai K Agnihotri, Gopi Chand, Rakesh D. Singh
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Essential oil from Juniperus communis needles were examined in three different seasons (spring, rainy and winter) throughout the year for the analysis of yield and chemical composition. Volatiles of the needles were obtained by hydrodistillation process using clevenger type apparatus. The essential oil yield in all the seasons was not significantly changed and was found ranged from 0.29% (rainy), 0.3 (winter) to and 0.33% (v/w spring). Highest essential oil yield (0.33%) obtained in spring season and lowest (0.29%) was observed in rainy season. Chemical composition of the oils were analyzed by GC and GC-MS techniques on DB-5 capillary column resulted in identification of twenty eight components. Identified components accounted for 90.4-91.1% of the total oils. The major class of compounds identified in present essential oil was monoterpene hydrocarbons (51.9-63.7%) with sabinene (30.1-37.1%) as the major constituent. Other compounds characterized in all the seasons were limonene (11.3-15.7%), α-terpineol (9.1-10.5%), α-pinene (3.6-7.9%), -cadinene (0.3-4.6%), cis-sabinene hydrate (3.6-4.2%), myrcene (2.5-3.1%), α-terpinene (2.3-2.8%) and manool (1.3-2.2%). In present experiment, spring season was found most appropriate for the isolation of higher essential oil yield and winter was found to be most suitable time for the isolation of sabinene and limonene.
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 04/2015; DOI:10.1080/10412905.2015.1043399
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study is to determine the yield and composition of the essential oil of cornmint (Mentha arvensis L.) grown in the irrigation area of Santiago del Estero, Argentina. Field tests were carried out under irrigation conditions, harvesting when 70% flowering was reached (in the summer and at the end of the winter seasons). Essential oil yields were 2% in the first cut and 1.6% in the second cut, respectively, the major constituents of the essential oil being menthol, menthone, isomenthone and menthofuran. In both cases, a high concentration of menthol was obtained, although during the winter the content decreased, increasing the concentration of menthofuran. It is concluded that during the summer a higher yield and better quality of essential oil are produced.
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 03/2015; 27(2). DOI:10.1080/10412905.2014.990642
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS) analysis of Aloysia gratissima (Gill. et Hook) Tronc. essential oil obtained by hydrodistillation lead to the identification of twenty-two compounds. The major compounds found in this study were 1,8-cineole (13.7%), germacrene D (13.4%), β-caryophyllene (12.7%) and β-pinene (11.7%). The oil demonstrated antibacterial and antifungal activities against mainly Bacillus cereus and Trichophyton mentagrophytes. Aloysia gratissima oil was also screened for its antioxidant activity by 2,2-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical; however, it was less effective than butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT). These findings suggest feasible application of A. gratissima essential oil as an antimicrobial agent and its chemical characteristic may lead to the extraction of active compounds in isolated or combined forms with useful applications.
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 03/2015; 27(2). DOI:10.1080/10412905.2015.1006737
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study focused on the recovered essential oil of Yulania denudata fresh flowers obtained from hydrosol, the main by-product of Y. denudata essential oil production. The yield percentage and chemical profile of the recovered oil (extracted from the hydrosol by adsorption and solvent extraction, respectively) were investigated and compared with those of the decanted oil (obtained directly by field distillation of fresh flowers). Decanted oil accounted for 91.3–92.1% and recovered oil 7.9–8.7% of the total oil yield. The decanted oil was rich in hydrocarbons (78.2%), whereas the recovered oil was rich in organoleptically important oxygenated compounds (99.1–99.5%). For the recovery of dissolved essential oil from Y. denudata hydrosol, adsorption using activated carbon was preferred over diethyl ether extraction due to higher efficiency and lower solvent consumption. The recovered oil is a rich source of eucalyptol, which finds uses in the fragrance and pharmaceutical industries.
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 03/2015; 27(2). DOI:10.1080/10412905.2014.982875
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Essential oils (EO) from aromatic plants (AP) are used in ruminants’ diets due to several biological activities. The inclusion of AP in ruminants’ diets can be done as dried material, as they are harvested once a year. However, storage is one of the main factors that affect the EO content and chemical composition. Thus, the objective of this study was to determine the effect of storage, in the shade under ambient conditions, on the EO content and chemical composition (a) of Origanum vulgare spp. hirtum as a whole plant (OP) and/or (b) as the powdered form after mixing with the concentrate diet. The results showed that storage of the whole OP in the shade for six months has a very low EO loss (5.8%), while grinding and mixing OP with concentrates causes different losses, which depend on the OP/concentrate ratio and the storage period.
