The Plant Cell (PLANT CELL)

Publisher: American Society of Plant Physiologists; American Society of Plant Biologists, American Society of Plant Biologists

Journal description

The Plant Cell, which is published monthly (one volume per year) by the American Society of Plant Biologists (ASPB), is in its 13th year of publication. Within three years of its initial publication, The Plant Cell ranked first in impact among journals publishing primary research in the plant sciences. It has continued to maintain this standard of excellence ever since. The Plant Cell was founded on four key tenets: (1) to publish the most exciting, cutting-edge research in plant cellular and molecular biology, (2) to provide the most rapid turn-around time possible for reviewing and publishing a research paper, (3) to feature the highest quality reproduction of data, and (4) to provide, in the front section of the journal, a more interactive format for commentaries, opinion pieces, and the exchange of information and ideas in review articles, meeting reports, and insightful overviews of featured research papers. Moreover, our all-review issues, each of which focuses on a specific area of plant biology, are highly regarded teaching and reference tools. Those highlighting Plant-Microbe Interactions and Plant Vegetative Development are available for purchase by individuals.

Current impact factor: 9.58

Impact Factor Rankings

2015 Impact Factor Available summer 2015
2013 / 2014 Impact Factor 9.575
2012 Impact Factor 9.251
2011 Impact Factor 8.987
2010 Impact Factor 9.396
2009 Impact Factor 9.293
2008 Impact Factor 9.296
2007 Impact Factor 9.653
2006 Impact Factor 9.868
2005 Impact Factor 11.088
2004 Impact Factor 11.295
2003 Impact Factor 10.679
2002 Impact Factor 10.751
2001 Impact Factor 11.081
2000 Impact Factor 11.093
1999 Impact Factor 10.463
1998 Impact Factor 11.757
1997 Impact Factor 9.709

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 10.13
Cited half-life 8.00
Immediacy index 1.53
Eigenfactor 0.09
Article influence 3.80
Website Plant Cell Online, The website
Other titles Plant cell online., The Plant cell
ISSN 1040-4651
OCLC 18424872
Material type Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

