The International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease (INT J TUBERC LUNG D )

Publisher: International Union against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease

Description

The International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease is the official publication of the International Union Against Tuberculosis Lung Disease (IUATLD). It is distributed in over 165 countries world-wide to physicians, health-workers, researchers, professors, students and decision-makers including public health centres, medical, university and pharmaceutical libraries, hospitals, clinics, foundations and institutions. Published principally in English with French and Spanish summaries, selected articles are translated into French, and a Chinese version is distributed three times per year to 4000 colleagues in China. Plans are also underway for versions in Russian and Spanish. The IJTLD is the reference for clinical research and epidemiological studies on tuberculosis. It is also the only peer-reviewed journal dedicated to lung health worldwide, including articles on non-tuberculosis-related respiratory diseases such as asthma, acute respiratory infection, COPD and the hazards of tobacco and pollution - all topics that reflect the wide scope of the activities of the IUATLD and its members.

  • Impact factor
    2.76
    Show impact factor history
     
    Impact factor
  • 5-year impact
    2.50
  • Cited half-life
    6.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.63
  • Eigenfactor
    0.02
  • Article influence
    0.79
  • Website
    International Journal of Tuberculosis & Lung Disease website
  • ISSN
    1027-3719
  • OCLC
    36489431
  • Material type
    Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publications in this journal

