Critical Reviews in Clinical Laboratory Sciences (CRIT REV CL LAB SCI )

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Description

Topics: Medical biochemistry; Microbiology and infectious disease; Laboratory hematology; Clinical hematology; Molecular biology; Cellular biology; Toxicology; Advances in pharmacology.

Impact factor 7.00

  • Hide impact factor history
     
    Impact factor
  • 5-year impact
    5.14
  • Cited half-life
    8.60
  • Immediacy index
    0.57
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    1.49
  • Website
    Critical Reviews in Clinical Laboratory Sciences website
  • Other titles
    Critical reviews in clinical laboratory sciences, Chemical Rubber Company critical reviews in clinical laboratory sciences, CRC critical reviews in clinical laboratory sciences
  • ISSN
    1040-8363
  • OCLC
    1151594
  • Material type
    Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • On author's personal website or departmental website immediately
    • On institutional repository or subject-based repository after either 12 months embargo for STM, Behavioural Science and Public Health Journals or 18 months embargo for SSH journals
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • The publisher will deposit in on behalf of authors to a designated institutional repository including PubMed Central, where a deposit agreement exists with the repository
    • STM: Science, Technology and Medicine
    • SSH: Social Science and Humanities
    • Publisher last contacted on 25/03/2014
    • 'Taylor & Francis (Psychology Press)' is an imprint of 'Taylor & Francis'
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of this review article is to give an update on the state of the art of the immunoassay methods for the measurement of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and its related peptides. Using chromatographic procedures, several studies reported an increasing number of circulating peptides related to BNP in human plasma of patients with heart failure. These peptides may have reduced or even no biological activity. Furthermore, other studies have suggested that, using immunoassays that are considered specific for BNP, the precursor of the peptide hormone, proBNP, constitutes a major portion of the peptide measured in plasma of patients with heart failure. Because BNP immunoassay methods show large (up to 50%) systematic differences in values, the use of identical decision values for all immunoassay methods, as suggested by the most recent international guidelines, seems unreasonable. Since proBNP significantly cross-reacts with all commercial immunoassay methods considered specific for BNP, manufacturers should test and clearly declare the degree of cross-reactivity of glycosylated and non-glycosylated proBNP in their BNP immunoassay methods. Clinicians should take into account that there are large systematic differences between methods when they compare results from different laboratories that use different BNP immunoassays. On the other hand, clinical laboratories should take part in external quality assessment (EQA) programs to evaluate the bias of their method in comparison to other BNP methods. Finally, the authors believe that the development of more specific methods for the active peptide, BNP1–32, should reduce the systematic differences between methods and result in better harmonization of results.
    Critical Reviews in Clinical Laboratory Sciences 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Atherosclerosis is a life-long illness that begins with risk factors, which in turn contribute to the development of subclinical disease, followed by the establishment of overt cardiovascular disease (CVD). Thrombotic-occlusive complications of atherosclerosis are among the most widespread and costly health problems. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL) plays an important role in atherogenesis by promoting an inflammatory environment and lipid deposition in the arterial wall. As cardiovascular events occur in individuals without common risk factors, there is a need for additional tools that may help in CVD risk assessment and management. The use of biomarkers has improved diagnostic, therapeutic and prognostic outcome in cardiovascular medicine. This review elaborates on the value of circulating OxLDL as a biomarker of CVD. Three enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (4E6, DLH3 and E06) using murine monoclonal antibodies for determination of OxLDL blood levels have been developed. However, none of these assays are currently approved for routine clinical practice. We identified studies investigating OxLDL in CVD (measured by 4E6, DLH3 or E06 assay) by searching the PubMed database. Circulating OxLDL was found to be associated with all stages of atherosclerosis, from early atherogenesis to hypertension, coronary and peripheral arterial disease, acute coronary syndromes and ischemic cerebral infarction. The results of studies investigating the usefulness of OxLDL for CVD prediction were also summarized. Furthermore, OxLDL was found to be associated with pathologic conditions linked to CVD, including diabetes mellitus, obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetS). In addition, we have addressed the mechanisms by which OxLDL promotes atherogenesis, and the effects of antiatherogenic treatments on circulating OxLDL. Finally, we highlight the evidence suggesting that lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)] is the preferential carrier of oxidized phospholipids (OxPL) in human plasma. A strong association between OxPL/apoB level (representing the content of OxPL on apolipoprotein B-100 particles, measured by E06 assay) and Lp(a) has been determined.
