Journal of Forestry Research (J Forest Res )

Publisher: Dongbei lin ye da xue (China); Ecological Society of China, Springer Verlag

Description

The Journal of Forestry Research offers articles dealing with all aspects of forestry. It is primarily a medium for reporting original theoretical and experimental research, as well as technical reviews. Approximately 85 per cent of the papers published in the journal are by Chinese scientists, professors and doctoral degree students; the balance are contributed by researchers in other countries. Through 16 years of development and improvement, the Journal of Forestry Research has earned a reputation as an important international academic journal.

  • Impact factor
    0.00
  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
    0.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.00
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
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  • Website
    Journal of Forestry Research website
  • Other titles
    Journal of forestry research (Online), Ecosystem management, Lin ye yan jiu, JFR
  • ISSN
    1007-662X
  • OCLC
    67617801
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Springer Verlag

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Author's pre-print on pre-print servers such as arXiv.org
    • Author's post-print on author's personal website immediately
    • Author's post-print on any open access repository after 12 months after publication
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set phrase to accompany link to published version (see policy)
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In Boswellia papyrifera (Del.) Hochst natural stands, we studied the association of parasitic plants with B. papyrifera trees from which frankincense was tapped and marketed for domestic and export markets. Data on the rate of infection of parasitic plants on B. papyrifera was collected in three transects located at separate locations around Baha kar, northern Ethiopia. Each transect had ten circular sample plots of 400 m2 and separated by 100 m. Species composition, DBH, height, crown diameter, number of main, secondary and tertiary branches and number of parasitic plants on individual trees were recorded. Sixteen tree species were recorded in the combined sample plots. The parasitic plant associated with B. papyrifera was identified as Tapinanthus globiferus. This parasite infected 38% of Boswellia trees in sample plots. The infection rate of the parasitic plant varied from 1 to 33 per Boswellia tree. The infection of T. globiferus on B. papyrifera was predominantly limited to tertiary small branchlets arising from secondary branches; parasitic plants were absent on thick main and secondary branches. In all plots, infection of T. globiferus was exclusively limited to Boswellia trees. The influence of T. globiferus parasitism on growth of Boswellia trees and its influence on yield of incense production needs further investigation. Management of natural stands for frankincense production should include measures to reduce infection by T. globiferus.
    Journal of Forestry Research 12/2014; 25(4).
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    ABSTRACT: Calorific value of plants is an important parameter for evaluating and indexing material cycles and energy conversion in forest ecosystems. Based on mensuration data of 150 sample sets, we analyzed the calorific value (CV) and ash content (AC) of different parts of Masson pine (Pinus massoniana) trees in southern China using hypothesis testing and regression analysis. CV and AC of different tree parts were almost significantly different (P branch > stem bark > root > stem wood, and AC ranked as foliage > stem bark > root > branch > stem wood. CV and AC of stem wood from the top, middle and lower sections of trees differed significantly. CV increased from the top to the lower sections of the trunk while AC decreased. Mean gross calorific value (GCV) and AFCV of aboveground parts were significantly higher than those of belowground parts (roots). The mean GCV, AFCV and AC of a whole tree of Masson pine were 21.54 kJ/g, 21.74 kJ/g and 0.90%, respectively. CV and AC of different tree parts were, to some extent, correlated with tree diameter, height and origin.
    Journal of Forestry Research 12/2014; 25(4).
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    ABSTRACT: Farmers in the highlands of Ethiopia often plant Eucalyptus on their farmlands. However, growing Eucalyptus, especially on farmlands suitable for crop production has become a great concern due to its alleged long-term site effects. Our study was conducted at Koga watershed, Mecha District, northwestern Ethiopia to investigate whether croplands afforested with Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehnh. can be restored for annual crop production after tree harvest. We compared growth and yield of two agricultural crops, barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and finger millet (Eleusine coracana (L.) Gaertn.), grown in clear-felled stands of E. camaldulensis and continuously cultivated croplands at twelve paired farmlands under a conventional farming system. Plant height and dry matter production were evaluated as indices of crop growth, while grain weight was evaluated as an index of crop yield. Crop growth and yield measurements averaged over all farmlands differed between land-use types. For both crops, plants grown on clear-felled stands were taller than on croplands. Dry matter production and yield were also significantly greater in crops cultivated on clear-felled stands. Cropland aboveground and belowground dry matter productions were lower by 31.8 and 25.4% for barley and 32.8% and 37% for finger millet, respectively. Clear-felled stands gave an average yield of 2.91 t·ha−1 for barley and 3.27 t·ha−1 for finger millet while cropland gave a yield of 1.97 and 2.31 t·ha−1 for barley and finger millet, respectively. Farmers also responded that farm plots on former eucalypt plantations showed greater crop growth and yield than did continuously cultivated croplands. Farmers perceived that Eucalyptus plantations improved soil fertility and they preferred clear-felled stands for crop production and wished to plant Eucalyptus on their farmlands. Our results suggest that conversion of agricultural lands to Eucalyptus plantations can increase post-felling yields of cereal crops.