  • The International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease 10/2014; 18(10).
  • The International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease 10/2014; 18(10).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: SETTING: Department of Microbiology, National Institute of Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases, New Delhi, India. OBJECTIVES: As paediatric tuberculosis (TB) is a surrogate marker for actively transmitted disease in a community, we investigated drug resistance patterns of 97 Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex strains isolated from children and explored their phylogenetic associations. DESIGN: A total of 111 paediatric patients who attended the out-patient department during the study period 2009-2011 and whose sputum samples were sent to the Microbiology Department for liquid culture and drug susceptibility testing (DST) were included in this study. DST and spoligotyping were performed on cultures positive for M. tuberculosis complex. RESULTS: DST against four first-line drugs showed that 31 of 97 (32%) strains were pan-susceptible, while 66/97 (68%) were resistant to at least one drug, including 55/97 (56.7%) that were resistant to at least isoniazid and rifampicin (i.e., multidrug-resistant). The majority of the isolates (n = 81/90, 90%) belonged to the principal genetic group 1 strains, the most predominant spoligotyping clusters being spoligotyping international type (SIT)1/Beijing (n = 28), SIT26/CAS1-Delhi (n = 27) and SIT53/T1 (n = 6). CONCLUSION: The involvement of Beijing and CAS1-Delhi clades in paediatric TB patients suggests that these two lineages play a major role in ongoing active transmission.
    The International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease 10/2014; 18(10):1172-9.
  • The International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease 10/2014; 18(10).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The impact of tuberculosis (TB) on older adults in Southern Africa is rarely emphasised. The case notification rate in 2004 among the elderly in Soweto was 262 per 100 000 population. The elderly comprised 5.8% of adults and 1.6% of adults notified. Among 110 elderly patients studied, 50% had pulmonary TB, 37% had extra-pulmonary TB (EPTB) and 13% had both. A predisposing disease occurred in 46%. TB was microbiologically proven in 77%. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) status was known for 25 (23%) patients, with 10 (9% of the cohort) being HIV-infected. HIV-infected adults had more EPTB, anaemia and hyponatraemia. Older adults in Soweto bear a high burden of TB.
    The International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease 10/2014; 18(10).
  • The International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease 10/2014; 18(10).
  • The International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease 09/2014; 18(9).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: India's Revised National Tuberculosis Control programme employs passive case detection. The new sputum smear-positive case detection rate is less than 70% in Odisha State. During April–June 2012, active case finding (ACF) was conducted through awareness drives and field-based tuberculosis (TB) screening in select communities with the lowest case detection rates. During the campaign, 240 sputum smear-positive TB cases were detected. The number of smear-positive cases detected increased by 11% relative to April–June 2011 in intervention communities compared to an 0.8% increase in non-intervention communities. ACF brought TB services closer to the community and increased TB case detection.
    The International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease 09/2014; 18(9).
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    ABSTRACT: SETTING: Ioannina University Hospital, Ioannina, Greece.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the value of adding an interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA) to the tuberculin skin test (TST) for detecting latent tuberculous infection (LTBI) in a Greek university hospital among health care workers (HCWs) predominantly vaccinated with bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG).DESIGN: Of 788 HCWs enrolled, 68.1% were BCG-vaccinated. A TST  10 mm was considered positive and was followed by the QuantiFERON-TB® Gold In-Tube assay (QFT-GIT) in a two-step strategy.RESULTS: Of the enrolled HCWs, 36.4% were TST-positive, of whom only 14.4% were IGRA-positive. Agreement between the tests was poor (κ = 0.019; 95%CI −0.014–0.05, P = 0.355). Both TST and IGRA positivity increased with TST diameter, from 5.7% in TST 10–14 mm to 48.8% in TST 20 mm. TST-positive, IGRA-negative results were most likely in younger, recently BCG-vaccinated HCWs (84.6% in those aged 20–29 years) and less likely in older HCWs (45% in those aged 50–59 years). The two-step strategy would have been more cost saving compared to the TST-only approach if adherence to LTBI treatment in our cohort had been 24%.CONCLUSIONS: Poor overall agreement between TST and QFT-GIT was found. Use of IGRA as a second step in TST-positive cases offers an appropriate tool for LTBI detection among BCG-vaccinated HCWs in low-TB-incidence settings.
    The International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease 09/2014; 18(9).
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    ABSTRACT: SETTING: Pediatric multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is complicated by difficult diagnosis, complex treatment, and high mortality. In South Africa, these challenges are amplified by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection; however, evidence on treatment outcomes among co-infected children is limited.OBJECTIVE: Using conventional and new pediatric definitions, to describe treatment outcomes and identify risk factors for unfavorable outcome and mortality in children aged DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study in a regional TB referral hospital.RESULTS: From January 2009 to June 2010, 84 children (median age 8 years, IQR 4–12) with MDR-TB (n = 78) or XDR-TB (n = 6) initiated treatment. Sixty-four (77%) were HIV-positive and 62 (97%) received antiretroviral therapy. Sixty-six (79%) achieved favorable treatment outcomes. Overall mortality was 11% (n = 9) at 18 months after initiation of treatment. Malnutrition (aOR 27.4, 95%CI 2.7–278.7) and severe radiographic findings (aOR 4.68, 95%CI 1.01–21.9) were associated with unfavorable outcome. New pediatric outcome definitions increased the proportion classified as cured.CONCLUSION: It is possible to successfully treat pediatric MDR-TB-HIV even in resource-poor settings. Malnutrition is a marker for severe TB-HIV disease, and is a potential target for future interventions in these patients.
