Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals (Health Promot J Aust )

Publisher: Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals; Australian Health Promotion Association

Description

  • Impact factor
    0.59
  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
    5.90
  • Immediacy index
    0.20
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.00
  • Website
    Health Promotion Journal of Australia website
  • ISSN
    1036-1073
  • OCLC
    37169607
  • Material type
    Periodical
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • Melanie Pescud, Simone Pettigrew
    Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals 08/2014;
  • Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals 07/2014;
  • Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals 07/2014;
  • Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals 07/2014;
  • Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals 07/2014;
  • Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals 07/2014;
  • Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals 07/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Issue addressed This paper examines recent Australian health reform policies and considers how the primary health care workforce experiences subsequent change and perceives its impact on health promotion practice. Methods Health policy documents were analysed to determine their intended impact on health promotion. Interviews were conducted with 40 respondents from four State funded primary health care services to gain their perceptions of the impact of policy change on health promotion. Results There have been a plethora of policy and strategy documents over the last decade relevant to primary health care and these suggest an intention to strengthen health promotion. However, respondents report that changes to the role and focus of primary health care services have led to fewer opportunities for health promotion. Services are struggling to engage in health promotion activity, while funding and policy directions are prioritised to targeted, individual behaviour change. Conclusion The experience of primary health care workforce respondents in South Australia suggests that, despite policy intentions, health promotion practice is much reduced. Our research suggests that rigorous evaluation of health sector reforms should be undertaken to assess both intended and unintended outcomes on service quality and delivery. So what? Health promoters are experiencing a contradictory policy and practice environment and this research should assist health promoters to advocate for more government accountability in the implementation of policies in order to advance comprehensive primary health care.
    Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: A growing body of evidence demonstrates that regular physical activity promotes health and assists in the prevention of non-communicable diseases but this is presently curtailed by low and unhealthy participation rates in Australia and comparable industrialised countries. Compounding the problem is knowledge that physical inactivity is independently associated with poor health outcomes. Despite physical activity being described as public health's 'best bet' or 'best buy', motivating individuals and groups to adopt and maintain physical activity continues to be a major challenge for health professionals. Global advocacy for prevention efforts must be operationalised through national to local strategies to promote and support physical activity in multiple settings including the home, schools and workplace. The Australian health promotion community has and continues to play a leadership role in physical activity promotion. However, there is an urgent need to continue to promote the importance of physical activity, along with its pivotal role in the prevention of non-communicable diseases, alongside related agendas including healthy diets, tobacco control and environmental sustainability. This commentary overviews the contemporary status of physical activity promotion in Australia and identifies key challenges and opportunities moving forward.
    Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals 04/2014; 25(1):30-4.
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    ABSTRACT: Road traffic injuries are already the leading cause of injury mortality and morbidity globally and by 2030 are predicted to be the fifth leading cause of mortality in the world. Australia has seen a dramatic reduction in road deaths and serious injuries since the 1970s and holds an international reputation for road traffic injury prevention due, in part, to its success in pioneering the multidisciplinary and intersectoral approach needed to address this significant issue and by applying an evidence-led approach to policy development. The paper will discuss Australia's early success in road traffic injury prevention (road safety), particularly the achievements following the implementation of targeted programs that focussed on road user behaviours for which health promotion played a role. The most successful of these programs was the introduction of comprehensive seat belt laws, random breath testing and more recently, strategic speed enforcement programs. Amid an array of significant challenges faced by the transport system in the future, the rapid development in information and communication technologies applied to transport is likely to provide the next generation of road safety benefits. The potential for a semi-autonomous transport system is likely to provide the next significant decline in road fatalities and serious injuries over the next 2 decades and the role of health promotion in relation to raising community engagement and building coalitions to increase uptake of new technologies will be discussed.
    Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals 04/2014; 25(1):4-7.