American Society of Plant Biologists

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • On author's personal website and institutional repository
    • State that pre-print is under review/accepted
    • Remove pre-print on publication and replace with toll-free link to publisher version
    • If funding agency rules apply, authors may post articles in PubMed Central 12 months after publication
    • Must link to publisher version, toll-free link provided
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Publisher last reviewed on 25/03/2014
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • The Plant Cell 03/2015; DOI:10.1105/tpc.15.00177
  • The Plant Cell 03/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: Phosphate transporters (PTs) mediate phosphorus uptake and are regulated at the transcriptional and posttranslational levels. In one key mechanism of posttranslational regulation, phosphorylation of PTs affects their trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the plasma membrane. However, the kinase(s) mediating PT phosphorylation and the mechanism leading to ER retention of phosphorylated PTs remain unclear. In this study, we identified a rice (Oryza sativa) kinase subunit, CK2β3, which interacts with PT2 and PT8 in a yeast two-hybrid screen. Also, the CK2α3/β3 holoenzyme phosphorylates PT8 under phosphate-sufficient conditions. This phosphorylation inhibited the interaction of PT8 with PHOSPHATE TRANSPORTER TRAFFIC FACILITATOR1, a key cofactor regulating the exit of PTs from the ER to the plasma membrane. Additionally, phosphorus starvation promoted CK2β3 degradation, relieving the negative regulation of PT phosphorus-insufficient conditions. In accordance, transgenic expression of a nonphosphorylatable version of OsPT8 resulted in elevated levels of that protein at the plasma membrane and enhanced phosphorus accumulation and plant growth under various phosphorus regimes. Taken together, these results indicate that CK2α3/β3 negatively regulates PTs and phosphorus status regulates CK2α3/β3. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.
    The Plant Cell 02/2015; DOI:10.1105/tpc.114.135335
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    ABSTRACT: Catalases are key regulators of reactive oxygen species homeostasis in plant cells. However, the regulation of catalase activity is not well understood. In this study, we isolated an Arabidopsis thaliana mutant, no catalase activity1-3 (nca1-3) that is hypersensitive to many abiotic stress treatments. The mutated gene was identified by map-based cloning as NCA1, which encodes a protein containing an N-terminal RING-finger domain and a C-terminal tetratricopeptide repeat-like helical domain. NCA1 interacts with and increases catalase activity maximally in a 240-kD complex in planta. In vitro, NCA1 interacts with CATALASE2 (CAT2) in a 1:1 molar ratio, and the NCA1 C terminus is essential for this interaction. CAT2 activity increased 10-fold in the presence of NCA1, and zinc ion binding of the NCA1 N terminus is required for this increase. NCA1 has chaperone protein activity that may maintain the folding of catalase in a functional state. NCA1 is a cytosol-located protein. Expression of NCA1 in the mitochondrion of the nca1-3 mutant does not rescue the abiotic stress phenotypes of the mutant, while expression in the cytosol or peroxisome does. Our results suggest that NCA1 is essential for catalase activity. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.
    The Plant Cell 02/2015; DOI:10.1105/tpc.114.135095
  • The Plant Cell 02/2015; DOI:10.1105/tpc.15.00128
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    ABSTRACT: Membrane trafficking is required during plant immune responses, but its contribution to the hypersensitive response (HR), a form of programmed cell death (PCD) associated with effector-triggered immunity, is not well understood. HR is induced by nucleotide binding-leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) immune receptors and can involve vacuole-mediated processes, including autophagy. We previously isolated lazarus (laz) suppressors of autoimmunity-triggered PCD in the Arabidopsis thaliana mutant accelerated cell death11 (acd11) and demonstrated that the cell death phenotype is due to ectopic activation of the LAZ5 NB-LRR. We report here that laz4 is mutated in one of three VACUOLAR PROTEIN SORTING35 (VPS35) genes. We verify that LAZ4/VPS35B is part of the retromer complex, which functions in endosomal protein sorting and vacuolar trafficking. We show that VPS35B acts in an endosomal trafficking pathway and plays a role in LAZ5-dependent acd11 cell death. Furthermore, we find that VPS35 homologs contribute to certain forms of NB-LRR protein-mediated autoimmunity as well as pathogen-triggered HR. Finally, we demonstrate that retromer deficiency causes defects in late endocytic/lytic compartments and impairs autophagy-associated vacuolar processes. Our findings indicate important roles of retromer-mediated trafficking during the HR; these may include endosomal sorting of immune components and targeting of vacuolar cargo. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.
    The Plant Cell 02/2015; 27(2). DOI:10.1105/tpc.114.132043
