Contemporary nurse: a journal for the Australian nursing profession (CONTEMP NURSE )

Description

Contemporary Nurse is the preferred Asia-Pacific forum for nursing educators, researchers and practitioners who require high-quality, peer-reviewed articles, literature reviews, clinical papers & protocols, and cross-cultural research. Special issues dedicated to Advances in topic areas of central interest to contemporary nursing appear twice annually. In 2005, Contemporary Nurse will appear bimonthly (6 issues) in 3 volumes of approximately 300 pages.

Impact factor 0.65

  • Hide impact factor history
     
    Impact factor
  • 5-year impact
    0.88
  • Cited half-life
    5.50
  • Immediacy index
    0.46
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.24
  • Website
    Contemporary Nurse website
  • ISSN
    1037-6178
  • OCLC
    26350877
  • Material type
    Periodical
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • Contemporary nurse: a journal for the Australian nursing profession 12/2014; 7(3):139-140.
  • Contemporary nurse: a journal for the Australian nursing profession 12/2014; 9(1):51-61.
  • Contemporary nurse: a journal for the Australian nursing profession 12/2014; 22(2):333-333.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Taylor's reflective framework has been in place for several years and as far as can be ascertained there has been no review of its utility. The aim of this paper is to explore Taylor's framework in an endeavour to encourage its critical use by nurses in both clinical and academic roles. In the spirit of critical theory, upon which Taylor's framework is based, the use of it as an instrument for reflecting practice will be scrutinised thoroughly.
    Contemporary nurse: a journal for the Australian nursing profession 12/2014; 19(1-2):88-95.
  • Contemporary nurse: a journal for the Australian nursing profession 12/2014; 9(3-4):257-258.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Abstract This study examined the differing perceptions of diabetic patients and their nurses regarding the completion of self-care activities, barriers to participation in diabetes health education, and diabetic patients' educational needs to promote better health care for patients with diabetes in Taiwan. This study employed a cross-sectional survey. The data were collected during 2009. Questionnaires were developed to collect data on a convenience sample of 312 patients with type 2 diabetes and 202 nurses recruited from diabetes clinics in Taiwan. Perceptions of self-care behavior were statistically significantly different between patients and nurses (t = -5.05, P < 0.000). The patients perceived themselves to be more successful at completing self-care tasks whereas nurses perceived patients to be less successful at completing self-care tasks. Nurses perceived patients to experience greater difficulties in diabetes health education (t = 18.36, P < 0.000). Nurses perceived there to be a greater need for health education as compared with patients (t = 9.03, P < 0.000).
    Contemporary nurse: a journal for the Australian nursing profession 12/2014; 46(2):187-196.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Abstract Purpose: Practice nurses are ideally positioned to provide key aspects of self-management education to a large majority of people with diabetes within a primary care setting. However, practice nurses have seldom had comprehensive training in this field and consequently their role may have limitations. A study was designed to determine the diabetes related knowledge levels of practice nurses in a regional/rural setting in Australia. Methods: A cross-sectional study was undertaken using a questionnaire to identify the knowledge of practice nurses. A convenience sample of PNs (N = 52) was drawn from a Division of General Practice in a regional/rural area of NSW. Data was collected using a 14 item knowledge survey from the National Association of Diabetes Centres. Results: Twenty-nine PNs (55%) responded to the survey; primarily the participants were registered nurses (89.6%), only one had completed a postgraduate qualification in diabetes, although 76% had recently completed one or more short courses in diabetes management. Pathophysiology related knowledge was strong (M = 88%) as was knowledge concerning blood glucose monitoring (87%). Less strong was dietary knowledge (79.5%), although one particular question relating to sources of carbohydrate contributed to the lower score. The weakest knowledge area was medication management, with PNs scoring a mean score of only 54%. Conclusion: These findings suggest that PNs have deficits in the knowledge required for DSME and therefore, this must be addressed through targetting continuing professional development.
    Contemporary nurse: a journal for the Australian nursing profession 12/2014; 46(2):234-241.
  • Contemporary nurse: a journal for the Australian nursing profession 12/2014; 6(2):67-68.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Abstract Research shows limited emphasis being placed on oral health by midwives in Australia and the need for further education in this area. The study aim was to pilot a midwifery oral health education programme and knowledge test and identify any flaws in its content and design. Twenty-two midwives from an antenatal ward in South-Western Sydney completed the programme and 12 feedback forms/knowledge tests were returned. Data was analysed using descriptive statistics and content analysis. Feedback data showed all midwives appreciated that the programme was available online and self-paced. Most found the programme extremely informative and following completion were more confident in promoting maternal oral health. The mean correct responses in the knowledge test was 79% (SD = 12.3) which suggests most items were suitable for assessing knowledge improvement. However, in three items midwives had low correct responses. Various aspects that could be improved or clarified were identified and suggestions discussed.