    Critical Reviews in Clinical Laboratory Sciences 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Cardiac troponin is the preferred biomarker for defining the acute coronary syndrome and acute myocardial infarction. Currently, the only decision limit formally endorsed with regard to the cardiac troponins is the 99th percentile. This is a “rule-in” criterion, intended to ensure that only persons with the acute coronary syndrome are reviewed. The 99th percentile is an arbitrary cut point and there are many problems associated with its application, including defining a truly healthy population, the difficulty of standardisation of cardiac troponin assays, especially but not only cardiac troponin I, and the effects of age and sex on this parameter. The Emergency Department (ED) screens many more persons for possible acute coronary syndromes than actually have the condition and their needs are best met by a “rule-out” test that enables them to clear their busy departments of the many persons who do not actually have the condition. The needs of the ED are not optimally met using the 99th percentile. The index of individuality for the cardiac troponins is small and significant changes consistent with an acute coronary syndrome can occur without the 99th percentile being exceeded. It appears that the ED may be better served by use of delta troponin changes rather than the 99th percentile, but there are problems with this approach, particularly in persons who present late when troponin release has plateaued. In addition, there are many non-acute coronary syndrome causes for cardiac troponin release. The needs of the cardiologist and the ED physician are so different that it may be inappropriate for both groups to use the same diagnostic criteria for cardiac troponin, and it is of great importance that cardiac troponin measurement be used as only one part of the assessment of the person presenting with possible acute coronary syndrome.
    Critical Reviews in Clinical Laboratory Sciences 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Calcium, the fifth most common element in the body, plays major physiological functions. Measurement of blood calcium is one of the most commonly ordered laboratory tests in assessments of calcium homeostasis and disease diagnosis. Hypercalcemia is an increased level of calcium in the blood. This disorder is most commonly caused by primary hyperparathyroidism and malignancy. However, other less common causes of elevated calcium levels need to be considered when making a differential diagnosis. This review is intended to provide readers with a better understanding of calcium homeostasis and the causes and pathophysiology of hypercalcemia. Most importantly, this review describes useful approaches for laboratory scientists and clinicians to appropriately diagnose and assess hypercalcemia.
    Critical Reviews in Clinical Laboratory Sciences 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Oxidative stress refers to cellular or molecular damage caused by reactive oxygen species, which especially occurs in age-related conditions as a result of an imbalance between the production of reactive oxygen species and the antioxidant defense response. Dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and exfoliation syndrome (XFS) are two common and complex age-related conditions that can cause irreversible vision loss. Two subtypes of AMD, which is the leading cause of blindness in the Western world, exist: the most prevalent dry type and the most severe wet type. Early dry AMD is characterized by formation of drusen, which are sub-retinal deposits, in the macular area and may progress to geographic atrophy with more dramatic manifestation. XFS is a systemic disorder of the extracellular matrix characterized by the accumulation of elastic fibrils that leads, in most cases, to glaucoma development with progressive and irreversible vision loss. Due to the aging population, the prevalence of these already-widespread conditions is increasing and is resulting in significant economic and psychological costs for individuals and for society. The exact composition of the abnormal drusen and XFS material as well as the mechanisms responsible for their production and accumulation still remain elusive, and consequently treatment for both diseases is lacking. However, recent epidemiologic, genetic and molecular studies support a major role for oxidative stress in both dry AMD and XFS development. Understanding the early molecular events in their pathogenesis and the exact role of oxidative stress may provide novel opportunities for therapeutic intervention for the prevention of progression to advanced disease.
