Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals (Health Promot J Aust )

Publisher: Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals; Australian Health Promotion Association

Description

  • Impact factor
    0.59
  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
    5.90
  • Immediacy index
    0.20
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.00
  • Website
    Health Promotion Journal of Australia website
  • ISSN
    1036-1073
  • OCLC
    37169607
  • Material type
    Periodical
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals 03/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Issue addressed School inclusion and academic attainment are key social determinants of health. Students who have been suspended from school are more likely to disengage from school and consequently not receive the health promoting benefits of social inclusion and academic achievement. This study sought to explore the experiences of students who have been previously suspended (i.e., had experienced school exclusion). Methods Seventy-four previously suspended adolescents from five schools in the state of Victoria, Australia, completed a written questionnaire. Students reported their understanding of the process of being suspended; what they did and with whom they spent the day/s of suspension; and their perceptions of their return to school post-suspension. Results Whilst suspended, a minority of suspended students received adult supervision and most suspended students participated in benign leisure activities. Upon return to school, students reported diminished teacher assistance and found that suspension did not help resolve the underlying issues that lead to the suspension. Conclusions Removal of a student displaying problem behaviours from the classroom may provide temporary relief to the school community but suspended students report minimal benefits from suspension. Suspension removes the potential prosocial normative influences of school and provides an opportunity to establish antisocial peer networks. Suspended students appear to perceive a stigma upon their return to school, further diminishing an already tenuous school relationship. So what? School suspension exposes disadvantaged students to several negative social determinants of health. Students displaying problem behaviours would benefit from interventions that maintain the student’s relationship with school. Should suspension be necessary schools could assist by ensuring that suspended students receive appropriate adult supervision and a formal reintegration to school to promote social inclusion and academic attainment, two recognised key determinants of health.
    Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals 03/2014;
  • Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals 03/2014;
  • Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals 03/2014;
  • Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals 12/2013;
  • Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals 12/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: Issue addressed The aim of this evaluation was to explore the quality, barriers, enablers and outcomes of a retail fresh fruit and vegetable initiative in rural communities identified to have poor geographic access to healthy food. Methods A qualitative evaluation using in-depth interviews was conducted with rural store retailers across Victoria involved in the implementation of a retail fruit and vegetable initiative. Data were analysed using a thematic approach. Results Six of the 13 store retailers that were engaged in the initiative identified a range of qualities, barriers, enablers and outcomes. They reported that effective communication is essential for engaging retailers and sustaining participation. The choice and use of retail incentives may influence the community's purchase of fruit and vegetables. The community's attitude to fruit and vegetables, the staff's ability to promote produce and the capacity of the store to stock and sell fresh fruit and vegetables influenced perceived success. Barriers included difficulties receiving a regular supply of fresh fruit and vegetables, time constraints and storage facilities. Conclusions This qualitative evaluation of a retail fruit and vegetable initiative found that effective leadership and communication from project workers, a range of retail incentives and the capacity of the store to promote, stock and sell fresh fruit and vegetables influenced perceived success. So what? Fruit and vegetable retail initiatives in small rural community stores may have a role in supporting consumption of fruit and vegetables.
    Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals 12/2013; 24(3):192-8.
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    ABSTRACT: Issue addressed Although increases in cycling in Brisbane are encouraging, bicycle mode share to work (the proportion of people travelling to work by bicycle) in the state of Queensland remains low. The aim of this qualitative study was to draw upon the lived experiences of Queensland cyclists to understand the main motivators for utility cycling (cycling as a means to get to and from places) and compare motivators between utility cyclists (those who cycle for utility as well as for recreation) and non-utility cyclists (those who cycle only for recreation). Methods For an online survey, members of a bicycle group (831 utility cyclists and 931 non-utility cyclists, aged 18-90 years) were asked to describe, unprompted, what would motivate them to engage in utility cycling (more often). Responses were coded into themes within four levels of an ecological model. Results Within an ecological model, built environment influences on motivation were grouped according to whether they related to appeal (safety), convenience (accessibility) or attractiveness (more amenities) and included adequate infrastructure for short trips, bikeway connectivity, end-of-trip facilities at public locations and easy and safe bicycle access to destinations outside of cities. A key social-cultural influence related to improved interactions among different road users. Conclusions The built and social-cultural environments need to be more supportive of utility cycling before even current utility and non-utility cyclists will be motivated to engage (more often) in utility cycling. So what? Additional government strategies and more and better infrastructure that support utility cycling beyond commuter cycling may encourage a utility cycling culture.
    Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals 12/2013; 24(3):227-33.
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    ABSTRACT: Issues addressed Physical activity recommendations for adults worldwide advise participation in moderate-intensity physical activity, such as walking, on most days of the week. Younger adults report the lowest prevalence of walking. This mixed-methods study explores the salience of Australia's activity recommendations around moderate-intensity physical activity, particularly walking, for young Australian adults. Methods Semistructured interviews were conducted with 24 young Australians aged 17-25 years. During interviews, Australia's physical activity recommendations for adults were explained to participants, highlighting the inclusion of moderate-intensity physical activity such as walking. Participants were asked to comment on the recommendations and walking for physical activity and exercise. Data from interviews underwent an iterative thematic form of analysis. Participants also completed the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) and were asked to complete a pedometer diary. Results No participant was classified as sedentary; twenty three participants reported walking for transport and nine for leisure (IPAQ). During interviews, the majority of participants (n=20) did not identify walking as physical activity or exercise. Participants focussed on the cardiorespiratory (fitness) benefits associated with physical activity and believed walking was of insufficient intensity to achieve these benefits at their age. Conclusions Walking was considered an everyday activity and of insufficient intensity to achieve any health or fitness benefits. So what? The belief that only vigorous physical activity conveys any fitness benefits may act as a barrier to participation in moderate-intensity physical activity such as walking, particularly among sedentary young people.
    Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals 12/2013; 24(3):199-205.
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    ABSTRACT: Background Adolescence and young adulthood is a time of risky health behaviour initiation and experimentation. Smoking, risky drinking, poor nutrition and physical activity, and a lack of sun protection behaviour, often become established in early adulthood. Levels of health risk behaviours occurring amongst tertiary education and training students and their preferences for types of on-campus health promotion programs were examined. Method A cross-sectional pen-and-paper classroom survey was conducted at one Sydney-based TAFE New South Wales Institute campus in May 2010. The survey assessed demographics, smoking, alcohol use, sun protection, nutrition, physical activity and health promotion program preferences. Results Two hundred and twenty-four students participated (97% consent); the majority were aged 16-24 years (59%) and female (51%). Current smoking (35%), risky drinking (49%) and inadequate physical activity (88%) rates were high. Adequate vegetable intake (3.6%) and sun protection behaviours (5.4%) were low and 33% of students were overweight or obese. Popular health promotion programs included food and activity subsidies, practical skills classes and social outings. Conclusion Participation in health risk behaviours among this sample was high. The setting of tertiary education and workplace training represents an opportunity for early intervention into risky health behaviours among young people. So what? This study is the first to provide information on the prevalence of health risk behaviours and preferences for types of health promoting programs among students of an Australian community college. The results show that young adults regularly participate in multiple health risk behaviours, such as smoking, drinking, poor nutrition, physical activity and lack of sun protection.
    Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals 12/2013; 24(3):185-91.
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    ABSTRACT: Issue addressed Physical activity affects the immune system, which in turn may modify the risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). The effect of sitting on CIN is unknown. This study investigated the relationship between sitting time, physical activity and the risk of CIN. Methods Community-dwelling adult women within metropolitan Perth, Western Australia, who had had a Papanicolaou (Pap) smear test at any of five clinics and medical centres, were approached by their general practitioners. In total, 348 women were recruited and interviewed for information on sitting time, physical activity level and lifetime physical activity exposure using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) - short form. Associations of exposure variables with CIN risk were assessed by unconditional logistic regression analyses. Results The prevalence of abnormal Pap smear status indicating CIN was found to be 15.8%. Women with prolonged sitting duration (≥ 42h per week) had significantly increased risk of CIN (adjusted OR 3.49, 95% CI 1.12-10.88) than women who sat less than 24.5h per week. Although the effect of total physical activity level was non-significant (P=0.408), being always involved in physical activity during the entire life appeared to be inversely associated with the CIN risk (P=0.036). Conclusions Prolonged sitting time was significantly associated with increased risk of abnormal Pap smear status indicating CIN. So what? This preliminary investigation highlights a new prospect for health-promotion intervention to reduce the risk of CIN. Health practitioners should encourage women to reduce their sitting time and maintain physically active throughout their life course.
    Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals 12/2013; 24(3):219-23.
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    ABSTRACT: Issue addressed This paper aims to explore the presence and role of edible gardens in Aotearoa/New Zealand Early Childhood Education Services (ECES). Methods Participant ECES providers were identified from the Ministry of Education database of Early Childhood Education Services (March 2009). These include Education and Care and Casual Education and Care, Kindergarten, Home-based Education and Care services, Playcentres, Te Kōhanga Reo. A structured, self-administered questionnaire was sent to the Principal or Head Teacher of the service Results Of the 211 ECES that responded (55% response rate), 71% had edible gardens, incorporating vegetables, berry fruit, tree fruit, edible flowers and nut trees. Garden activities were linked with teaching across all strands of the New Zealand early childhood curriculum. In addition, 34% provided guidance on using garden produce and 30% linked the garden with messages on fruit and vegetable consumption. Most gardens were established recently (past 2 years) and relied on financial and non-financial support from parents, teachers and community organisations. Barriers included a lack of funding, space, time and staff support. Conclusions/Implications Study findings suggest that gardens are already being used as a versatile teaching tool in many ECES settings. Most gardens are new, with a need to support the sustainability and workforce development among teachers and parents in order to be able to maintain these resources for future generations. So what? Given the inherent links between gardening and healthy food and exercise, there seem to be extensive opportunities for health promotion aligned with the edible garden movement.
    Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals 12/2013; 24(3):214-8.
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    ABSTRACT: Issue addressed Centre-based childcare services represent a promising setting to target the prevention of excessive weight gain in preschool-aged children. Staff training is a key component of multi-strategy interventions to improve implementation of effective physical activity and nutrition promoting practices for obesity prevention in childcare services. This randomised controlled trial aimed to examine whether an active telephone-based strategy to invite childcare-service staff to attend a training workshop was effective in increasing the proportion of services with staff attending training, compared with a passive strategy. Methods Services were randomised to an active telephone-based or a passive-recruitment strategy. Those in the active arm received an email invitation and one to three follow-up phone calls, whereas services in the passive arm were informed of the availability of training only via newsletters. The proportion of services with staff attending the training workshop was compared between the two arms. Results One hundred and twenty-eight services were included in this study. A significantly larger proportion (52%) of services in the active arm compared with those in the passive-strategy arm (3.1%) attended training (d.f.=1, χ2=34.3; P<0.001). Conclusions An active, telephone-based recruitment strategy significantly increased the proportion of childcare services with staff attending training. Further strategies to improve staff attendance at training need to be identified and implemented. So what? Active-recruitment strategies including follow-up telephone calls should be utilised to invite staff to participate in training, in order to maximise the use of training as an implementation strategy for obesity prevention in childcare services.
    Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals 12/2013; 24(3):224-6.
  • Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals 10/2013; 24(2):156-7.
  • Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals 10/2013; 24(2):159.
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    ABSTRACT: Issues addressed The International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) was developed as a global standard questionnaire to monitor physical activity across diverse populations. In Vietnam, the IPAQ-Short Form (SF) has only been tested for reliability and validity among adolescents. The present study determined test-retest reliability and criterion validity of the IPAQ-SF for older Vietnamese adults aged 60-75 years. Methods In all, 197 participants were recruited from the community. Subjects were requested to wear a pedometer, record daily steps and list all physical activities in a log-book for 7 consecutive days. Those who completed the requirements were interviewed using the IPAQ-SF (IPAQ1). A repeated interview was arranged 3 days later (IPAQ2). Results The final sample consisted of 150 participants (75 men, 75 women) with mean (± s.d.) age of 66.8±5.1 years. The intraclass correlation coefficients between IPAQ1 and IPAQ2 exceeded 0.80 for all physical activity domains and sitting, indicating good reliability. However, fair to weak validity was evident between IPAQ1 measures and activity log and pedometer readings, with Spearman correlations of 0.46 and 0.20, respectively. Conclusions The Vietnamese translated version of IPAQ-SF appears to be a reliable and reasonably valid instrument to assess and monitor habitual physical activity for older adults in Vietnam. So what? The IPAQ-SF could provide useful physical activity data to evaluate the effectiveness of health promotion intervention programs and for international comparison purposes.
    Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals 10/2013; 24(2):126-31.

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