Journal of Forestry Research (J Forest Res )

Publisher: Dongbei lin ye da xue (China); Ecological Society of China, Springer Verlag

Description

The Journal of Forestry Research offers articles dealing with all aspects of forestry. It is primarily a medium for reporting original theoretical and experimental research, as well as technical reviews. Approximately 85 per cent of the papers published in the journal are by Chinese scientists, professors and doctoral degree students; the balance are contributed by researchers in other countries. Through 16 years of development and improvement, the Journal of Forestry Research has earned a reputation as an important international academic journal.

Impact factor 0.00

  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
    0.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.00
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.00
  • Website
    Journal of Forestry Research website
  • Other titles
    Journal of forestry research (Online), Ecosystem management, Lin ye yan jiu, JFR
  • ISSN
    1007-662X
  • OCLC
    67617801
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Springer Verlag

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Author's pre-print on pre-print servers such as arXiv.org
    • Author's post-print on author's personal website immediately
    • Author's post-print on any open access repository after 12 months after publication
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set phrase to accompany link to published version (see policy)
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Phellodendron amurense has been used for many years as a medical plant in traditional Chinese medicine and has shown great prospect in recent clinical trials for future applications. Berberine is an essential active compound contained in P. amurense. Our objective in this study was to quantify the content of berberine in P. amurense from sites at different elevations on Changbai Mountain. We collected samples of P. amurense from five different elevations on Changbai Mountain. Berberine in samples was extracted by ultrahigh pressure extraction (UPE). And the quantity was measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). First, the optimal HPLC conditions for berberine were identified with satisfactory precision (relative standard deviation, R SD R E R 2 = 0.9998) in the range of 6.576–328.8 mg·L−1. Second, the combination of UPE and HPLC methods in quantitative analysis of berberine showed high repeatability (R SD = 3.28 %), reproducibility (R SD = 4.72 %), stability (R SD HPLC method is simple, reliable and low-cost for quantitative analysis of berberine. Content of berberine in P. amurense varied significantly by site on Changbai Mountain.
    Journal of Forestry Research 01/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We evaluated the biomass and ergosterol content of Hericium erinaceus mycelium, and extracellular enzyme activities in H. erinaceus liquid culture following salicylic acid (SA) and methyl jasmonic acid (MeJA) supplementation. The optimal SA concentration was 100 µmol·L−1, where the highest ergosterol content of 2.33 mg·g−1 was obtained following 6-day cultivation with 100 µmol·L−1 SA supplementation, and which was significantly higher than the unsupplemented control (p −1 MeJA, the highest ergosterol content obtained was 1.988 mg·g−1, which was 25.8 % higher than the unsupplemented control. Our data indicate that SA and MeJA supplementation improves ergosterol content in H. erinaceus mycelium.
    Journal of Forestry Research 01/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We studied the effect of growth on wood anatomical dimensions and specific gravity of seed-raised plantation wood of Dalbergia sissoo with twelve trees of different diameters and similar ages. Fiber length ranged from 925 to 1,287 μm, fiber-diameter was 19–23 μm, wall thickness was 4.2–5.4 μm, vessel-element-length was 152–188 μm, vessel-element-diameter was 152–200 μm, and specific gravity was 0.59–0.72. Growth parameters including tree height, diameter at breast height, net primary productivity and net ecosystem productivity were significantly and positively correlated. Growth parameters showed non-significant positive relationships with fiber-length, fiber diameter, wall thickness, vessel element length, and vessel element diameter. The trend of wood traits increased with growth. Specific gravity showed non-significant negative relationships with growth parameters. Although the growth rate had varied relationships with wood properties, as reported by various workers, the wood element dimensions showed no significant relationship with growth parameters and there was little effect of growth rate on wood traits in seed-raised plantation of D. sissoo.
    Journal of Forestry Research 01/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We quantified morphological and hydrographical characteristics of two drainage basins (Chanioti and N. Skioni) on Cassandra peninsula of Chalkidiki (North Greece), and evaluated the effectiveness of post-fire flood and erosion control works. The drainage basins were chosen because of their severe damage by fire, post-fire potential for erosion and flood due to the steep relief, and the importance of the area for residential and tourism development. The first measures taken in the area after the fire were salvage cutting of burned trees, a total ban on grazing, and construction of three types of works, log erosion barriers (LEBs), log check dams and contour branch barriers. Almost all necessary post-fire works were completed in both catchments but many construction failures were recorded. Approximately 75 % of the LEBs and 45 % of the contour branch barriers functioned properly, while the remainder failed. Nearly 80 % of the log dams were sedimented to 0–20 % of the dam height, 14.3 % were 20–40 % filled and 5.9 % collapsed. Despite these failures, peak discharge declined by 10.5 % in Chanioti and 20.4 % in N. Skioni catchment. The main reasons for works failures were the rush of construction and the limited supervision of workers, which resulted in floods during the years that followed.