    Critical Reviews in Clinical Laboratory Sciences 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Severe hyperkalemia is a potentially life-threatening condition requiring immediate medical intervention. Pseudohyperkalemia can be misleading and result in incorrect interpretation and inappropriate patient management. Immediate recognition and appropriate interpretation of pseudohyperkalemia, on the other hand, prevents misdiagnosis and unnecessary intervention. Pseudohyperkalemia is induced by hemolysis and excessive leakage of potassium from cells during or after blood collection. It has been increasingly seen in many hematological disorders such as leukocytosis and thrombocytosis. Reverse pseudohyperkalemia has recently been reported in leukemic patients in whom the plasma potassium levels are greater than the serum potassium levels because of heparin-induced cell membrane damage. Although pseudohyperkalemia has long been recognized and understood, it continues to be misinterpreted. To improve patient care, an algorithm for investigation of pseudohyperkalemia and preventive measures should be established and implemented in the clinical laboratory.
    Critical Reviews in Clinical Laboratory Sciences 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Despite great progress in prevention strategies, pharmacotherapy and interventional treatment of coronary artery disease (CAD), cardiovascular events still constitute the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the modern world. Traditional risk factors, including hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking, obesity, dyslipidemia, and positive family history account for the occurrence of the majority of these events, but not all of them. Adequate risk assessment remains the most challenging in individuals classified into low or intermediate risk categories. Inflammation plays a key role in the initiation and promotion of atherosclerosis and may lead to acute coronary syndrome (ACS) by the induction of plaque instability. For this reason, numerous inflammatory markers have been extensively investigated as potential candidates for the enhancement of cardiovascular risk assessment. This review aims to critically assess the clinical utility of well-established (C-reactive protein [CRP] and fibrinogen), newer (lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 [Lp-PLA2] and myeloperoxidase [MPO]) and novel (growth differentiation factor-15 [GDF-15]) inflammatory markers which, reflect different pathophysiological pathways underlying CAD. Although according to the traditional approach all discussed inflammatory markers were shown to be associated with the risk of future cardiovascular events in individuals with and without CAD, their clear clinical utility remains not fully elucidated. Current recommendations of numerous scientific societies predominantly advocate routine assessment of CRP in healthy people with intermediate cardiovascular risk. However, these recommendations substantially vary in their strength among particular societies. These discrepancies have a multifactorial background, including: (i) the strong prognostic value of CRP supported by solid scientific evidence and proven to be comparable in magnitude with that of total and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, or hypertension, (ii) favourable analytical characteristics of commercially available CRP assays, (iii) lack of CRP specificity and causal relationship between CRP concentration and cardiovascular risk, and (iv) CRP dependence on other classical risk factors. Of major importance, CRP measurement in healthy men ≥50 years of age or healthy women ≥60 years of age with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol <130 mg/dL may be helpful in the selection of patients for statin therapy. Additionally, evaluation of CRP and fibrinogen or Lp-PLA2 may be considered to facilitate risk stratification in ACS patients and in healthy individuals with intermediate cardiovascular risk, respectively. Nevertheless, the clinical utility of CRP requires further investigation in a broad spectrum of CAD patients, while other promising inflammatory markers, particularly GDF-15 and Lp-PLA2, should be tested in individuals both with and without established CAD. Further studies should also focus on novel performance metrics such as measures of discrimination, calibration and reclassification, in order to better address the clinical utility of investigated biomarkers and to avoid misleadingly optimistic results. It also has to be emphasized that, due to the multifactorial pathogenesis of CAD, detailed risk stratification remains a complex process also involving, beyond assessment of inflammatory biomarkers, the patient's clinical characteristics, results of imaging examinations, electrocardiographic findings and other laboratory parameters (e.g. lipid profile, indices of renal function, markers of left ventricular overload and fibrosis, and biomarkers of myocardial necrosis, preferably cardiac troponins).
