Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals (Health Promot J Aust )

Publisher: Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals; Australian Health Promotion Association

Description

  • Impact factor
    0.59
  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
    5.90
  • Immediacy index
    0.20
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.00
  • Website
    Health Promotion Journal of Australia website
  • ISSN
    1036-1073
  • OCLC
    37169607
  • Material type
    Periodical
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals 09/2014;
  • Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals 09/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The paper is available on open access http://www.publish.csiro.au/paper/HE14044.htm Issue addressed: Food insecurity in remote Western Australian (WA) Indigenous communities. This study explored remote community store managers’ views on issues related to improving food security in order to inform health policy. Method: A census of all remote WA Indigenous community store managers was conducted in 2010. Telephone interviews sought managers’ perceptions of community food insecurity, problems with their store, and potential policy options for improving the supply, accessibility, affordability and consumption of nutritious foods. Descriptive analyses were conducted using SPSS for Windows version 17.0. Results: Managers stated that freight costs and irregular deliveries contributed to high prices and a limited range of foods. Poor store infrastructure, compromised cold chain logistics, and commonly occurring power outages affected food quality. Half of the managers said there was hunger in their community because people did not have enough money to buy food. The role of nutritionists beyond a clinical and educational role was not understood. Conclusions: Food security interventions in remote communities need to take into consideration issues such as freight costs, transport and low demand for nutritious foods. Store managers provide important local knowledge regarding the development and implementation of food security interventions. So what?: Agencies acting to address the issue of food insecurity in remote WA Indigenous communities should heed the advice of community store managers that high food prices, poor quality and limited availability are mainly due to transport inefficiencies and freight costs. Improving healthy food affordability in communities where high unemployment and low household income abound is fundamental to improving food security, yet presents a significant challenge.
    Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Issue addressed Since 2005, all states and territories across Australia have progressively introduced policy guidelines to promote nutritious food sales in school canteens. This study aimed to assess the compliance of school canteens with their state or territory canteen guidelines. Methods School canteen menus from a convenience sample of online government school websites were assessed for compliance with guidelines for the inclusion of foods meeting the criteria for 'red' ('not recommended' or 'only occasional - no more than twice per term'), 'amber' ('select carefully') and 'green' ('always on the menu', 'everyday', 'fill the menu' or 'plenty'). The costs of a salad and a regular pie were also collected where present. Results A total of 263 school menus were sourced and assessed (4% of government schools). Western Australia was the most compliant, with 62% of menus adhering to the state guidelines; compliance in other jurisdictions ranged from 5-35%. Compared with primary schools, a higher proportion of secondary schools offered 'red' items on the menu (P<0.05). The mean cost of a regular pie (A$3.17±0.51) was significantly cheaper than the cost of a salad (A$4.25±0.82) (P<0.001). A range of discretionary food items were present on a large proportion of menus. Conclusion This study found that the majority of school canteens were not complying with relevant state or territory guidelines, particularly those schools in which no monitoring or enforcement of the guidelines was conducted. So what? Monitoring and enforcement by those responsible for the policy, together with efforts to build the capacity for schools and manufacturers to improve the food supply, may increase compliance.
    Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals 09/2014; 25(2):110-5.
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    ABSTRACT: Issue addressed: The Western Australian (WA) Public Health Bill will replace the antiquated Health Act 1911. One of the proposed clauses of the Bill requires all WA local governments to develop a Public Health Plan. The Bill states that Public Health Plans should be based on evidence from all levels, including national and statewide priorities, community needs, local statistical evidence, and stakeholder data. Methods: This exploratory study, which targeted 533 WA local government officers, aimed to identify the sources of evidence used to generate the list of public health risks to be included in local government Public Health Plans. Results: The top four sources identified for informing local policy were: observation of the consequences of the risks in the local community (24.5%), statewide evidence (17.6%), local evidence (17.6%) and coverage in local media (16.2%). Conclusions: This study confirms that both hard and soft data are used to inform policy decisions at the local level. Therefore, the challenge that this study has highlighted is in the definition or constitution of evidence. So what?: Evidence is critical to the process of sound policy development. This study highlights issues associated with what actually constitutes evidence in the policy development process at the local government level. With the exception of those who work in an extremely narrow field, it is difficult for local government officers, whose role includes policymaking, to read the vast amount of information that has been published in their area of expertise. For those who are committed to the notion of evidence-based policymaking, as advocated within the WA Public Health Bill, this presents a considerable challenge.
    Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Issue addressed Schools are recognised as important settings for promoting student and community wellbeing through education, policies and the modelling of behaviour. Recently, there has been controversy regarding the promotion and use of alcohol by adults at school events. The aim of this study was to examine the policy approach of all Australian jurisdictions to the possession and use of alcohol, by adults, at government school events when students are present. Methods A desktop review of Australian governments' alcohol in schools policy/guidelines documents was undertaken. Results Eighteen documents across eight jurisdictions were retrieved. There were inconsistencies between jurisdictions and lack of policy clarity regarding the promotion and/or use of alcohol by adults at events organised by schools for recreation, celebration and fundraising purposes. Discussion and conclusions Clarity is needed about the role of alcohol in Australian schools, particularly in relation to its use of alcohol when there is a duty of care to children. The possession and/or use of alcohol by adults at school events may contribute to the pervasive role of drinking in Australian social life. So what? Clear and evidence-based guidelines are needed to inform school policies across all jurisdictions as to whether, when and under which circumstances it is appropriate for schools to promote and/or supply alcohol. This would also strengthen the ability of school principals and communities to make appropriate evidence-based decisions that focus on the interests of children.
    Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals 09/2014; 25(2):125-8.
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    ABSTRACT: Issue addressed This paper explored the first-time use of Twitter by the Australian Health Promotion Association (AHPA) at its 2013 National Health Promotion Conference. Methods The @AHPA_AU Twitter account and #AHPA2013 hashtag were established and included in the conference program. Attendees were encouraged throughout the conference to use it. A total of 748 tweets were captured under the hashtag #AHPA2013 in chronological order from 16-19 June 2013. Tweets with photos and more than one hashtag were recorded. A thematic analysis of tweets was conducted. Results Thirteen broad themes were identified, with each of the 748 tweets allocated to one of the themes. Tweets about keynote sessions made up 38% of all tweets, followed by 14% for concurrent sessions. A photo was included in 11% of tweets, and 25% were sent to more than one hashtag. There were 96 tweeters; 75% of them posted five or less tweets and ~9%, including a professional blogger, posted greater than 20 tweets. At the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander pre-conference workshop there was a relatively high level of Twitter engagement. Conclusion Twitter could potentially be useful for promoting conference content and activities, but what it adds in value to a health promotion conference cannot be determined by this study. So what? This paper highlights the engagement of tweeters with conference content and activities and suggests that tweeting benefited from the engagement of a professional health blogger.
    Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals 09/2014; 25(2):143-6.
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    ABSTRACT: Issue addressed This paper examines recent Australian health reform policies and considers how the primary health care workforce experiences subsequent change and perceives its impact on health promotion practice. Methods Health policy documents were analysed to determine their intended impact on health promotion. Interviews were conducted with 40 respondents from four State funded primary health care services to gain their perceptions of the impact of policy change on health promotion. Results There have been a plethora of policy and strategy documents over the last decade relevant to primary health care and these suggest an intention to strengthen health promotion. However, respondents report that changes to the role and focus of primary health care services have led to fewer opportunities for health promotion. Services are struggling to engage in health promotion activity, while funding and policy directions are prioritised to targeted, individual behaviour change. Conclusion The experience of primary health care workforce respondents in South Australia suggests that, despite policy intentions, health promotion practice is much reduced. Our research suggests that rigorous evaluation of health sector reforms should be undertaken to assess both intended and unintended outcomes on service quality and delivery. So what? Health promoters are experiencing a contradictory policy and practice environment and this research should assist health promoters to advocate for more government accountability in the implementation of policies in order to advance comprehensive primary health care.
    Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals 08/2014;
  • Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals 08/2014;
  • Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals 07/2014;
  • Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals 07/2014;
  • Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals 07/2014;
  • Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals 07/2014;
  • Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals 07/2014;
  • Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: A growing body of evidence demonstrates that regular physical activity promotes health and assists in the prevention of non-communicable diseases but this is presently curtailed by low and unhealthy participation rates in Australia and comparable industrialised countries. Compounding the problem is knowledge that physical inactivity is independently associated with poor health outcomes. Despite physical activity being described as public health's 'best bet' or 'best buy', motivating individuals and groups to adopt and maintain physical activity continues to be a major challenge for health professionals. Global advocacy for prevention efforts must be operationalised through national to local strategies to promote and support physical activity in multiple settings including the home, schools and workplace. The Australian health promotion community has and continues to play a leadership role in physical activity promotion. However, there is an urgent need to continue to promote the importance of physical activity, along with its pivotal role in the prevention of non-communicable diseases, alongside related agendas including healthy diets, tobacco control and environmental sustainability. This commentary overviews the contemporary status of physical activity promotion in Australia and identifies key challenges and opportunities moving forward.
    Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals 04/2014; 25(1):30-4.
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    ABSTRACT: Preventing alcohol-related harm presents a range of challenges including those related to political will, competing interests with disproportionate resources, and embedded drinking cultures. On the other hand there are opportunities for health promotion, including clear evidence on both the extent of the problem and evidence-based responses and growing community support for action. Australian researchers continue to contribute substantially to the international evidence base on alcohol, generating evidence for translation into effective programs and producing policy-relevant research on which action and advocacy can be based. Successes in other public health areas also provide useful models for public health approaches to alcohol. Those engaged in health promotion have often been required to do a lot with a little, including communicating health messages on a range of themes, countering industry activities that are contrary to good public health and involvement in policy development. Coalition approaches to alcohol related harm, including links with groups outside health, have recently gained momentum and show much potential. Alcohol issues are now firmly on the agenda of the public and decision-makers, and the alcohol industry has expressed clear concern at current levels of activity. This paper will consider briefly the nature of the challenge; evidence-based approaches; achievements and developments thus far; challenges and obstacles; and the role of health promotion and the health promotion workforce.
    Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals 04/2014; 25(1):8-13.
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    ABSTRACT: Thinking and practising ethically requires reasoning systematically about the right thing to do. Health promotion ethics - a form of applied ethics - includes analysis of health promotion practice and how this can be ethically justified. Existing frameworks can assist in such evaluation. These acknowledge the moral value of delivering benefits. But benefits need to be weighed against burdens, harms or wrongs, and these should be minimised: they include invading privacy, breaking confidentiality, restraining liberty, undermining self-determination or people's own values, or perpetuating injustice. Thinking about the ethics of health promotion also means recognising health promotion as a normative ideal: a vision of the good society. This ideal society values health, sees citizens as active and includes them in decisions that affect them, and makes the state responsible for providing all of its citizens, no matter how advantaged or disadvantaged, with the conditions and resources they need to be healthy. Ethicists writing about health promotion have focused on this relationship between the citizen and the state. Comparing existing frameworks, theories and the expressed values of practitioners themselves, we can see common patterns. All oppose pursuing an instrumental, individualistic, health-at-all-costs vision of health promotion. And all defend the moral significance of just processes: those that engage with citizens in a transparent, inclusive and open way. In recent years, some Australian governments have sought to delegitimise health promotion, defining it as extraneous to the role of the state. Good evidence is not enough to counter this trend, because it is founded in competing visions of a good society. For this reason, the most pressing agenda for health promotion ethics is to engage with communities, in a procedurally just way, about the role and responsibilities of the citizen and the state in promoting and maintaining good health.
    Health promotion journal of Australia: official journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals 04/2014; 25(1):19-24.