Fresenius Environmental Bulletin (FRESEN ENVIRON BULL)

Journal description

Current impact factor: 0.53

Impact Factor Rankings

2015 Impact Factor Available summer 2015
2013 / 2014 Impact Factor 0.527
2012 Impact Factor 0.641
2011 Impact Factor 0.66
2010 Impact Factor 0.716
2009 Impact Factor 0.531
2008 Impact Factor 0.463
2007 Impact Factor 0.429
2006 Impact Factor 0.452
2005 Impact Factor 0.509
2004 Impact Factor 0.48
2003 Impact Factor 0.325
2002 Impact Factor 0.309
2001 Impact Factor 0.297
2000 Impact Factor 0.277
1999 Impact Factor 0.225
1998 Impact Factor 0.306
1997 Impact Factor 0.257
1996 Impact Factor 0.255

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 0.59
Cited half-life 4.80
Immediacy index 0.06
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.08
Website Fresenius Environmental Bulletin website
Other titles FEB
ISSN 1018-4619
OCLC 26350423
Material type Periodical
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • Fresenius Environmental Bulletin 06/2015; 24(6).
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    ABSTRACT: A model based in an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) was developed in order to forecast the Olea airborne pollen concentration due to the allergenic power of its pollen grains. There were used daily data from Olea pollen and the main meteorological variables documented in the period 1993-2008. The model was carried out in the Spanish city of Ourense. The model was tested with data from 2009 and 2010, obtaining data with one day of anticipation. Obtained results could be employed in allergology and health sciences in order to prevent effect of pollinosis.
    Fresenius Environmental Bulletin 06/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to determine mineral and heavy metal levels of some temperate fruit species such as sweet cherry, black mulberry, white mulberry, apricot, apple, plum, peach, pear, hawthorn and rosehip grown in Aras Valley, located in the east part of Turkey. The concentration of mineral and heavy metal levels in the leaves and fruits of fruit species were detected by ICP-OES. The content of heavy metals in fruit samples were determined in the range of 50.16-90.11, 9.45-82.15, 12.69-65.24, 10.24-30.24, 1.12-5.89, 1.62-3.42, 0.36-1.36 and 0.01-0.09 mg/kg for Fe, Cu, Mn, Zn, Cd, Pb, Ni and Cr, respectively. The highest content of Fe, Cu, Mn, Zn, Cd, Pb, Ni and Cr in fruit samples were detected in Plum (yellow), Sweet cherry, Plum (red), Black mulberry, Plum (sarali), Plum (yellow), White mulberry and Plum (red), respectively. All of fruit samples were found to be contaminated with high levels of Cu, Cd, Pb. Moreover, the contents of Zn in fruits were higher levels than the per-missible limits of FAO/WHO. However, the contents of Ni, Cr, Fe and Mn did not appear to reach pollution levels in the fruit samples. The results illustrated that a strong relationship exists between leaf and fruit samples with regards to all minerals in the fruit species and cultivars.
    Fresenius Environmental Bulletin 04/2015; 24(4).
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to determine mineral and heavy metal levels of some temperate fruit species such as sweet cherry, black mulberry, white mulberry, apricot, apple, plum, peach, pear, hawthorn and rosehip grown in Aras Valley, located in the east part of Turkey. The con-centration of mineral and heavy metal levels in the leaves and fruits of fruit species were detected by ICP-OES. The content of heavy metals in fruit samples were determined in the range of 50.16-90.11, 9.45-82.15, 12.69-65.24, 10.24-30.24, 1.12-5.89, 1.62-3.42, 0.36-1.36 and 0.01-0.09 mg/kg for Fe, Cu, Mn, Zn, Cd, Pb, Ni and Cr, re-spectively. The highest content of Fe, Cu, Mn, Zn, Cd, Pb, Ni and Cr in fruit samples were detected in Plum (yellow), Sweet cherry, Plum (red), Black mulberry, Plum (sarali), Plum (yellow), White mulberry and Plum (red), respectively. All of fruit samples were found to be con-taminated with high levels of Cu, Cd, Pb. Moreover, the contents of Zn in fruits were higher levels than the per-missible limits of FAO/WHO. However, the contents of Ni, Cr, Fe and Mn did not appear to reach pollution levels in the fruit samples. The results illustrated that a strong relationship exists between leaf and fruit samples with regards to all minerals in the fruit species and cultivars.
