World hospitals and health services: the official journal of the International Hospital Federation (World Hosp Health Serv )

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  • ISSN
    1029-0540

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Productivity is NOT the same as quality. Productivity is about the value-add we bring to work, to each job, to each day. To create a productive hospital environment, it is so much more than buying the right equipment or hiring the right mix of people. Productivity comes from investing in our people and giving them the tools and authority to do their jobs effectively. Adding more "quality programmes" can actually kill productivity by taking people away from their core jobs. Adding a tick-list in the operating theatre can cut mortality rates in half by eliminating the smallest of mistakes. This article is a guide to help you focus on the key elements of productivity and not to get distracted by the hype and confusion from media. Its bottom-line focus and "how-to" tools and ideas make it useful and practical.
    World hospitals and health services: the official journal of the International Hospital Federation 01/2014; 50(1):16-8.
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    ABSTRACT: Teamwork and communication failures are leading causes of patient safety incidents in health care. Though health care providers must work in teams, they are not well-trained in teamwork and communication skills. Health care faces the problems of differences in communication styles, communication failures and poor teamwork. There is enough evidence in the literature to show that communication failure is detrimental to patient safety. It is estimated that 80% of serious medical errors worldwide take place because of miscommunication between medical providers. NUH recognizes that effective communication and teamwork are essential in the delivery of high quality safe patient care, especially in a complex organization. NUH is a good example, where there is a rich mix of nationalities and races, in staff and in patients, and there is a rapidly expanding care environment. NUH had to overcome these challenges by adopting a multi-pronged approach. The trials and tribulations of NUH in this journey were worthwhile as the patient safety climate survey scores improved over the years.
    World hospitals and health services: the official journal of the International Hospital Federation 01/2014; 50(1):19-22.
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    ABSTRACT: Quality in health care is important as it is directly linked with patient safety. Quality as we know is driven either by regulation or by market demand. Regulation in most developing countries has not been effective, as there is shortage of health care providers and governments have to be flexible. In such circumstances, quality has taken a back seat. Accreditation symbolizes the framework for quality governance of a hospital and is based on optimum standards. Not only is India establishing numerous state of the art hospitals, but they are also experiencing an increase in demand for quality as well as medical tourism. India launched its own accreditation system in 2006, conforming to standards accredited by ISQua. This article shows the journey to accreditation in India and describes the problems encountered by hospitals as well as the benefits it has generated for the industry and patients.
    World hospitals and health services: the official journal of the International Hospital Federation 01/2014; 50(1):9-12.
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    ABSTRACT: It is recognized that health services are facing increasing cost pressures amid a climate of increasing demand and increasing expectations from patients and families. The ability to innovate is important for the future success of all health care organizations. By malting some simple but profound changes in behaviours and processes as illustrated across seven dimensions, leaders can have great impact on the culture for innovation. This in turn can support the transformation of health services through increased innovation.
    World hospitals and health services: the official journal of the International Hospital Federation 01/2014; 50(1):4-6.
  • World hospitals and health services: the official journal of the International Hospital Federation 01/2014; 50(1):3.
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    ABSTRACT: The people who work in health care organizations are committed to providing the best care possible to their patients. In the contemporary health care environment this is a very difficult commitment to keep. Health care has never been more complicated or demanding of the people who work in the industry. This article describes two different but complimentary methods for improving the quality and safety of health care. Accreditation provides a foundation for creating systems of care across many types of health care organizations. High reliability inspires people and organizations to strive for the highest levels of performance. Together, these methods give people working in health care an opportunity to fulfil their commitment to their patients.
    World hospitals and health services: the official journal of the International Hospital Federation 01/2014; 50(1):13-5.