    Critical Reviews in Clinical Laboratory Sciences 10/2014; 51(5):263-79.
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    ABSTRACT: Celiac disease is a complex immune-mediated disorder that is triggered by ingestion of gluten and related proteins in genetically susceptible individuals. Under conditions of increased intestinal permeability, gluten-derived peptides can travel across the intestinal epithelium and undergo deamidation catalyzed by the tissue transglutaminase (TTG) enzyme. This renders them immunogenic in individuals expressing specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA) DQ heterodimers. The resulting immune response is characterized by the production of antibodies against both deamidated gliadin peptides (DGP) and TTG, generation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and activation of cytotoxic T cells. This response damages the intestinal epithelium resulting in the wide range of gastrointestinal and systemic symptoms observed in those with celiac disease. Celiac disease diagnosis has traditionally been based on biopsy and histological examination of the small intestine. While this approach is still considered the gold standard, it is invasive and susceptible to both false-positive and false-negative results. Several laboratory tests have become available to aid in the diagnosis and monitoring of celiac disease, and are the focus of this review. These include serological tests for celiac disease-specific antibodies such as anti-endomysial antibodies, anti-TTG antibodies and anti-DGP antibodies of both the immunoglobulin A (IgA) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) class, genetic tests to elucidate HLA DQ status and ancillary tests such as total IgA. While some have suggested that laboratory tests may replace intestinal biopsy in specific circumstances, others maintain that this procedure remains a critical component of celiac disease diagnosis. We review the analytical methodology, strengths, weaknesses, diagnostic performance and clinical utility of the various laboratory tests for celiac disease. Potential future markers and tests that are now considered obsolete are also discussed. Current clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of celiac disease from the European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, the American College of Gastroenterology and the World Gastroenterology Organisation are summarized, and important differences between these guidelines are highlighted.
    Critical Reviews in Clinical Laboratory Sciences 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Personalized medicine is an emerging field with a goal of applying genomic information as a predictor of disease risk as well as individualization of drug therapy. For optimization of drug therapy, significant progress has been made in the past decade in linking genetic variation in genes associated with drug disposition to prediction of drug response and adverse reactions. For most drugs in clinical use, the interplay of many factors, including genetics, demographics, drug–drug interactions, disease states and the environment, result in the interindividual variability observed during drug therapy. Broadly speaking, such determinants of drug response are mediated through modulation of drug concentrations reflective of pharmacokinetic factors, as well as drug targets, often referred to as pharmacodynamics. It is clear that for personalized medicine to become clinically meaningful, genomic as well as clinical and environmental influences must be considered together. We show, for a number of drugs in clinical use, that genomics-guided treatment options not only are becoming feasible but are also on the cusp of showing superiority in terms of clinical outcomes as well as cost-benefit. One of the most widely studied drugs with regard to genomics-guided dosing options is the oral anticoagulant, warfarin. Genetic polymorphisms in the gene encoding cytochrome P450 2C9 (CYP2C9) and those in the target gene responsible for the warfarin anticoagulant effect, vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKORC1), account for much of the variability in the warfarin maintenance dose; however, routine genotyping in warfarin therapy remains controversial. We will outline the importance of understanding all of the variables that mediate warfarin response as the prerequisite to successful utilization of genotype-guided warfarin therapy. Similarly, HMG Co-A reductase inhibitors, commonly known as statins, also display wide interindividual variability in plasma concentration, response and toxicity due in part to polymorphisms in transporter genes, including SLCO1B1 and ABCG2. Genetic factors are also important considerations in treatment with other therapeutic agents discussed, including clopidogrel and tamoxifen. Implementation of personalized medicine-based treatment options for these and other drugs, the pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics of which are impacted by functional genetic variations, will require overcoming a number of challenges, including cost, turnaround time, and demonstration of clinical benefit, as well as better training of health care professionals about genomics in general, and pharmacogenomics in particular.