    Fresenius Environmental Bulletin 04/2015; 24(4).
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract To identify the tracer emission from the diesel engines and to evaluate the environmental pollution caused by traffic emission inside the tunnel, fine particulate matter (PM) samples collected in the tunnel of Krraba (Tirana-Elbasan highway) were analyzed for heavy metals content (Cu, Fe, Hg, Pb, Mn, Ni, and Zn) in relation to different distances from the entrance portal to the exit portal of the tunnel. The horizontal ventilation systems of the tunnel, located next to the tunnel portals, were not permanently function during the both monitoring periods. Dust samples collected in front of the entrance portal show low metal content that is gradually increased as the distance from the entrance to the exit portal increased. High contents of metals in dust samples were found that indicates the dust samples are efficient to be used for the monitoring of heavy metal pollution caused by tunnel’s traffic exhausts over the time, even with low sensitivity analytical methods. The data onto two different monitoring periods shows different views of metal distributions. The first monitoring period (November 2013) is characterized by high Fe content in dust samples, by indicating the high effect of soil dust caused by construction activity during this monitoring period. The second monitoring period (March 2014) is characterized by higher content of Cu, Hg, Zn and Mn that are typical elements of the anthropogenic sources related mainly to traffic emissions. The multivariate analysis of dimensionality reduction technique, factor analysis (FA), was used to identify the most potential factors of these tracers. The FA and Cluster analysis of trace metal concentrations data show that the Hg and Pb onto PM samples, are probably linked with the diesel engine emissions. Keywords: Traffic emission, Particulate matter, Heavy metals, Factor analysis, Cluster analysis;
    Fresenius Environmental Bulletin 03/2015; 24(7).
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    ABSTRACT: A screening study was conducted in order to determine the genotypic differences of 20 maize varieties, and to evaluate the mechanism of ion regulation under salt stress conditions. The study was arranged in a completely randomized plot design with 4 replications under controlled conditions in 2013. Seeds were planted in plastic pots with a mixture of peat:perlite at a ratio of 2:1. At 27 days after sowing, the salt (NaCl) treatment was started. The varieties were classified according to the severity of the leaf damage symptoms, using symptoms score of 1-5. The fresh and dry shoot weights, fresh and dry root weight, leaf number, plant height, stem diameter, relative water content, and the shoot and root concentrations of sodium, potassium, calcium, and chlorine were also investigated. The varieties exposed to 250 mM NaCl application developed different mechanisms to be protected against toxic effects of Na ion. Salt tolerant varieties limited Na accumulation and acted selectively among ions. K and Ca concentrations were high in shoot and root in which Na concentration was low, and tolerant varieties had higher K/Na and Ca/Na ratios than sensitive varieties. In conclusion, the maize varieties showed a wide variation in their response to salt stress. Reliable and effective screening parameters, such as scale, shoot and root freshdry weight, ion content, for determination of salt tolerance level of the maize varieties were discussed. Overall findings suggest that PG 1661, Ada 523, Colonia, PG Pasha, and PG 1610 varieties were more tolerant varieties than the other ones.
    Fresenius Environmental Bulletin 02/2015; 24(1):124-131.
  • Fresenius Environmental Bulletin 02/2015; 24(20):683-689.