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    ABSTRACT: Health services are one of the most important criteria for making a country function. Turkey has mobilized all of its resources to provide high-quality, easily accessible and patient-friendly services for its population. To achieve this aim, the Turkish health care system has been undergoing a significant transformation through its Health Transformation Programme begun in 2005. The reforms focus on the introduction of a general health insurance system, changing hospital health services, improvements in hospital management and transformational leadership skills. Firstly, all state-run hospitals in the country were merged under the same umbrella, giving millions of people covered by the national security agency access to all of these hospitals. Secondly, all drugs and medical equipment used by patients were made free of charge. Thanks to these developments, hospitals were modernized, and this modernization process in the health sector is still continuing swiftly. On the other hand, for Turkish hospitals to survive, they need to modernize further and become closer to European models, and produce new leaders with new paradigms. In this new and changing health system, hospital leaders and executive officers should be visionaries and strategists advising when to change direction. Following this doctrine, most Turkish hospitals are now run by two top executives: the hospital manager and the chief executive officer who is in charge of business functions. These executives should clearly be the leaders of high-quality, health care organizations.
    World hospitals and health services: the official journal of the International Hospital Federation 01/2014; 50(1):7-8.
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    ABSTRACT: By 2020, the population of Ulaanbaatar will reach 1,522,400 inhabitants. In addition, estimates show that relative to 2010, there will be 13.1% more outpatient registrations and 11.6% more inpatients by 2020. This study, conducted by descriptive design based on demographic and morbidity data, analyzes whether current health care facilities meet the demands and needs of the Ulaanbaatar population. It also assesses health care needs and accessibilty in Ulaanbaatar by 2020. Both data analysis and qualitative interviews with different sub-groups of the population reveal the neccesity to both reorganize primary level health care facilities and adjust resources in accordance with changing morbidity patterns.
    World hospitals and health services: the official journal of the International Hospital Federation 01/2014; 50(1):27-30.
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    ABSTRACT: This study was conducted to explore the entire spectrum of initiatives that have evolved globally over time in health care delivery mechanisms. The quality improvement initiatives that have been reviewed were undertaken at the department of radiology at a tertiary care teaching hospital in the developing world. This article reveals that conducting only clinical audits is not enough to bring about improvements in the health care delivery processes. It also illustrates examples of other initiatives that combine to enable sustainable, safe and high quality health care services for the patients whom we serve.
    World hospitals and health services: the official journal of the International Hospital Federation 01/2014; 50(1):23-6.
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    ABSTRACT: In Norway, as in most countries, the demands placed on hospitals to reduce costs and improve the quality of services are intense. Although many say that improving quality reduces costs, few can prove it. Futhermore, how many people can show that improving quality improves patient satisfaction. Diakonhjemmet hospital in Norway has designed and implemented a hospital management system based on lean principles and the PDCA (Plan-Do-Check-Act) quality circle introduced by WE Deming (Deming 2000). The results are quite impressive with improvements in quality and patient satisfaction. The hospital also runs at a profit.
    World hospitals and health services: the official journal of the International Hospital Federation 01/2013; 49(4):4-7.
  • World hospitals and health services: the official journal of the International Hospital Federation 01/2013; 49(4):3.
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    ABSTRACT: Junior doctors of today are being issued with an Apple iPad when they start their education. They will be the senior consultants of the future. The junior doctors rate of adoption in new technology is far greater than before as they have been born in a digital age. This is fortunate, because every country with sophisticated health care is exposed to greater demands on the service either through increased numbers of elderly patients or more sophisticated treatments. Doctors need to be more mobile to flexibly treat their patients. They need to be able to access patient details while they are on the move. They need to be part of the innovation revolution. They are born in the digital world and need to be central to the design of clinical applications and technology in health care--they are "new age app doctors."
    World hospitals and health services: the official journal of the International Hospital Federation 01/2013; 49(3):22-4.
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    ABSTRACT: Newcomers to the United Arab Emirates (UAE) health care system often enquire about the way in which UAE health services are financed particularly when funding issues affect eligibility for treatment. The UAE ranks alongside many western counties on measures of life expectancy and child mortality but because of the unique population structure spends less of its national income on health. In the past as a wealthy country the UAE had no difficulty ensuring universal access to a comprehensive range of services but the health needs of the UAE population are becoming more complex and like many countries the UAE health system is facing the twin challenges of quality and cost. To meet these challenges new models of health care financing are being introduced. In this brief article we will describe the evolution of UAE health financing, its current state and likely future developments.