    Critical Reviews in Clinical Laboratory Sciences 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are transcripts without protein-coding capacity; initially regarded as “transcriptional noise”, lately they have emerged as essential factors in both cell biology and mechanisms of disease. In this article, we present basic knowledge of lncRNA molecular mechanisms, associated physiological processes and cancer association, as well as their diagnostic and therapeutic value in the form of a decalog: (1) Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are transcripts without protein-coding capacity divided by size (short and long ncRNAs), function (housekeeping RNA and regulatory RNA) and direction of transcription (sense/antisense, bidirectional, intronic and intergenic), containing a broad range of molecules with diverse properties and functions, such as messenger RNA, transfer RNA, microRNA and long non-coding RNAs. (2) Long non-coding RNAs are implicated in many molecular mechanisms, such as transcriptional regulation, post-transcriptional regulation and processing of other short ncRNAs. (3) Long non-coding RNAs play an important role in many physiological processes such as X-chromosome inactivation, cell differentiation, immune response and apoptosis. (4) Long non-coding RNAs have been linked to hallmarks of cancer: (a) sustaining proliferative signaling; (b) evading growth suppressors; (c) enabling replicative immortality; (d) activating invasion and metastasis; (e) inducing angiogenesis; (f) resisting cell death; and (g) reprogramming energy metabolism. (5) Regarding their impact on cancer cells, lncRNAs are divided into two groups: oncogenic and tumor-suppressor lncRNAs. (6) Studies of lncRNA involvement in cancer usually analyze deregulated expression patterns at the RNA level as well as the effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms and copy number variations at the DNA level. (7) Long non-coding RNAs have potential as novel biomarkers due to tissue-specific expression patterns, efficient detection in body fluids and high stability. (8) LncRNAs serve as novel biomarkers for diagnostic, prognostic and monitoring purposes. (9) Tissue specificity of lncRNAs enables the development of selective therapeutic options. (10) Long non-coding RNAs are emerging as commercial biomarkers and therapeutic agents.
    Critical Reviews in Clinical Laboratory Sciences 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: In recent years, the high-density lipoprotein (HDL) hypothesis has been challenged. Several completed randomized clinical trials continue to fall short in demonstrating HDL, or at least HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) levels, as being a consistent target in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. However, population studies and findings in lipid modifying trials continue to strongly support HDL-C as a superb risk predictor. It is increasingly evident that the complexity of HDL metabolism confounds the use of HDL-C concentration as a unified target. However, important insights continue to emerge from the post hoc analyses of recently completed (i) fibrate-based FIELD and ACCORD trials, including the unexpected beneficial effect of fibrates in microvascular diseases, (ii) the niacin-based AIM-HIGH and HPS2-THRIVE studies, (iii) recombinant HDL-based as well as (iv) the completed CETP inhibitor-based trials. These together with on-going mechanistic studies on novel pathways, which include the unique roles of microRNAs, post-translational remodeling of HDL and novel pathways related to HDL modulators will provide valuable insights to guide how best to refocus and redesign the conceptual framework for selecting HDL-based targets.
    Critical Reviews in Clinical Laboratory Sciences 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Bladder cancer (BC) is a heterogeneous disease. Approximately 75% of patients present with non-muscle-invasive BC (NMIBC), which has a high recurrence rate and a low but unpredictable progression rate. Conversely, patients with muscle-invasive BC (MIBC) are at high risk for progression and cancer-specific mortality, but, again, disease behavior is unpredictable. To date, risk assessment for tumor recurrence and progression is based on clinico-pathological factors only. A risk assessment calculator that is based on several such parameters is available for NMIBC, but it has been reported to have potential flaws. In the last two decades, great effort has been made to evaluate the prognostic and predictive role of several molecular markers in MIBC and, even more so, in NMIBC, where the need for more precise risk stratification is urgently needed. This review addresses current evidence for the role of several molecular markers easily assessable by immunohistochemical techniques in prognosticating/predicting the outcome of NMIBC and MIBC. To date, because of divergent results among the many studies, no molecular marker has yet entered routine clinical practice; however, some of them (e.g., p53, pRb, p21, and survivin) have proved their predictive value in studies that included a homogeneous patient population on standardized treatment, and, therefore, are probably ready for clinical validation on a larger scale. Even more interesting is the possibility of constructing multimarker panels that could be used in routine clinical practice, as all these markers can easily be evaluated by immunohistochemistry on routine surgical pathology specimens. The molecular markers described herein hold promise for becoming widely available and cost-effective tools for reliable risk assessment, which would represent a great advancement in counseling patients, in selecting them for neoadjuvant and adjuvant treatments, and in determining their eligibility for clinical trials.