    The International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease 09/2014; 18(9).
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The early diagnosis of mycobacterial infections is a critical step for initiating treatment and curing the patient.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the performance of the reverse blot hybridisation assay (REBA) Myco-ID for the rapid identification of Mycobacterium species in acid-fast bacilli (AFB) smear-positive respiratory specimens.DESIGN: A total of 148 AFB smear-positive respiratory specimens were used for the identification of Mycobacterium species using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) REBA, and the results were compared with the gold standard method as well as culture, PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (PRA) and rpoB sequence analysis.RESULTS: The results of this assay showed that 59/148 samples were positive for M. tuberculosis and 87 were positive for non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM); one sample had mixed infection with both M. tuberculosis and NTM. One case was negative for both M. tuberculosis and NTM and was identified as Nocardia farcinica using PRA and sequence analysis. Of a total of 89 cases, the most frequently identified NTM species were M. intracellulare (n = 28, 31.5%), M. avium (n = 21, 23.6%), M. massiliense (n = 19, 21.3%) and M. abscessus (n = 16, 18.0%).CONCLUSION: The PCR-REBA assay is an efficient tool for the rapid identification of the main Mycobacterium species in clinical specimens. The PCR-REBA assay can therefore provide useful information to physicians for appropriate treatment by clearly identifying Mycobacterium species.
    The International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease 09/2014; 18(9).
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Rapid molecular methods have been recommended for early detection of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB).OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the performance of the GenoType® MTBDRplus assay in routine settings in China.METHODS: Sputum-positive samples were collected consecutively from 1 April to 31 December 2010. MTBDRplus results were compared to those of conventional drug susceptibility testing (DST). The McNemar χ2 test and κ coefficient were used to assess performance.RESULTS: Of 427 smear-positive sputum samples collected, conventional DST and MTBDTplus confirmed drug resistance in 326. The sensitivities and specificities for MTBDRplus in detecting isoniazid (INH) and rifampicin (RMP) resistance were respectively 76.47%, 95.44%, 85.94% and 93.13%. The McNemar χ2 test indicated no significant difference between the two methods (P = 0.106 for INH and P = 0.083 for RMP). The κ values for INH, RMP and multidrug resistance were respectively 0.75, 0.75 and 0.70.CONCLUSIONS: Although the MTBDRplus assay was moderately concordant with conventional DST in detecting INH and RMP resistance, as a prospective rapid molecular method for MDR-TB detection, potential resistant mutations need to be incorporated to improve the accuracy of detection.
    The International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease 09/2014; 18(9).
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To describe clinical presentation across age groups in 2855 children with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) attending the Children's Hospital, Lima, Peru, to improve the diagnosis, treatment and care of childhood TB.DESIGN: Children aged 0–14 years admitted between 1 January 1973 and 31 December 1997 with active pulmonary TB were enrolled. Demographic information, history, physical examination data, laboratory and microbiological results, chest radiograph data, disease classification, treatment and adverse effect data, and outcome at the time of discharge were recorded by pulmonologists using detailed chart abstractions.RESULTS: Of the 2855 enrollees, 47% were malnourished and 56% had a household contact. Older children presented with classic TB symptoms, while weight loss and anorexia were rare in children aged CONCLUSION: Classic TB symptoms should be considered when making a diagnosis; however, systematic symptoms among young children are also important. In high-burden settings, clinicians should have a low threshold to diagnose and treat children for TB across all ages, even in the context of a negative tuberculin skin test result and lack of micro-pathological confirmation.
    The International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease 09/2014; 18(9).
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    ABSTRACT: SETTING: This report describes the management and outcome of neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and paediatric ICU (PICU) exposure to a 26-day-old premature infant with congenital tuberculosis (TB).DESIGN: The infant's mother underwent chest X-ray (CXR) and sputum culture. Contacts of the infant were identified. Tuberculin skin tests (TSTs) were performed on 97 infants and children, 156 NICU and PICU visitors and 115 health care workers.RESULTS: The mother's sputum culture was positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. No TST conversion occurred in the exposed NICU infants. All neonates received prophylactic isoniazid (INH). One exposed child in the PICU had TST conversion with normal CXR and completed 9 months of INH without developing active disease; 22 (14%) PICU and NICU visitors and 3 NICU personnel had TST conversion without evidence of disease.CONCLUSIONS: The sequence of events described here demonstrates the difficulty in diagnosis and management of TB in this age group. Transmission of TB in NICU and PICUs is unusual but can occur, and calls for a systematic approach to investigation of the exposed infants, family members and health care providers.
    The International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease 09/2014; 18(9).