    Journal of Forestry Research 01/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Species of Paulownia are fast-growing trees that are planted in many countries in green spaces and agroforestry systems. We studied the influence of irrigation on the diameter growth of 2-year-old Paulownia tomentosa saplings planted in 3 m × 3 m grids at Nazlou Campus of Urmia University, Iran. Completely randomized experimental design was used with four irrigation amount, viz. 10, 15, 20 and 25 L, and three irrigation intervals, viz. 3- and 6-days, in 8 replications. During the growth season, we measured collar diameters of all saplings at the end of each month. Diameter growth declined with reduced irrigation amount and increased irrigation interval. The lowest average diameter growth (9 mm) was recorded for 10 L water at 6-day intervals and maximum average diameter growth (28.7 mm) was recorded for 25 L volume at 3-day intervals. The latter treatment resulted in significantly greater diameter growth than any other treatment (except 20 L at 3-day intervals). More than 80 % of diameter growth was achieved in the first 3 months. Therefore, it is essential to irrigate with 25 L of water at 3-day intervals during the first three growth months to achieve maximum diameter growth for 2-year-old P. tomentosa saplings.
    Journal of Forestry Research 01/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In Boswellia papyrifera (Del.) Hochst natural stands, we studied the association of parasitic plants with B. papyrifera trees from which frankincense was tapped and marketed for domestic and export markets. Data on the rate of infection of parasitic plants on B. papyrifera was collected in three transects located at separate locations around Baha kar, northern Ethiopia. Each transect had ten circular sample plots of 400 m2 and separated by 100 m. Species composition, DBH, height, crown diameter, number of main, secondary and tertiary branches and number of parasitic plants on individual trees were recorded. Sixteen tree species were recorded in the combined sample plots. The parasitic plant associated with B. papyrifera was identified as Tapinanthus globiferus. This parasite infected 38% of Boswellia trees in sample plots. The infection rate of the parasitic plant varied from 1 to 33 per Boswellia tree. The infection of T. globiferus on B. papyrifera was predominantly limited to tertiary small branchlets arising from secondary branches; parasitic plants were absent on thick main and secondary branches. In all plots, infection of T. globiferus was exclusively limited to Boswellia trees. The influence of T. globiferus parasitism on growth of Boswellia trees and its influence on yield of incense production needs further investigation. Management of natural stands for frankincense production should include measures to reduce infection by T. globiferus.
    Journal of Forestry Research 12/2014; 25(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Farmers in the highlands of Ethiopia often plant Eucalyptus on their farmlands. However, growing Eucalyptus, especially on farmlands suitable for crop production has become a great concern due to its alleged long-term site effects. Our study was conducted at Koga watershed, Mecha District, northwestern Ethiopia to investigate whether croplands afforested with Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehnh. can be restored for annual crop production after tree harvest. We compared growth and yield of two agricultural crops, barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and finger millet (Eleusine coracana (L.) Gaertn.), grown in clear-felled stands of E. camaldulensis and continuously cultivated croplands at twelve paired farmlands under a conventional farming system. Plant height and dry matter production were evaluated as indices of crop growth, while grain weight was evaluated as an index of crop yield. Crop growth and yield measurements averaged over all farmlands differed between land-use types. For both crops, plants grown on clear-felled stands were taller than on croplands. Dry matter production and yield were also significantly greater in crops cultivated on clear-felled stands. Cropland aboveground and belowground dry matter productions were lower by 31.8 and 25.4% for barley and 32.8% and 37% for finger millet, respectively. Clear-felled stands gave an average yield of 2.91 t·ha−1 for barley and 3.27 t·ha−1 for finger millet while cropland gave a yield of 1.97 and 2.31 t·ha−1 for barley and finger millet, respectively. Farmers also responded that farm plots on former eucalypt plantations showed greater crop growth and yield than did continuously cultivated croplands. Farmers perceived that Eucalyptus plantations improved soil fertility and they preferred clear-felled stands for crop production and wished to plant Eucalyptus on their farmlands. Our results suggest that conversion of agricultural lands to Eucalyptus plantations can increase post-felling yields of cereal crops.
    Journal of Forestry Research 12/2014; 25(4).
  • Journal of Forestry Research 12/2014; 25(4):915-921.