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    ABSTRACT: Experiments were conducted on sweet bush basil (Oci- mum basilicum L.) and on peppermint (Mentha piperita L.) plants grown in pots under glasshouse conditions to study the interaction between Cd and Zn on the concentration of these metals in plant leaves. A factorial experiment with two factors (Cd and Zn) at four concentrations (0, 1, 5, 10 mg kg-1) was carried out for each plant species. Cadmium was applied as CdSO48/3H2O and Zn as ZnSO47H2O. In- creasing Cd additions to the growth medium resulted in an increase in Cd concentration in leaves of sweet bush basil and increasing Zn additions to the growth medium resulted in an increase in Zn concentration in the leaves of pepper- mint. No significant effects were observed of Zn on Cd and Cd on Zn in the leaves of sweet bush basil and peppermint, respectively. Cd concentration increased significantly at each Cd level with increasing Zn additions in leaves of pep- permint. Cd concentration increased significantly at each Cd level with increasing Zn additions in leaves of sweet bush basil. The Cd concentration in the leaves of pepper- mint increased with increasing Zn additions to the growth medium but the Zn concentration was not affected by Cd addition to the growth medium. The amounts of Cd and Zn extracted by Diethylene triamine penta acetic acid – trieth- anol amine (DTPA-TEA) increased significantly with in- creasing amounts of Cd and Zn additions to the growth me- dium and also showed significant interaction. DTPA-TEA extractable Cd and Zn significantly correlated with the Cd and Zn concentrations within the leaves of both species studied indicating that this extractant could be used to pre- dict Cd and Zn concentrations in the plant tissues of sweet bush basil and peppermint.
    Fresenius Environmental Bulletin 02/2015; 24(1):77-83.
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    ABSTRACT: In this paper, photocatalytic degradation of 1-Naphthol was investigated in an aerated UV/TiO2 batch system. The effects of influential parameters such as catalyst loading, initial 1-Naphthol concentration, pH value, inorganic salts and type of light sources on the reaction rate were studied, and the optimum conditions for the maximum degradation rate were determined. The photocatalytic degradation process was well described by pseudo-first order reaction. The results of experiments showed that photocatalytic degradation of 1-Naphthol is strongly influenced by these parameters. The optimum TiO2 loading, which provides enough surface area for reaction without irradiation loss due to scattering of UV light, was found to be 1.0 g/l, and 1-Naphthol concentration was 100ppm. Higher degradation efficiency of 1-Naphthol was observed at pH=9 values. Furthermore, the effects of inorganic salts were investigated. Result showed that photocatalytic degradation rate was affected significantly in the presence of carbonate and sulfate.
    Fresenius Environmental Bulletin 01/2015; 24(1):139-145.
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    ABSTRACT: The community structure and biomass of pelagic phototrophs, with particular attention to the picoplanktonic size fraction, were studied in a eutrophic Lake Strzeszyskie in the Wielkopolska Lakeland (western Poland). Phototrophic community included prokaryotic cells, such as oxyphotobacteria (cyanobacteria), anoxyphotobacteria, eukaryotic cells representing cryptophytes, dinophytes, diatoms, chrysophytes, xanthophytes, haptophytes, and green algae. 112 taxa of the phototrophs were recorded. Most of them were eukaryotic cells (83 species), including chlorophytes (48) and diatoms (15). The range of the photortophs biomass was between 0.1 and about 3 mg l-1, and its maximum was at 8 m depth, mostly due to eukaryotic cells. In the shallower waters layers the contributions of the cyanobacteria and the eukaryotes to the total biomass were very similar. Starting from 10 m anoxyphotobacteria increased in importance and near the bottom their contribution to phototrophic biomass exceed 50%. The smallest phototrophs were dominated by the picocyanobacteria. The joint contribution of pico- and nanoplankton in the water column ranged significantly. In the epilimnion it was about 30%, in the upper part of metalimnion it reached 50%, and in the lower part of hypolimnion they accounted for 70% of total phototrophic biomass. In the microplankton, the highest biomass was produced by the filamentous cyanobacteria and phytoflagellates. These examinations are pointing out to the need for a holistic approach to the photosynthetic organisms and show that at increasing depths different groups of phototrophs play the role as major producers.
    Fresenius Environmental Bulletin 01/2015; 24(1):355-364.