    Critical Reviews in Clinical Laboratory Sciences 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) is a common event in hospitals, with reported incidences ranging from 1 to 30%. Patients with underlying kidney disease have an increased risk of developing CIN. Point-of-care (POC) creatinine devices are handheld devices capable of providing quantitative data on a patient’s kidney function that could be useful in stratifying preventive measures. This overview aims to synthesize the current evidence on diagnostic accuracy and clinical utility of POC creatinine devices in detecting patients at risk of CIN. Five databases were searched for diagnostic accuracy studies or clinical trials that evaluated the usefulness of POC devices in detecting patients at risk of CIN. Selected articles were critically appraised to assess their individual risk of bias by the use of standard criteria; 13 studies were found that addressed the diagnostic accuracy or clinical utility of POC creatinine devices. Most studies incurred a moderate to high risk of bias. Overall concordance between POC devices and reference standards (clinical laboratory procedures) was found to be moderate, with 95% limits of agreement often lying between −35.4 and +35.4 µmol/L (−0.4 and +0.4 mg/dL). Concordance was shown to decrease with worsening kidney function. Data on the clinical utility of these devices were limited, but a significant reduction in time to diagnosis was reported in two studies. Overall, POC creatinine devices showed a moderate concordance with standard clinical laboratory creatinine measurements. Several biases could have induced optimism in these estimations. Results obtained from these devices may be unreliable in cases of severe kidney failure. Randomized trials are needed to address the clinical utility of these devices.
    Critical Reviews in Clinical Laboratory Sciences 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Ubiquitination, a fundamental post-translational modification (PTM) resulting in the covalent attachment of ubiquitin (Ub) to a target protein, is currently implicated in several key cellular processes. Although ubiquitination was initially associated with protein degradation, it is becoming increasingly evident that proteins labeled with polyUb chains of specific topology and length are activated in an ever-expanding repertoire of specific cellular processes. In addition to their involvement in the classical protein degradation pathways they are involved in DNA repair, kinase regulation and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling. The sorting and processing of distinct Ub signals is mediated by small protein motifs, known as Ub-binding domains (UBDs), which are found in proteins that execute disparate biological functions. The involvement of UBDs in several biological pathways has been revealed by several studies which have highlighted the vital role of UBDs in cellular homeostasis. Importantly, functional impairment of UBDs in key regulatory pathways has been related to the development of pathophysiological conditions, including immune disorders and cancer. In this review, we present an up-to-date account of the crucial role of UBDs and their functions, with a special emphasis on their functional impairment in key biological pathways and the pathogenesis of several human diseases. The still under-investigated topic of Ub-UBD interactions as a target for developing novel therapeutic strategies against many diseases is also discussed.