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    ABSTRACT: Brassinosteroids (BRs) play important roles in plant development and the response to environmental cues. BIL1/BZR1 is a master transcription factor in BR signaling, but the mechanisms that lead to the finely tuned targeting of BIL1/BZR1 by BRs are unknown. Here, we identified BRZ-SENSITIVE-SHORT HYPOCOTYL1 (BSS1) as a negative regulator of BR signaling in a chemical-biological analysis involving brassinazole (Brz), a specific BR biosynthesis inhibitor. The bss1-1D mutant, which overexpresses BSS1, exhibited a Brz-hypersensitive phenotype in hypocotyl elongation. BSS1 encodes a BTB-POZ domain protein with ankyrin repeats, known as BLADE ON PETIOLE1 (BOP1), which is an important regulator of leaf morphogenesis. The bss1-1D mutant exhibited an increased accumulation of phosphorylated BIL1/BZR1 and a negative regulation of BR-responsive genes. The number of fluorescent BSS1/BOP1-GFP puncta increased in response to Brz treatment, and the puncta were diffused by BR treatment in the root and hypocotyl. We show that BSS1/BOP1 directly interacts with BIL1/BZR1 or BES1. The large protein complex formed between BSS1/BOP1 and BIL1/BZR1 was only detected in the cytosol. The nuclear BIL1/BZR1 increased in the BSS1/BOP1-deficient background and decreased in the BSS1/BOP1-overexpressing background. Our study suggests that the BSS1/BOP1 protein complex inhibits the transport of BIL1/BZR1 to the nucleus from the cytosol and negatively regulates BR signaling. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.
    The Plant Cell 02/2015; 27(2). DOI:10.1105/tpc.114.131508
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    ABSTRACT: Gene duplication provides resources for novel gene functions. Identification of the amino acids responsible for functional conservation and divergence of duplicated genes will strengthen our understanding of their evolutionary course. Here, we conducted a systemic functional investigation of phosphatidylethanolamine binding proteins (PEBPs) in soybean (Glycine max) and Arabidopsis thaliana. Our results demonstrated that after the ancestral duplication, the lineage of the common ancestor of the FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) and TERMINAL FLOWER1 (TFL1) subfamilies functionally diverged from the MOTHER OF FT AND TFL1 (MFT) subfamily to activate flowering and repress flowering, respectively. They also underwent further specialization after subsequent duplications. Although the functional divergence increased with duplication age, we observed rapid functional divergence for a few pairs of young duplicates in soybean. Association analysis between amino acids and functional variations identified critical amino acid residues that led to functional differences in PEBP members. Using transgenic analysis, we validated a subset of these differences. We report clear experimental evidence for the functional evolution of the PEBPs in the MFT, FT, and TFL1 subfamilies, which predate the origin of angiosperms. Our results highlight the role of amino acid divergence in driving evolutionary novelty after duplication. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.
    The Plant Cell 02/2015; DOI:10.1105/tpc.114.135103
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    ABSTRACT: Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport (ESCRT)-III proteins mediate membrane remodeling and the release of endosomal intraluminal vesicles into multivesicular bodies. Here, we show that the ESCRT-III subunit paralogs CHARGED MULTIVESICULAR BODY PROTEIN1 (CHMP1A) and CHMP1B are required for autophagic degradation of plastid proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana. Similar to autophagy mutants, chmp1a chmp1b (chmp1) plants hyperaccumulated plastid components, including proteins involved in plastid division. The autophagy machinery directed the release of bodies containing plastid material into the cytoplasm, whereas CHMP1A and B were required for delivery of these bodies to the vacuole. Autophagy was upregulated in chmp1 as indicated by an increase in vacuolar green fluorescent protein (GFP) cleavage from the autophagic reporter GFP-ATG8. However, autophagic degradation of the stromal cargo RECA-GFP was drastically reduced in the chmp1 plants upon starvation, suggesting that CHMP1 mediates the efficient delivery of autophagic plastid cargo to the vacuole. Consistent with the compromised degradation of plastid proteins, chmp1 plastids show severe morphological defects and aberrant division. We propose that CHMP1 plays a direct role in the autophagic turnover of plastid constituents. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.
    The Plant Cell 02/2015; DOI:10.1105/tpc.114.135939
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    ABSTRACT: Germination and early seedling establishment are developmental stages in which plants face limited nutrient supply as their photosynthesis mechanism is not yet active. For this reason, the plant must mobilize the nutrient reserves provided by the mother plant in order to facilitate growth. Autophagy is a catabolic process enabling the bulk degradation of cellular constituents in the vacuole. The autophagy mechanism is conserved among eukaryotes, and homologs of many autophagy-related (ATG) genes have been found in Arabidopsis thaliana. T-DNA insertion mutants (atg mutants) of these genes display higher sensitivity to various stresses, particularly nutrient starvation. However, the direct impact of autophagy on cellular metabolism has not been well studied. In this work, we used etiolated Arabidopsis seedlings as a model system for carbon starvation. atg mutant seedlings display delayed growth in response to carbon starvation compared with wild-type seedlings. High-throughput metabolomic, lipidomic, and proteomic analyses were performed, as well as extensive flux analyses, in order to decipher the underlying causes of the phenotype. Significant differences between atg mutants and wild-type plants have been demonstrated, suggesting global effects of autophagy on central metabolism during carbon starvation as well as severe energy deprivation, resulting in a morphological phenotype. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.
