Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology Impact Factor & Information

Publisher: Hanʼguk Sanŏp Misaengmul Hakhoe

Journal description

Current impact factor: 1.32

Impact Factor Rankings

2015 Impact Factor Available summer 2015
2013 / 2014 Impact Factor 1.32
2012 Impact Factor 1.399
2011 Impact Factor 1.381
2010 Impact Factor 1.224
2008 Impact Factor 2.062
2007 Impact Factor 2.062
2006 Impact Factor 2.037
2005 Impact Factor 1.744
2004 Impact Factor 1.663
2003 Impact Factor 1.202
2002 Impact Factor 1.364
2001 Impact Factor 1.338
2000 Impact Factor 1.083
1999 Impact Factor 0.809
1998 Impact Factor 0.436
1997 Impact Factor 0.226

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 1.47
Cited half-life 4.60
Immediacy index 0.12
Eigenfactor 0.01
Article influence 0.37
Website Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology website
ISSN 1017-7825
OCLC 261226927
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Rhizospheric zone abutting plant roots usually clutches a wealth of microbes. In recent past, enormous genetic resources have been excavated with potential applications in host plant interaction and ancillary aspects. Two Pseudomonads were isolated and identified through 16S rRNA and rpoD sequence analyses as P. fluorescens QAU-67 and P. putida QAU-90. Initial biochemical characterization and their root-colonizing traits indicated their potential role in plant growth promotion. Some such aerobic systems, involved in gluconic acid production and phosphate solubilization, essentially require the PQQ dependent glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) in the genome. The PCR screening and amplification of GDH and PQQ and subsequent induction of mutagenesis characterized for their possible role in growth promotion was probed in vitro in lettuce while in vivo in rice, bean and tomato plants. The results showed significant differences (p≤0.05) in parameters such as: plant height, fresh weight and dry weight etc., deciphering a clear and in fact complementary role of GDH and PQQ in plant growth promotion. Our study not only provides direct evidence on the in vivo role of GDH and PQQ in host plants but also reveals their functional inadequacy in the event of mutation at either of these loci.
    Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology 05/2015; 25(5).
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    ABSTRACT: Cadaverine (1, 5-diaminopentane) is an important industrial chemical with a wide range of applications. Although there have been many efforts to produce cadaverine through fermentation, but there are not many reports of the direct cadaverine production from lysine using biotransformation. Whole-cell reactions were examined using recombinant Escherichia 35 coli strain that overexpressing the E.coli MG1655 cadA gene and various parameters were 36 investigated for the whole-cell bioconversion of lysine to cadaverine. The high concentration of lysine resulting that the synthesis of pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP) and it was found that a critical control factor for the biotransformation of lysine to cadaverine. When 0.025 mM PLP and 1.75 M lysine in 500 mM sodium acetate buffer (pH6) were used, 91% of consumption and about 80% conversion of lysine to cadaverine were successfully achieved.
    Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology 02/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Cadaverine (1, 5-diaminopentane) is an important industrial chemical with a wide range of applications. Although there have been many efforts to produce cadaverine through fermentation, but there are not many reports of the direct cadaverine production from lysine using biotransformation. Whole-cell reactions were examined using recombinant Escherichia 35 coli strain that overexpressing the E.coli MG1655 cadA gene and various parameters were 36 investigated for the whole-cell bioconversion of lysine to cadaverine. The high concentration of lysine resulting that the synthesis of pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP) and it was found that a critical control factor for the biotransformation of lysine to cadaverine. When 0.025 mM PLP and 1.75 M lysine in 500 mM sodium acetate buffer (pH6) were used, 91% of consumption and about 80% conversion of lysine to cadaverine were successfully achieved.
    Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology 02/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: The interactive inhibitory effects of pH and chloride on the catalysis of laccase from Trametes versicolor were investigated by studying the alteration of inhibition characteristics of sodium chloride at different pHs for the oxidation of 2,2'-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid). At pH 3.0, the addition of sodium chloride (50 mM) brought about a 40-fold increase in K-m(aPP) and a 4-fold decrease in V-max(app). As the pH increased to 7.0, the inhibitory effects of sodium chloride became significantly weakened. The mixed-inhibition mechanism was successfully used to quantitatively estimate the competitive and uncompetitive inhibition strengths by chloride at two different pHs (pH 3.0 and 6.0). At pH 3.0, the competitive inhibition constant, K-i, was 0.35 mM, whereas the uncompetitive inhibition constant, K-i', was 18.1 mM, indicating that the major cause of the laccase inhibition by chloride is due to the competitive inhibition step. At a higher pH of 6.0, where the inhibition of the laccase by hydroxide ions takes effect, the inhibition of the laccase by chloride diminished to a great extent, showing increased values of both the competitive inhibition constant (K-i = 23.7 mM) and uncompetitive inhibition constant (K-i' = 324 mM). These kinetic results evidenced that the hydroxide anion and chloride share a common mechanism to inhibit the laccase activity.
    Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology 12/2014; 24(12):1673-1678. DOI:10.4014/jmb.1408.08012
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    ABSTRACT: The plant pathogen Burkholderia gladioli, which has a broad host range that includes rice and onion, causes bacterial panicle blight and sheath rot. Based on the complete genome sequence of B. gladioli BSR3 isolated from infected rice sheaths, the genome of B. gladioli BSR3 contains the luxI/luxR family of genes. Members of this family encode N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) quorum sensing (QS) signal synthase and the LuxR-family AHL signal receptor, which are similar to B. glumae BGR1. In B. glumae, QS has been shown to play pivotal roles in many bacterial behaviors. In this study, we compared the QS-dependent gene expression between B. gladioli BSR3 and a QS-defective B. gladioli BSR3 mutant in two different culture states (10 and 24 h after incubation, corresponding to an exponential phase and a stationary phase) using RNA sequencing (RNA-seq). RNA-seq analyses including gene ontology and pathway enrichment revealed that the B. gladioli BSR3 QS system regulates genes related to motility, toxin production, and oxalogenesis, which were previously reported in B. glumae. Moreover, the uncharacterized polyketide biosynthesis is activated by QS, which was not detected in B. glumae. Thus, we observed not only common QS-dependent genes between B. glumae BGR1 and B. gladioli BSR3, but also unique QS-dependent genes in B. gladioli BSR3.
    Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology 12/2014; 24(12):1609-1621. DOI:10.4014/jmb.1408.08064
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    ABSTRACT: We present here an in silico search of fungal sterol-esterase/lipase and bacterial depolymerase sequences from environmental metagenomes. Both enzyme types contain the α/β-hydrolase protein fold. Analysis of DNA conserved motifs, protein homology search, phylogenetic analysis and protein 3D modeling have been used, and the efficiency of these screening strategies is discussed. The presence of bacterial genes in the metagenomes was higher than those from fungi, and the sequencing depth of the metagenomes seems to be crucial to allow finding enough diversity of enzyme sequences. As result a novel putative PHA-depolymerase is described.
    Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The entire nucleotide sequence of the TKL1 gene encoding transketolase (TKL) in an erythritolproducing yeast of Candida magnoliae was determined by degenerate polymerase chain reaction and genome walking. Sequence analysis revealed an open reading frame of C. magnoliae TKL1 (CmTKL1) that spans 2,088 bp and encodes 696 amino acids, sharing 61.7% amino acid identity to Kluyveromyces lactis TKL. Functional analysis showed that CmTKL1 complemented a Saccharomyces cerevisiae tkl1 tkl2 double mutant for growth in the absence of aromatic amino acids and restored transketolase activity in this mutant. An enzyme activity assay and RT-PCR revealed that the expression of CmTKL1 is induced by fructose, H2O2, and KCl. The GenBank accession number for C. magnoliae TKL1 is KF751756.
    Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology 10/2014; 24(10):1389-96. DOI:10.4014/jmb.1407.07032
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    ABSTRACT: Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) has been used for the treatment of urinary tract infectinons but increasing resistance to TMP-SMX has been reported. In this study, we analyzed TMP-SMX resistance genes and their relatedness with integrons and insertion sequence common regions (ISCRs) in uropathogenic gram negative bacilli. Consecutive non-duplicate TMP-SMX non-susceptible clinical isolates of E. coli, K. pneumoniae, Acinetobacter spp., and P. aeruginosa were collected from urine. Minimal inhibitory concentration was determined by Etest. TMP-SMX resistance genes (sul and dfr), integrons and ISCRs were analyzed by PCR and sequencing. A total of 45 E. coli (37.8%), 15 K. pneumoniae (18.5%), 12 Acinetobacter spp. (70.6%), and 9 Pseudomonas aeruginosa (30.0%) isolates were found to be resistant to TMX- SMX. Their MICs were all over 640. In E. coli and K. pneumonia, sul1 and dfr genes were highly prevalent in relation with integron1. Sul3 gene was detected in E. coli. In P. aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp., only sul1 was prevalent in relation with class 1 integron, however, dfr was not detected and sul2 was less prevalent than in Enterobacteriaceae. ISCR1 and/or ISCR2 were detected in E. coli, K. pnuemoniae, and Acinetobacter spp. but relatedness with TMP-SMX resistance genes was not prominent. ISCR14 was detected in 6 isolates of E. coli. In conclusion, resistance mechanisms for TMX-SMX were different between Enterobacteriaceae and glucose non-fermenting gram negative bacilli. Class 1 integron was widely disseminated in uropathogenic gram negative baciili, so adoption of prudent use of antimicrobial agents and establishment of surveillance system are needed.
    Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology 10/2014; 25(1). DOI:10.4014/jmb.1409.09041
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    ABSTRACT: Staphylococcus aureus is an important food-borne pathogen that causes a diverse diseases ranging from minor infections to life threatening conditions in humans and animals. To further understand its pathogenesis, the genome of the strain S. aureus FORC_001 was isolated from a contaminated food. Its genome consists of 2,886,017bp double-stranded DNA with a GC content of 32.8%. It is predicted to contain 2,728 open reading frames (ORFs), 57 tRNAs, and 6 rRNA operons, including 1 additional 5S rRNA gene. Comparative phylogenetic tree analysis of 40 complete S. aureus genome sequences using average nucleotide identity (ANI) revealed that the strain FORC_001 belonged to Group I. The closest phylogenetic match was S. aureus MRSA252 according to a whole genome ANI (99.87%), suggesting that they might share a common ancestor. Comparative genome analysis of FORC_001 and MRSA252 revealed two non-homologous regions: Regions I and II. The presence of various antibiotic resistance genes, including the SCCmec cluster in Region I of MRSA252, suggests that this strain might have acquired the SCCmec cluster to adapt to specific environments containing methicillin. Region II of both genomes contains prophage regions but their DNA sequence identity is very low, suggesting that the prophages might differ. This is the first report of the complete genome sequence of S. aureus isolated from a real food-borne outbreak in South Korea. This report would be helpful to extend our understanding about genome, general characteristics, and virulence factors of S. aureus for further studies of pathogenesis, rapid detection, and epidemiological investigation in food-borne outbreak.
    Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology 10/2014; 25(1). DOI:10.4014/jmb.1410.10005
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    ABSTRACT: The bacterial diversity of 10 marine sponges belonging to the species Cliona celata, an unidentified Cliona species, Haliclona cinerea, Halichondria okadai, Hymeniacidon sinapium, Lissodendoryx isodictyalis, Penares incrustans, Spirastrella abata, and Spirastrella panis collected from Jeju and Chuja Island was investigated using amplicon pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA genes. The microbial diversity of these sponges has as of yet rarely or never been investigated. All sponges except Cliona celata, Lissodendoryx isodictyalis and Penares incrustans showed simple bacterial diversity, in which one or two bacterial OTUs occupied more than 50% of the pyrosequencing reads and their OTU rank abundance curves saturated quickly. Most of the predominant OTUs belonged to Alpha-, Beta-, or Gammaproteobacteria. Some of the OTUs from the sponges with low diversity were distantly (88%~89%) or moderately (93%~97%) related to known sequences in the GenBank nucleotide database. Phylogenetic analysis showed that many of the representative sequences of the OTUs were related to the sequences originating from sponges and corals, and formed sponge-specific or -related clades. The marine sponges investigated herein harbored unexplored bacterial diversity, and further studies should be done to understand the microbes present in sponges.
    Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology 10/2014; 25(1). DOI:10.4014/jmb.1406.06041
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    ABSTRACT: Baeyer-Villiger (BV) oxidation of cyclohexanone to epsilon-caprolactone in a microbial system expressing cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO) can be influenced by not only efficient regeneration of NADPH but also sufficient supply of oxygen. In this study, bacterial hemoglobin gene from Vitreoscilla stercoraria (vhb) was introduced into the recombinant Escherichia coli expressing CHMO to investigate the effects of an oxygen-carrying protein on microbial BV oxidation of cyclohexanone. Coexpression of Vhb allowed the recombinant E. coli strain to produce maximum epsilon-caprolactone concentration of 15.7 g/l in a fed-batch BV oxidation of cyclohexanone, which corresponded to 43% improvement compared with the control strain expressing CHMO only under the same conditions.
    Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology 10/2014; 24(12). DOI:10.4014/jmb.1409.09060
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    ABSTRACT: During pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass, a variety of fermentation inhibitors including acetic acid and vanillin are released. Using DNA microarray analysis, this study explored genes of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that respond to vanillin induced stress. Expression of 273 genes was upregulated and that of 205 genes was downregulated under vanillin stress. Significantly induced genes include MCH2, SNG1, GPH1, and TMA10, whereas NOP2, UTP18, FUR1, and SPR1 were down-regulated. Sequence analysis of the 5'-flanking region of upregulated genes suggested that vanillin might regulate gene expression in a stress response element (STRE)-dependent manner, in addition to a pathway that involved the transcription factor Yap1p. Retardation in cell growth of mutant strains indicated that MCH2, SNG1 and GPH1 are intimately involved in vanillin stress response. Deletion of the genes whose expression levels were decreased under vanillin stress did not result in a notable change in S. cerevisiae growth under vanillin stress. This study will provide the basis for better understanding of the stress response of the yeast S. cerevisiae to fermentation inhibitors.
    Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology 10/2014; 25(1). DOI:10.4014/jmb.1409.09064
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    ABSTRACT: The hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA genome is replicated by an RNA replicase complex (RC) consisting of cellular proteins and viral nonstructural (NS) proteins including NS5B, an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) and key enzyme for viral RNA genome replication. The HCV RC is known to be associated with an intracellular membrane structure, but the cellular components of the RC and their roles in the formation of the HCV RC have not been well characterized. In this study, we took a proteomic approach to identify stomatin, a member of the integral proteins of lipid rafts, as a cellular protein interacting with HCV NS5B. Co-immunoprecipitation and co-localization studies confirmed the interaction between stomatin and NS5B. We demonstrated that the subcellular fraction containing viral NS proteins and stomatin displays RdRp activity. Membrane flotation assays with the HCV genome replication-competent subcellular fraction revealed that the HCV RdRp and stomatin are associated with the lipid raft-like domain of membranous structures. Stomatin silencing by RNA interference led to the release of the NS5B from the detergent-resistant membrane, thereby inhibiting HCV replication in both HCV subgenomic replicon-harboring cells and HCV-infected cells. Our results identify stomatin as a cellular protein that plays a role in the formation of an enzymatically active HCV RC on a detergent-resistant membrane structure.
    Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology 09/2014; 24(12). DOI:10.4014/jmb.1409.09063
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    ABSTRACT: During an investigation of the fungal diversity of Korean soils, four Penicillium strains could not be assigned to any described species. The strains formed monoverticillate conidiophores with occasionally a divaricate branch. The conidia were smooth or finely rough-walled, globose to broadly ellipsoidal and 2.5-3.5 × 2.0-3.0 µm in size. Their taxonomic novelty was determined using partial β-tubulin gene sequences and ribosomal internal transcribed spacer region. The phylogenetic analysis showed that the isolates belonged to section Lanata-divaricata and were most closely related to Penicillium raperi. Phenotypically, the strains differed from P. raperi in having longer stipes. Strain KACC 47721(T) from bamboo field soil was designated as type strain of the new species, and the species was named as Penicillium koreense sp. nov. as it was isolated from various regions in Korea.
    Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology 09/2014; 24(12). DOI:10.4014/jmb.1406.06074
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    ABSTRACT: Methane is considered as a next generation carbon feedstock due to vast reserves of natural and shale gas. Methane can be converted to methanol by various methods, which in turn can be used as a starting chemical for the production of value-added chemicals using existing chemical conversion processes. Methane monooxygenase is the key enzyme that catalyzes addition of oxygen to methane. Methanotrophic bacteria can transform methane to methanol by inhibiting methanol dehydrogenase. In this paper, we review the recent progress on biocatalytic conversion of methane to methanol as a key step for methane-based refinery systems and discuss future prospects for this technology.
    Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology 09/2014; 24(12). DOI:10.4014/jmb.1407.07070