    Contemporary nurse: a journal for the Australian nursing profession 12/2014; 46(2):180-186.
  • Contemporary nurse: a journal for the Australian nursing profession 12/2014; 9(1):51-61.
  • Contemporary nurse: a journal for the Australian nursing profession 12/2014; 4(2):76-79.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Abstract The aim of the study was to develop and test the psychometric properties of an instrument which measures clinical teaching competencies of nursing preceptors. It is necessary to investigate what kinds of teaching competencies are required in modern, more student-centered higher education teaching contexts. Nurses need to possess teaching competence to perform the role of preceptor properly. However, empirical studies exploring teaching competence are rare. Psychometric testing was conducted on a sample of 389 clinical nursing preceptors from three hospitals in 2010. Exploratory factor analysis and reliability testing were conducted on the 53-item Clinical Teaching Competencies Scale. Results indicated that principal axis factoring extraction identified four factors through a promax rotation: Student evaluation, goal setting and individual teaching, teaching strategies, and demonstration of organized knowledge. The Cronbach's α values for the four factors ranged from 0.82-0.87. The Clinical Teaching Competence Inventory was found to have adequate construct validity and internal consistency of reliability for clinical nursing preceptors to assess clinical teaching behaviors in practice settings.
    Contemporary nurse: a journal for the Australian nursing profession 12/2014; 46(2):214-224.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Abstract Trust is integral to nursing; yet little is known about how nurses establish trust when working with patients. This grounded theory study explored nurses' perspectives of how to build trust with a child and family in the context of paediatric acute health care. Seven paediatric acute care nurses were asked what they did when they cared for a child admitted to an acute care ward from emergency department or intensive care unit following a severe traumatic accident. Building trust emerged as the basic social process for an effective working relationship between a nurse and family to promote the rehabilitation of the child. This paper argues that building trust is critical to nurses developing a working relationship with both child and family to promote optimal health, and enables nurses to effectively step out and handover the care of the child to the family.
    Contemporary nurse: a journal for the Australian nursing profession 12/2014; 46(2):161-169.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Abstract In today's healthcare system where technical instruments and test results are used to implement care it is easy to lose the human aspect of nursing. Personal interaction can get lost and nurses sometimes miss humorous attempts made by patients. Humour is a very personal concept, what one person thinks is funny does not necessarily make another person smile, or might even be hurtful. Humour is an important communication tool for patients as it humanises the nurses, creates a bond and opens communication lines. Humour has the potential to change the hospital experience for patients. The aim of this paper is to highlight the importance of humour in the therapeutic relationship between patient and nurse. Semi-structured interviews were held with four registered nurses and narrative inquiry was used to analyse and present the findings because of its ability to capture human interaction and experience.
    Contemporary nurse: a journal for the Australian nursing profession 12/2014; 46(2):197-205.
  • Contemporary nurse: a journal for the Australian nursing profession 12/2014; 7(3):145-147.
  • Contemporary nurse: a journal for the Australian nursing profession 12/2014; 8(3):82-82.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Abstract Nursing students undertake clinical placements in a wide range of clinical areas as part of their preparation for professional practice, offering students the opportunity to learn about the clinical context and the work that nurses do. This descriptive study explores the implicit learnings that occur for students in a community nursing placement and whether they transfer the knowledge they gain in the community setting into practice in other settings. Participants in this research study described implicit learning from a community nursing context which they were able to utilise in their current practice. Three major themes emerged. Firstly, participants recognised that power relationships manifest differently in a community based setting. This manifest in a recognition of patient autonomy and a creative approach to enhancing the patient's power. The second, related theme involved the enabling of self-determination through collaborative decision making between nurse and the person receiving care. The third theme was the development of an understanding of self-management which manifest in appropriate referrals and what the participants considered high quality discharge planning. This recognition of practice beyond technical, rationalist manifestations suggests that students grasped the unarticulated, implicit dimensions of the community nurse role through their experiences in a community nursing placement.
    Contemporary nurse: a journal for the Australian nursing profession 12/2014; 46(2):225-233.
  • Contemporary nurse: a journal for the Australian nursing profession 12/2014; 6(1):22-22.
  • Contemporary nurse: a journal for the Australian nursing profession 12/2014; 9(3-4):256-257.
  • Contemporary nurse: a journal for the Australian nursing profession 12/2014; 34(2):131-3.