    Critical Reviews in Clinical Laboratory Sciences 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract This review focuses on the promising potential of nucleic acids in body fluids such as blood and urine as diagnostic, prognostic, predictive and monitoring biomarkers in urologic malignancies. The tremendous progress in the basic knowledge of molecular processes in cancer, as shown in the companion review on nucleic acid-based biomarkers in tissue of urologic tumors, provides a strong rationale for using these molecular changes as non-invasive markers in body fluids. The changes observed in body fluids are an integrative result, reflecting both tissue changes and processes occurring in the body fluids. The availability of sensitive methods has only recently made possible detailed studies of DNA- and RNA-based markers in body fluids. In addition to these biological aspects, methodological aspects of the determination of nucleic acids in body fluids, i.e. pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical issues, are particularly emphasized. The characteristic changes of RNA (differential mRNA and miRNA expression) and DNA (concentrations, integrity index, mutations, microsatellite and methylation alterations) in serum/plasma and urine samples of patients suffering from the essential urologic cancers of the prostate, bladder, kidney and testis are summarized and critically discussed below. To translate the promising results into clinical practice, laboratory scientists and clinicians have to collaborate to resolve the challenges of harmonized and feasible pre-analytical and analytical conditions for the selected markers and to validate these markers in well-designed and sufficiently powered multi-center studies.
    Critical Reviews in Clinical Laboratory Sciences 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Molecular biomarkers play an important role in the clinical management of cancer patients. Biomarkers allow estimation of the risk of developing cancer; help to diagnose a tumor, ideally at an early stage when cure is still possible; and aid in monitoring disease progression. Furthermore, they hold the potential to predict the outcome of the disease (prognostic biomarkers) and the response to therapy (predictive biomarkers). Altogether, biomarkers will help to avoid tumor-related deaths and reduce overtreatment, and will contribute to increased survival and quality of life in cancer patients due to personalized treatments. It is well established that the process of carcinogenesis is a complex interplay between genomic predisposition, acquired somatic mutations, epigenetic changes and genomic aberrations. Within this complex interplay, nucleic acids, i.e. RNA and DNA, play a fundamental role and therefore represent ideal candidates for biomarkers. They are particularly promising candidates because sequence-specific hybridization and amplification technologies allow highly accurate and sensitive assessment of these biomarker levels over a broad dynamic range. This article provides an overview of nucleic acid-based biomarkers in tissues for the management of urologic malignancies, i.e. tumors of the prostate, testis, kidney, penis, urinary bladder, renal pelvis, ureter and other urinary organs. Special emphasis is put on genomic, transcriptomic and epigenomic biomarkers (SNPs, mutations [genomic and mitochondrial], microsatellite instabilities, viral and bacterial DNA, DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation, mRNA expression, and non-coding RNAs [lncRNA, miRNA, siRNA, piRNA, snRNA, snoRNA]). Due to the multitude of published biomarker candidates, special focus is given to the general applicability of different molecular classes as biomarkers and some particularly promising nucleic acid biomarkers. Furthermore, specific challenges regarding the development and clinical implementation of nucleic acid-based biomarkers are discussed.
    Critical Reviews in Clinical Laboratory Sciences 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract A genetic etiology for autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) was first suggested from twin studies reported in the 1970s. The identification of gene mutations in syndromic ASDs provided evidence to support a genetic cause of ASDs. More recently, genome-wide copy number variant and sequence analyses have uncovered a list of rare and highly penetrant copy number variants (CNVs) or single nucleotide variants (SNVs) associated with ASDs, which has strengthened the claim of a genetic etiology for ASDs. Findings from research studies in the genetics of ASD now support an important role for molecular diagnostics in the clinical genetics evaluation of ASDs. Various molecular diagnostic assays including single gene tests, targeted multiple gene panels and copy number analysis should all be considered in the clinical genetics evaluation of ASDs. Whole exome sequencing could also be considered in selected clinical cases. However, the challenge that remains is to determine the causal role of genetic variants identified through molecular testing. Variable expressivity, pleiotropic effects and incomplete penetrance associated with CNVs and SNVs also present significant challenges for genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis.
    Critical Reviews in Clinical Laboratory Sciences 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Referee: C. Morgan, School of Environmental and Life Sciences. University of Salford, U.K.
    Critical Reviews in Clinical Laboratory Sciences 09/2008; 38(6):441-519.