    Journal of Forestry Research 12/2014; 25(4).
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    ABSTRACT: Deforestation occurs at an alarming rate in upland watersheds of Bangladesh and has many detrimental effects on the environment. This study reports the effects of deforestation on soil biological properties along with some important physicochemical parameters of a southern upland watershed in Bangladesh. Soils were sampled at 4 paired sites, each pair representing a deforested site and a forested site, and having similar topographical characteristics. Significantly fewer (p≤0.001) fungi and bacteria, and lower microbial respiration, active microbial biomass, metabolic and microbial quotients were found in soils of the deforested sites. Soil physical properties such as moisture content, water holding capacity, and chemical properties such as organic matter, total N, available P and EC were also lower in deforested soils. Bulk density and pH were significantly higher in deforested soils. Available Ca and Mg were inconsistent between the two land uses at all the paired sites. Reduced abundance and biomass of soil mesofauna were recorded in deforested soils. However, soil anecic species were more abundant in deforested soils than epigeic and endogeic species, which were more abundant in forested soils than on deforested sites.
    Journal of Forestry Research 12/2014; 25(4).
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to characterize the land use, vegetation structure, and diversity in the Barnowpara Sanctuary, Raipur district, Chhattisgarh, India through the use of satellite remote sensing and GIS. Land cover and vegetation were spatially analyzed by digitally classifying IRS 1D LISS III satellite data using a maximum likelihood algorithm. Later, the variations in structure and diversity in different forest types and classes were quantified by adopting quadratic sampling procedures. Nine land-cover types were delineated: teak forest, dense mixed forest, degraded mixed forest, Sal mixed forest, open mixed forest, young teak plantation, grasslands, agriculture, habitation, and water bodies. The classification accuracy for different land-use classes ranged from 71.23% to 100%. The highest accuracy was observed in water bodies and grassland, followed by habitation and agriculture, teak forest, degraded mixed forest, and dense mixed forest. The accuracy was lower in open mixed forest, and sal mixed forest. Results revealed that density of different forest types varied from 324 to 733 trees ha-1, basal area from 8.13 to 28.87 m2·ha−1 and number of species from 20 to 40. Similarly, the diversity ranged from 1.36 to 2.98, concentration of dominance from 0.06 to 0.49, species richness from 3.88 to 6.86, and beta diversity from 1.29 to 2.21. The sal mixed forest type recorded the highest basal area, diversity was highest in the dense mixed forest, and the teak forest recorded maximum density, which was poor in degraded mixed forests. The study also showed that Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) was strongly correlated to with the Shannon Index and species richness.
    Journal of Forestry Research 12/2014; 25(4).
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    ABSTRACT: We developed a three-step classification approach for forest road extraction utilizing LiDAR data. The first step employed the IDW method to interpolate LiDAR point data (first and last pulses) to achieve DSM, DTM and DNTM layers (at 1 m resolution). For this interpolation RMSE was 0.19 m. In the second step, the Support Vector Machine (SVM) was employed to classify the LiDAR data into two classes, road and non-road. For this classification, SVM indicated the merged distance layer with intensity data and yielded better identification of the road position. Assessments of the obtained results showed 63% correctness, 75% completeness and 52% quality of classification. In the next step, road edges were defined in the LiDAR-extracted layers, enabling accurate digitizing of the centerline location. More than 95% of the LiDAR-derived road was digitized within 1.3 m to the field surveyed normal. The proposed approach can provide thorough and accurate road inventory data to support forest management.
    Journal of Forestry Research 12/2014; 25(4).
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    ABSTRACT: Myeloblastosis (MYB) is one of the largest transcribed factor families in plants. To gain an overall picture of the evolution of MYB genes in relict plants, we cloned nine novel MYB genes in Taxodiaceae plants (Taxodium distichum, Taxodium ascendens, Cryptomeria japonica var. Sinensis, Cryptomeria japonica cv. Araucarioides, Cryptomer Japonica, Metasequoia glyptostroboides, Cunninghamia lanceolata, Taiwania cryptomerioides and Glyptostrobus pensilis). The deduced amino acid sequences for MYBs showed that the nine MYB proteins contained two DNA binding domains. The first domain is from amino acid position 29 to 78, wherein three tryptophanes at 33, 53 and 73 were separated by 19 amino acids, respectively. The second domain is from amino acid position 82 to 127, wherein three tryptophanes at 86, 105 and 124 were separated by 18 amino acids, respectively, whereas the first tryptophane at amino acid position 86 is replaced by a phenylalanine. The characterization of these conserved domains at nine MYBs indicated that they all belong to the R2R3-MYB group. The secondary structure analysis showed that α-helix and β-turn are the major motifs of the predicted secondary structure of MYBs. The three dimensional model of each MYB protein showed that the structure is like clip, making it more flexible and mobile. The similarities between the nine MYB proteins in Taxodiaceae were calculated. The highest identical value of 99% is between CjsMYB, CjMYB and CjaMYB, whereas the lowest value of 82% is between TaMYB and ClMYB. According to the phylogenetic tree, the distances between different genera were relatively large whereas those within genera were relatively small. As expected, accessions of the same genus formed a subgroup before being grouped with other genera.