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    ABSTRACT: SETTING: Large specialist paediatric TB clinics in the UK.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate clinical practice and compare with national and international guidelines.DESIGN: A survey based on an electronic questionnaire on the management of latent tuberculous infection (LTBI) and tuberculosis (TB) disease was conducted in 13 specialist paediatric TB clinics. The consensus and discrepancies were evaluated by descriptive analysis.RESULTS: Practice was reportedly different when choosing age limits for preventive treatment for TB contacts with initially negative tuberculin skin tests (TSTs), interpretation of TST results and use of interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs) in the context of LTBI. In relation to management of children with TB disease, practices varied for duration of treatment of osteoarticular TB, monitoring for ethambutol ocular toxicity and use of pyridoxine. There was limited experience with multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB), and over half of the clinics monitored MDR-TB contacts without giving preventive treatment.CONCLUSIONS: The survey showed heterogeneity in several aspects of clinical care for children with TB. Available paediatric TB guidelines differ substantially, explaining the wide variations in management of childhood TB. Prospective paediatric studies are urgently required to inform and standardise clinical practice, especially in the context of evolving drug resistance.
    The International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease 09/2014; 18(9).
  • The International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease 09/2014; 18(9).
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    ABSTRACT: SETTING: Children's Tuberculosis Clinic, Houston, Texas.OBJECTIVE: To describe adherence to and tolerability of 4 months of rifampicin (4RMP) compared to 9 months of isoniazid (9INH) in children with latent tuberculous infection (LTBI).DESIGN: Retrospective descriptive case series of children treated for LTBI from 2010 to 2013 by self-administered therapy or directly observed preventive therapy (DOPT) administered by the local health department.RESULTS: Four hundred and four children were treated, 324 (80%) with 9INH and 80 with 4RMP: the mean age was 7.3 years, and 47% were girls. Of these, 37% were identified during contact investigations. DOPT was used in 51% and self-administered therapy in 49%; 81% completed therapy. Completion of self-administered 4RMP therapy was not significantly different from completion rates for children receiving 9INH administered as DOPT (93% vs. 88%, OR 0.6, 95%CI 0.2–1.7), but was significantly higher than in the 9INH self-administration group (OR 7.9, 95%CI 2.7–23.2). Adverse events were rare: 20 (6%) in the 9INH group and 2 (3%) in the 4RMP group, and none was serious.CONCLUSION: Completion rates for 4RMP surpassed those of 9INH for all methods of delivery, except for DOPT, where completion rates were similar. 4RMP was well tolerated. The increased cost of 4RMP over 9INH may be offset by increased effectiveness, as gauged by completion rates.
    The International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease 09/2014; 18(9).
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    ABSTRACT: SETTING: Israel receives migrants from various countries, some of which have high tuberculosis (TB) prevalence.OBJECTIVE: To assess the predominant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains in Israel isolated during 2008–2010 among Israeli-born and migrant patients, and to investigate possible transmission of TB from migrants to the local population.METHODS: Molecular characterisation employed 43-spacer spoligotyping and 16-loci mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats typing. All patients were classified according to those who were members of a cluster and those who were not.RESULTS: Among 684 M. tuberculosis strains isolated from new patients genotyped and assigned to their specific cohort populations during the study period, major spoligotype families were Central Asian (CAS) (n = 140, 20%), Beijing (n = 101, 15%) and T (n = 160, 23%). Most Beijing strains (66%) were isolated from patients from the former Soviet Union (FSU), while CAS strains were mainly (74%) from Ethiopia, Eritrea and Sudan (EES). For the heterogeneous T-clade, patient countries of origin were 38% EES and 33% FSU.CONCLUSIONS: Predominant M. tuberculosis genotypes in Israel in 2008–2010 were similar to genotypes endemic to the migrants' countries of origin. Epidemiological investigations did not demonstrate transmission between migrants and Israeli-born patients sharing the same cluster.
    The International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease 09/2014; 18(9).
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: There is controversy about the effectiveness of directly observed treatment (DOT) for anti-tuberculosis treatment. This systematic review aimed to synthesise evidence from studies that compared DOT and self-administered treatment (SAT) or different types of DOT for anti-tuberculosis treatment.METHODS: Multiple databases were searched by two independent reviewers to identify relevant randomised (RCTs) and non-randomised studies. The risk of bias was independently assessed by two reviewers, and studies at high risk of bias were excluded. Data extraction was conducted by one reviewer and checked by a second reviewer. Primary outcome measures were cure and treatment success.RESULTS: We included eight RCTs and 15 non-randomised studies that were predominantly conducted in low- and middle-income countries. There was no convincing evidence that clinic DOT was more effective than SAT. Evidence from both RCTs and non-randomised studies suggested that community DOT was more effective than SAT. Community DOT was as effective as, or more effective than, clinic DOT. There was no statistically significant difference in results between family and non-family community DOT.CONCLUSIONS: Community DOT by non-family members might be the best option if it is more convenient to patients and less costly to health services than clinic DOT.
    The International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease 09/2014; 18(9).

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