    The Plant Cell 02/2015; DOI:10.1105/tpc.114.134205
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    ABSTRACT: In eukaryotes, alternative splicing (AS) promotes transcriptome and proteome diversity. The extent of genome-wide AS changes occurring during a plant-microbe interaction is largely unknown. Here, using high-throughput, paired-end RNA sequencing, we generated an isoform-level spliceome map of Brachypodium distachyon infected with Panicum mosaic virus and its satellite virus. Overall, we detected ∼44,443 transcripts in B. distachyon, ∼30% more than those annotated in the reference genome. Expression of ∼28,900 transcripts was ≥2 fragments per kilobase of transcript per million mapped fragments, and ∼42% of multi-exonic genes were alternatively spliced. Comparative analysis of AS patterns in B. distachyon, rice (Oryza sativa), maize (Zea mays), sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), Arabidopsis thaliana, potato (Solanum tuberosum), Medicago truncatula, and poplar (Populus trichocarpa) revealed conserved ratios of the AS types between monocots and dicots. Virus infection quantitatively altered AS events in Brachypodium with little effect on the AS ratios. We discovered AS events for >100 immune-related genes encoding receptor-like kinases, NB-LRR resistance proteins, transcription factors, RNA silencing, and splicing-associated proteins. Cloning and molecular characterization of SCL33, a serine/arginine-rich splicing factor, identified multiple novel intron-retaining splice variants that are developmentally regulated and modulated during virus infection. B. distachyon SCL33 splicing patterns are also strikingly conserved compared with a distant Arabidopsis SCL33 ortholog. This analysis provides new insights into AS landscapes conserved among monocots and dicots and uncovered AS events in plant defense-related genes. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.
    The Plant Cell 01/2015; 27(1). DOI:10.1105/tpc.114.133991
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In eukaryotes, alternative splicing (AS) promotes transcriptome and proteome diversity. The extent of genome-wide AS changes occurring during a plant-microbe interaction is largely unknown. Here, using high-throughput, paired-end RNA sequencing, we generated an isoform-level spliceome map of Brachypodium distachyon infected with Panicum mosaic virus and its satellite virus. Overall, we detected ∼44,443 transcripts in B. distachyon, ∼30% more than those annotated in the reference genome. Expression of ∼28,900 transcripts was ≥2 fragments per kilobase of transcript per million mapped fragments, and ∼42% of multi-exonic genes were alternatively spliced. Comparative analysis of AS patterns in B. distachyon, rice (Oryza sativa), maize (Zea mays), sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), Arabidopsis thaliana, potato (Solanum tuberosum), Medicago truncatula, and poplar (Populus trichocarpa) revealed conserved ratios of the AS types between monocots and dicots. Virus infection quantitatively altered AS events in Brachypodium with little effect on the AS ratios. We discovered AS events for >100 immune-related genes encoding receptor-like kinases, NB-LRR resistance proteins, transcription factors, RNA silencing, and splicing-associated proteins. Cloning and molecular characterization of SCL33, a serine/arginine-rich splicing factor, identified multiple novel intron-retaining splice variants that are developmentally regulated and modulated during virus infection. B. distachyon SCL33 splicing patterns are also strikingly conserved compared with a distant Arabidopsis SCL33 ortholog. This analysis provides new insights into AS landscapes conserved among monocots and dicots and uncovered AS events in plant defense-related genes.
    The Plant Cell 01/2015; 27.
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    ABSTRACT: Oleaginous photosynthetic organisms such as microalgae are promising sources for biofuel production through the generation of carbon-neutral sustainable energy. However, the metabolic mechanisms driving high-rate lipid production in these oleaginous organisms remain unclear, thus impeding efforts to improve productivity through genetic modifications. We analyzed the genome and transcriptome of the oleaginous diatom Fistulifera solaris JPCC DA0580. Next-generation sequencing technology provided evidence of an allodiploid genome structure, suggesting unorthodox molecular evolutionary and genetic regulatory systems for reinforcing metabolic efficiencies. Although major metabolic pathways were shared with nonoleaginous diatoms, transcriptome analysis revealed unique expression patterns, such as concomitant upregulation of fatty acid/triacylglycerol biosynthesis and fatty acid degradation (β-oxidation) in concert with ATP production. This peculiar pattern of gene expression may account for the simultaneous growth and oil accumulation phenotype and may inspire novel biofuel production technology based on this oleaginous microalga. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.
    The Plant Cell 01/2015; 27(1). DOI:10.1105/tpc.114.135194