    Journal of Forestry Research 12/2014; 25(4).
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    ABSTRACT: White-naped crane (Grus vipio) is a globally threatened species. It is very important to analyze its nest site selection in circumstances where there are multiple disturbances, and also helpful to accumulate valuable information about this threatened species and supply scientific suggestions for conservation and management. We studied nest site selection and the effects of environmental variables on nesting habits of white-naped crane at Zhalong National Nature Reserve, Qiqihar City, Heilongjiang, China, during March-May of 2002–2008. White-naped crane responded and adapted to changes in the quality of the spatial environments of landscape and microhabitat under multiple environmental disturbances. Nest site selection included two scales and two choices, namely the choice of nest site habitat type within the macro-habitat scale and nest site micro-habitat selection within the micro-habitat scale. Nest sites were recorded only in reed marshes. The choice of nest site micro-habitat included three basic elements and six factors, namely incubation element (nest parameters factor, incubation temperature factor and incubation humidity factor), safety element (protection factor and concealment factor), and food element (water factor). Water, remnant reed clusters, and fire were major resource management challenges during the breeding period for the white-naped crane in this Reserve.
    Journal of Forestry Research 12/2014; 25(4).
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    ABSTRACT: We investigated the effect of forest thinning on soil nitrogen mineralization, nitrification and transformation in a Cryptomeria japonica plantation at high elevation to provide basic data for forest management. We chose four study plots for control, light, medium and heavy thinning treatment, and three sub-plots for buried bag studies at similar elevations in each treatment plot to measure the net N mineralization and nitrification rates in situ. The contents of soil inorganic N (ammonium and nitrate) were similar between treatments, but all varied with season, reaching maxima in September 2003 and 2004. The seasonal maximum net Nmin rates after four treatments were 0.182, 0.246, 0.303 and 0.560 mg·kg−1·d−1 in 2003, and 0.242, 0.258, 0.411 and 0.671 mg·kg−1·d−1in 2004, respectively. These estimates are approximate with the lower annual rates of N mineralization for this region. Forest thinning can enhance net N mineralization and microbial biomass carbon. The percentage of annual rates of Nmin for different levels of forest thinning compared with the control plot were 13.4%, 59.8% and 154.2% in 2003, and 0.1%, 58.8% and 157.7% in 2004 for light, medium, and heavy thinning, respectively. These differences were related to soil moisture, temperature, precipitation, and soil and vegetation types. Well-planned multi-site comparisons, both located within Taiwan and the East-Asia region, could greatly improve our knowledge of regional patterns in nitrogen cycling.
    Journal of Forestry Research 09/2014; 25(3).
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    ABSTRACT: This study was designed to isolate endophytic fungi from A. mongholicus (growing in northeast China) to determine whether they can produce bioactive metabolites. Four strains of endophytic fungi (strains 16, 17, 23 and 75) were successfully isolated from A. mongholicus using the surface disinfection method. According to ITS-rDNA sequences analysis, strains 16 and 75 were identified as Fusarium oxysporum, and strains 17 and 23 were identified as Bionectria ochroleuca. We applied the Box-Behnken design (BBD) to optimize the liquid fermentation conditions and obtain the maximum cell dry weight (CDW) yield. Optimal parameters were obtained under the following experimental conditions: temperature of 28°C, potato dextrose agar (PDA) liquid medium of 80 mL and rotation speed of 150 rpm. The four isolated endophytic fungi did not produce astragalosides I–IV, flavonoids or polysaccharides. Isolation of additional species of endophytic fungi from A. mongholicus and determination of their capacity to produce biologically active substances are subjects in need of further research.
    Journal of Forestry Research 09/2014; 25(3).