    World hospitals and health services: the official journal of the International Hospital Federation 01/2013; 49(2):33-9.
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    ABSTRACT: Patient satisfaction surveys help a great deal in identifying ways of improving a hospital's services. Ultimately, that translates into better care and happier patients. Moreover, it shows the staff and the community that the hospital is serious about quality and is looking for ways to improve. This article describes how the Voice of the Customer (VOC) Survey can be used as a tool for improving services. Regular monitoring of VOC scores is essential for minimizing the gaps between service delivery and patient expectations. The present study showcases the various initiatives undertaken to improve the VOC scores from an original 4.40 to 4.77 (on a 5 point scale) at the hospital under study.
    World hospitals and health services: the official journal of the International Hospital Federation 01/2013; 49(2):22-5.
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    ABSTRACT: In the early 2000s, the United Arab Emirates (UAE) had good levels of health and its health system was ranked twenty-seventh in the world by the World Health Organization. Since that time, to further improve the situation and to address cost and quality challenges, the UAE has embarked on an ambitious programme of health system reform. These reforms have focused on the introduction of private health insurance and encouraging the growth of private health provision. In these areas there have been impressive achievements but while it is too early to say whether these reforms are succeeding some anxieties are emerging. These include the rising cost of services with no obvious improvement in outcomes, a growth in hospital provision that may not best meet the needs of the population, rising levels of chronic disease risk factors and an insuffcient focus on public health services, public health leadership, health work-force planning and research.
    World hospitals and health services: the official journal of the International Hospital Federation 01/2013; 49(4):12-7.
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    ABSTRACT: In 2004, France began a diagnosis related groups-based financing system for both public and private acute care hospitals. France opted for a mix of financing systems with over 80% of funding based on diagnosis related groups (DRG). After seven years of DRG-based financing, the French government is testing a payment-for-performance system in acute care hospitals, based on the USA experience. France is currently fine-tuning this model. So far, observations have raised doubts as to whether this approach will improve the value of health care in French hospitals: the budget appears insufficient, the quality of the available indicators is poor and the model is complex. However, it has focused attention on the question of health care quality.
    World hospitals and health services: the official journal of the International Hospital Federation 01/2013; 49(4):18-20.
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    ABSTRACT: Hospital structure is undergoing radical changes, forced by contemporary market trends, new demands from different stakeholders and a common interest in innovation. Health care expenditure around the globe continues to rise at unsustainable levels. In this context efficiency and optimization become the keywords of the process aimed at lowering costs and increasing the quality of care services. Efficiency and optimization leads to innovation, and innovation in the contemporary age leads to the power of information and communication technology (ICT). This paper discusses how ICT became the new shaping tool for hospital environments and highlights one of the best examples of its implementation.
    World hospitals and health services: the official journal of the International Hospital Federation 01/2013; 49(3):4-6.
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    ABSTRACT: The Electronic Medical Record Adoption Model (EMRAM)SM developed by HIMSS Analytics has become a universally recognized maturation model of a hospital's electronic medical record (EMR) environment. Numerous health care organizations (HCOs) throughout the world spend significant time and resources to improve their EMRAM standing. Yet, to the health care information technology (HIT) outsider, the value of the EMRAM and the outcomes of the efforts tied to advancing EMR capabilities are virtually unknown. This is a significant concern when efforts around the EMR compete for scarce health care resources. This article purposes to establish the EMRAM as a valuable framework for policy-makers and hospital leaders. To accomplish this end, we begin with a necessarily brief description of the EMRAM process and stages. Our attention will then turn to examples of the model's use and presence throughout the world, before ending on the ERMAM's benefits for varied health care audiences.
    World hospitals and health services: the official journal of the International Hospital Federation 01/2013; 49(3):7-9.
  • World hospitals and health services: the official journal of the International Hospital Federation 01/2013; 49(3):3.

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