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    ABSTRACT: Preventing alcohol-related harm presents a range of challenges including those related to political will, competing interests with disproportionate resources, and embedded drinking cultures. On the other hand there are opportunities for health promotion, including clear evidence on both the extent of the problem and evidence-based responses and growing community support for action. Australian researchers continue to contribute substantially to the international evidence base on alcohol, generating evidence for translation into effective programs and producing policy-relevant research on which action and advocacy can be based. Successes in other public health areas also provide useful models for public health approaches to alcohol. Those engaged in health promotion have often been required to do a lot with a little, including communicating health messages on a range of themes, countering industry activities that are contrary to good public health and involvement in policy development. Coalition approaches to alcohol related harm, including links with groups outside health, have recently gained momentum and show much potential. Alcohol issues are now firmly on the agenda of the public and decision-makers, and the alcohol industry has expressed clear concern at current levels of activity. This paper will consider briefly the nature of the challenge; evidence-based approaches; achievements and developments thus far; challenges and obstacles; and the role of health promotion and the health promotion workforce.
    Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals 04/2014; 25(1):8-13.
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    ABSTRACT: Thinking and practising ethically requires reasoning systematically about the right thing to do. Health promotion ethics - a form of applied ethics - includes analysis of health promotion practice and how this can be ethically justified. Existing frameworks can assist in such evaluation. These acknowledge the moral value of delivering benefits. But benefits need to be weighed against burdens, harms or wrongs, and these should be minimised: they include invading privacy, breaking confidentiality, restraining liberty, undermining self-determination or people's own values, or perpetuating injustice. Thinking about the ethics of health promotion also means recognising health promotion as a normative ideal: a vision of the good society. This ideal society values health, sees citizens as active and includes them in decisions that affect them, and makes the state responsible for providing all of its citizens, no matter how advantaged or disadvantaged, with the conditions and resources they need to be healthy. Ethicists writing about health promotion have focused on this relationship between the citizen and the state. Comparing existing frameworks, theories and the expressed values of practitioners themselves, we can see common patterns. All oppose pursuing an instrumental, individualistic, health-at-all-costs vision of health promotion. And all defend the moral significance of just processes: those that engage with citizens in a transparent, inclusive and open way. In recent years, some Australian governments have sought to delegitimise health promotion, defining it as extraneous to the role of the state. Good evidence is not enough to counter this trend, because it is founded in competing visions of a good society. For this reason, the most pressing agenda for health promotion ethics is to engage with communities, in a procedurally just way, about the role and responsibilities of the citizen and the state in promoting and maintaining good health.
    Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals 04/2014; 25(1):19-24.
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    ABSTRACT: Issue addressed Knowledge, attitudes and beliefs about lung cancer among Chinese, Vietnamese and Arabic-speaking communities in Sydney, New South Wales (NSW) are explored. Methods Seven focus groups were completed with a total of 51 participants (smokers and non-smokers) from three culturally and linguistically diverse communities (CALD). Five topics were discussed and translated summaries from focus groups were thematically analysed. Results There were variations in perceived susceptibility to lung cancer between the CALD groups and between smokers and non-smokers. Fatalistic views towards lung cancer were apparent across all three CALD communities. There were low levels of awareness of lung cancer signs and symptoms, with the exception of haemoptysis. Differences in help-seeking behaviour and levels of trust of general practitioners (GP) were apparent. Conclusion Limited awareness of the signs and symptoms of lung cancer, combined with cultural perceptions about cancer, impacted on attitudes towards help-seeking behaviour in these three CALD communities. So what? The prevalence of smoking among Chinese men, Vietnamese men and Arabic-speaking communities in NSW puts them at increased risk of lung cancer. Health promotion initiatives for lung cancer should be tailored for CALD communities and could focus on increasing knowledge of key symptoms, awareness that ex-smokers are at risk and awareness of the diagnostic pathway including the importance of avoiding delays in help-seeking.
    Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals 04/2014; 25(1):46-51.
  • Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals 04/2014; 25(1):67-8.
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    ABSTRACT: Over the last 15 years, a growing body of Australian and international evidence has demonstrated that urban design attributes are associated with a range of health outcomes. For example, the location of employment, shops and services, provision of public and active transport infrastructure and access to open space and recreational opportunities are associated with chronic disease risk factors such as physical activity levels, access to healthy food, social connectedness, and air quality. Despite the growing knowledge base, this evidence is not being consistently translated into urban planning policy and practice in Australia. Low-density neighbourhoods with poor access to public transport, shops and services continue to be developed at a rapid rate in the sprawling outer suburbs of Australian cities. This paper provides an overview of the evidence of the association between the built environment and chronic diseases, highlighting progress and future challenges for health promotion. It argues that health promotion practitioners and researchers need to more closely engage with urban planning practitioners, policymakers and researchers to encourage the creation of healthy urban environments through integrated transport, land use and infrastructure planning. There is also a need for innovative research to evaluate the effectiveness of policy options. This would help evidence to be more effectively translated into policy and practice, making Australia a leader in planning healthy communities.
    Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals 04/2014; 25(1):14-8.
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    ABSTRACT: Issue addressed There has been a growing national and global focus on the need to address social determinants of health to better achieve equitable health outcomes. In Australia, this focus is now being embedded into state, territory and Commonwealth government health policies. In this paper I use the National Primary Health Care Strategic Framework as a case study to examine the way in which 'health equity' and other related terms have been framed within a current national health policy context. Discussion Using a critically reflective approach, I argue that primary health care and health promotion professionals need to capitalise on the inclusion of terms such as 'action on social determinants of health', 'health equity' and 'reducing inequity' through emerging national health policies, such as the National Primary Health Care Strategic Framework. Yet, there is also a need to proceed with caution. The way in which these terms are framed appears to deviate from the principles, values and ideologies on which they are historically based. The implications for contemporary health promotion practice in Australia are discussed. Conclusions Primary health care and health promotion professionals working in both policy and practice contexts are encouraged to engage in critical reflective practice when interpreting and considering the implementation requirements of national health policies that incorporate a health equity focus. So what? To build health equity in Australia, primary health care and health promotion professionals will be required to engage in the skilful reframing of current primary health care policy discourses relating to health equity during health promotion planning, implementation and evaluation processes.
    Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals 04/2014; 25(1):42-5.
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    ABSTRACT: Issue addressed School inclusion and academic attainment are key social determinants of health. Students who have been suspended from school are more likely to disengage from school and consequently not receive the health promoting benefits of social inclusion and academic achievement. This study sought to explore the experiences of students who have been previously suspended (i.e., had experienced school exclusion). Methods Seventy-four previously suspended adolescents from five schools in the state of Victoria, Australia, completed a written questionnaire. Students reported their understanding of the process of being suspended; what they did and with whom they spent the day/s of suspension; and their perceptions of their return to school post-suspension. Results Whilst suspended, a minority of suspended students received adult supervision and most suspended students participated in benign leisure activities. Upon return to school, students reported diminished teacher assistance and found that suspension did not help resolve the underlying issues that lead to the suspension. Conclusions Removal of a student displaying problem behaviours from the classroom may provide temporary relief to the school community but suspended students report minimal benefits from suspension. Suspension removes the potential prosocial normative influences of school and provides an opportunity to establish antisocial peer networks. Suspended students appear to perceive a stigma upon their return to school, further diminishing an already tenuous school relationship. So what? School suspension exposes disadvantaged students to several negative social determinants of health. Students displaying problem behaviours would benefit from interventions that maintain the student’s relationship with school. Should suspension be necessary schools could assist by ensuring that suspended students receive appropriate adult supervision and a formal reintegration to school to promote social inclusion and academic attainment, two recognised key determinants of health.
    Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals 03/2014;
  • Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals 03/2014;
  • Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals 03/2014;

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