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    ABSTRACT: We used silane coupling agents to improve the bonding ability between wheat straw particles and UF resin, and investigated surface properties (wettability and surface roughness) and hardness of particleboard made from UF-bonded wheat straw (Triticum aestivum L.) combined with poplar wood as affected by silane coupling agent content and straw/poplar wood particle ratios. We manufactured one-layered particleboard panels at four different ratios of straw to poplar wood particles (0%, 15%, 30% and 45% wheat straw) and silane coupling agent content at three levels of 0, 5% and 10%. Roughness measurements, average roughness (R a), mean peak-to-valley height (R z), and root mean square roughness (R q) were measured on unsanded samples by using a fine stylus tracing technique. We obtained contact angle measurements by using a goniometer connected to a digital camera and computer system. Boards containing greater amounts of poplar particles had superior hardness compared to control samples and had lower wettability. Panels made with higher amounts of silane had lower R q values.
    Journal of Forestry Research 09/2014; 25(3).
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    ABSTRACT: The current trend of forest management in many countries is reduced use of clear-felling and planting, and increased use of continuous cover management. In Finland, the new forest act of 2014 made all types of cuttings equally allowable on the condition that if the post-cutting residual stand basal area is too low, the stand must be regenerated within certain time frame. Forest landowner can freely choose between even- and uneven-aged management. This study developed a method for optimizing the timing and type of cuttings without the need to categorize the management system as either even-aged or uneven-aged. A management system that does not set any requirements on the sequence of post-cutting diameter distributions is called any-aged management. Planting or sowing was used when stand basal area fell below the required minimum basal area and the amount of advance regeneration was less than required in the regulations. When the cuttings of 200 stands managed earlier with even-aged silviculture were optimized with the developed system, final felling followed by artificial regeneration was selected for almost 50% of stands. Reduction of the minimum basal area limit greatly decreased the use of artificial regeneration but improved profitability, suggesting that the truly optimal management would be to use natural regeneration in financially mature stands. The optimal type of thinning was high thinning in 97–99 % of cases. It was calculated that the minimum basal area requirement reduced the mean net present value of the stands by 12–16 % when discount rate was 3–5 %.
    Journal of Forestry Research 09/2014; 25(3).
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    ABSTRACT: Forty-five species of wild edible fruits were identified and traditional local knowledge of their usage was recorded in 40 villages of Kodagu district in Central Western Ghats, India one of the eight top hotspots of biodiversity in the world. We combined biodiversity inventory of trees with village interviews to record traditional ecological knowledge. Wild edible fruits were an opportunistic source of food for rural people. Wild edible fruits were rich in minerals, vitamins, carbohydrates, proteins, fats and fiber. In recent years there has been a decline in numbers of wild fruit trees due to changes in land use from uncultivated private wooded area to cardamom and coffee cultivation. The availability of wild edible fruits that were once very common on private cultivated areas has declined and their distributions are now restricted more to jungles and wildlife sanctuaries. We propose methods for conservation and describe the need for sustainable utilization to provide supplementary sources of nutritional and pharmaceutically useful edible wild fruits.
    Journal of Forestry Research 09/2014; 25(3).
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    ABSTRACT: Understanding the age effect on soil carbon balance in forest ecosystems is important for other material cycles and forest management. In this research we investigated soil organic carbon density, litter production, litter decomposition rate, soil respiration, and soil microbial properties in a chronosequence of four Chinese fir plantations of 7, 16, 23 and 29 years at Dagangshan mountain range, Jiangxi Province, south China. There was a significant increasing trend in litter production with increasing plantation age. Litter decomposition rate and soil respiration, however, declined from the 7-year to the 16-year plantation, and then increased after 16 years. This was largely dependent on soil microorganisms. Soil carbon output was higher than carbon input before 16 years, and total soil carbon stock declined from 35.98 t·ha−1 in the 7-year plantation to 30.12 t·ha−1 in the 16-year plantation. Greater litter production could not explain the greater soil carbon stock, suggesting that forest growth impacted this microbial process that controlled rates of soil carbon balance together with litter and soil respiration. The results highlight the importance of the development stage in assessing soil carbon budget and its significance to future management of Chinese fir plantations.
    Journal of Forestry Research 09/2014; 25(3).
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    ABSTRACT: Litter production, decomposition and nutrient release dynamics of Ochlandra setigera, a rare endemic bamboo species of Nilgiri biosphere were studied during 2011–2012 using the standard litter bag technique. Annual litter production was 1.981 t·ha−1 and was continuous throughout the year with monthly variations. Litterfall followed a triphasic pattern with two major peaks in November, 2011 and January, 2012 and a minor peak in July, 2011. The rate of decomposition in O. setigera was a good fit to the exponential decay model of Olson (1963). Litter quality and climatic conditions of the study site (maximum temperature, monthly rainfall and relative humidity) influenced the rate of decomposition. Nutrient release from the decomposing litter mass was in rank order N = Mg > K = Ca > P. Nutrient release from litter was continuous and it was in synchrony with growth of new culms. Study of litter dynamics is needed before introduction of a bamboo species into degraded or marginal lands or Agroforestry systems.
    Journal of Forestry Research 09/2014; 25(3).