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 02/2015; DOI:10.1080/10412905.2015.1009562
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Artemisia sieberi Besser (Asteraceae) is locally known as ‘dermaneh’ in Iran. It is traditionally used for treatment of different ailments. Thirteen samples of A. sieberi essential oils from Iran and France were analyzed by gas chromatography–flame ionization detector (GC–FID) and GC–mass spectrometry (GC–MS). The antimicrobial activities of A. sieberi oils and their main components were evaluated against some food pathogens by disc diffusion and microbroth dilution assays. Their antioxidant activities were also evaluated by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl assay. The results of chemical composition analysis of A. sieberi essential oils showed the presence of β-thujone (0–11.6%), camphor (2.8-42.9%), 1,8-cineole (0.0-48.7%) and α-thujone (0-62.1%). The results of antimicrobial evaluations showed that all essential oils had the same antimicrobial activity and the most sensitive microorganisms to A. sieberi oils were Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans, followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. Aspergillus niger was the most resistant one to A. sieberi oils. The antimicrobial activities of α-thujone, camphor and 1,8-cineole were stronger than that of A. sieberi oils. There was a significant difference among the antioxidant activities of essential oils. The antioxidant activity of 1,8-cineole was higher than the other main components.
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 01/2015; 27(2):1-8. DOI:10.1080/10412905.2014.1001526
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Essential oils (EO) from aromatic plants (AP) are used in ruminants’ diets due to several biological activities. The inclusion of AP in ruminants’ diets can be done as dried material, as they are harvested once a year. However, storage is one of the main factors that affect the EO content and chemical composition. Thus, the objective of this study was to determine the effect of storage, in the shade under ambient conditions, on the EO content and chemical composition (a) of Origanum vulgare spp. hirtum as a whole plant (OP) and/or (b) as the powdered form after mixing with the concentrate diet. The results showed that storage of the whole OP in the shade for six months has a very low EO loss (5.8%), while grinding and mixing OP with concentrates causes different losses, which depend on the OP/concentrate ratio and the storage period.
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 01/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The essential oil of Hedychium spicatum rhizome is used in perfumery and medicines. The rhizome is reported to be stomachic, carminative, bronchodilator stimulant and tonic. For studying seasonal variation of its volatiles composition, the rhizomes of H. spicatum were collected from CSIR-IHBT, Palampur, Himachal Pradesh, India. To study the spatial diversity in essential oil content and composition, the rhizomes were collected from five different locations of Himachal Pradesh. Essential oils obtained by hydro-distillation were evaluated for their chemical composition by GC and GC/MS analyses. Twenty-two compounds were identified from the rhizome oil with major components as 1,8-cineole, β-eudesmol, β-pinene and 10-epi-γ-eudesmol. All the essential oil samples were evaluated for their antioxidant activity by DPPH radical-scavenging activity. The essential oil extracted from the rhizomes collected from Biling had highest antioxidant activity, hence it was also tested for cytotoxic activity against C-6, A549 and SiHa cell lines.
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 01/2015; 27(3):217-224. DOI:10.1080/10412905.2015.1006738
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The present study was designed to assess differences in chemical composition and antioxidant potential of essential oils and oleoresins from fresh and sun-dried Mentha longifolia L. Essential oils and oleoresins were obtained by hydrodistillation and solvent extraction (n-hexane and ethanol), respectively. The chemical profile was evaluated by using gas chromatography (GC) and GC coupled to mass spectrometry (GC–MS). Antioxidant effectiveness was examined by five different methods, namely the ferric thiocyanate (FTC) method, the 2,2’-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging method, determination of the metal chelating power, and determination of the peroxide and thiobarbituric acid values in mustard oil at 0.02% concentration. The chemical composition was dominated by the presence of piperitenone oxide, an oxygenated monoterpene whose composition varied from 23.2% to 88.5% in both essential oils and oleoresins. Based on the antioxidant potential of essential oils, oleoresins and synthetic antioxidants can be sorted in the following descending order: butylatedhydroxytoluene > dried mint essential oil > fresh mint essential oil > propyl gallate > fresh mint ethanol oleoresin > dried mint ethanol oleoresin > dried mint hexane oleoresin > fresh mint hexane oleoresin. The drying process has a significant influence on the qualitative and quantitative content of the extracted substances.
    Journal of Essential Oil Research 01/2015; 27(1). DOI:10.1080/10412905.2014.977455