  • Journal of Forestry Research 12/2014; 25(4):981-984.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Deforestation occurs at an alarming rate in upland watersheds of Bangladesh and has many detrimental effects on the environment. This study reports the effects of deforestation on soil biological properties along with some important physicochemical parameters of a southern upland watershed in Bangladesh. Soils were sampled at 4 paired sites, each pair representing a deforested site and a forested site, and having similar topographical characteristics. Significantly fewer (p≤0.001) fungi and bacteria, and lower microbial respiration, active microbial biomass, metabolic and microbial quotients were found in soils of the deforested sites. Soil physical properties such as moisture content, water holding capacity, and chemical properties such as organic matter, total N, available P and EC were also lower in deforested soils. Bulk density and pH were significantly higher in deforested soils. Available Ca and Mg were inconsistent between the two land uses at all the paired sites. Reduced abundance and biomass of soil mesofauna were recorded in deforested soils. However, soil anecic species were more abundant in deforested soils than epigeic and endogeic species, which were more abundant in forested soils than on deforested sites.
    Journal of Forestry Research 12/2014; 25(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: White-naped crane (Grus vipio) is a globally threatened species. It is very important to analyze its nest site selection in circumstances where there are multiple disturbances, and also helpful to accumulate valuable information about this threatened species and supply scientific suggestions for conservation and management. We studied nest site selection and the effects of environmental variables on nesting habits of white-naped crane at Zhalong National Nature Reserve, Qiqihar City, Heilongjiang, China, during March-May of 2002–2008. White-naped crane responded and adapted to changes in the quality of the spatial environments of landscape and microhabitat under multiple environmental disturbances. Nest site selection included two scales and two choices, namely the choice of nest site habitat type within the macro-habitat scale and nest site micro-habitat selection within the micro-habitat scale. Nest sites were recorded only in reed marshes. The choice of nest site micro-habitat included three basic elements and six factors, namely incubation element (nest parameters factor, incubation temperature factor and incubation humidity factor), safety element (protection factor and concealment factor), and food element (water factor). Water, remnant reed clusters, and fire were major resource management challenges during the breeding period for the white-naped crane in this Reserve.
    Journal of Forestry Research 12/2014; 25(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Myeloblastosis (MYB) is one of the largest transcribed factor families in plants. To gain an overall picture of the evolution of MYB genes in relict plants, we cloned nine novel MYB genes in Taxodiaceae plants (Taxodium distichum, Taxodium ascendens, Cryptomeria japonica var. Sinensis, Cryptomeria japonica cv. Araucarioides, Cryptomer Japonica, Metasequoia glyptostroboides, Cunninghamia lanceolata, Taiwania cryptomerioides and Glyptostrobus pensilis). The deduced amino acid sequences for MYBs showed that the nine MYB proteins contained two DNA binding domains. The first domain is from amino acid position 29 to 78, wherein three tryptophanes at 33, 53 and 73 were separated by 19 amino acids, respectively. The second domain is from amino acid position 82 to 127, wherein three tryptophanes at 86, 105 and 124 were separated by 18 amino acids, respectively, whereas the first tryptophane at amino acid position 86 is replaced by a phenylalanine. The characterization of these conserved domains at nine MYBs indicated that they all belong to the R2R3-MYB group. The secondary structure analysis showed that α-helix and β-turn are the major motifs of the predicted secondary structure of MYBs. The three dimensional model of each MYB protein showed that the structure is like clip, making it more flexible and mobile. The similarities between the nine MYB proteins in Taxodiaceae were calculated. The highest identical value of 99% is between CjsMYB, CjMYB and CjaMYB, whereas the lowest value of 82% is between TaMYB and ClMYB. According to the phylogenetic tree, the distances between different genera were relatively large whereas those within genera were relatively small. As expected, accessions of the same genus formed a subgroup before being grouped with other genera.
    Journal of Forestry Research 12/2014; 25(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study was designed to isolate endophytic fungi from A. mongholicus (growing in northeast China) to determine whether they can produce bioactive metabolites. Four strains of endophytic fungi (strains 16, 17, 23 and 75) were successfully isolated from A. mongholicus using the surface disinfection method. According to ITS-rDNA sequences analysis, strains 16 and 75 were identified as Fusarium oxysporum, and strains 17 and 23 were identified as Bionectria ochroleuca. We applied the Box-Behnken design (BBD) to optimize the liquid fermentation conditions and obtain the maximum cell dry weight (CDW) yield. Optimal parameters were obtained under the following experimental conditions: temperature of 28°C, potato dextrose agar (PDA) liquid medium of 80 mL and rotation speed of 150 rpm. The four isolated endophytic fungi did not produce astragalosides I–IV, flavonoids or polysaccharides. Isolation of additional species of endophytic fungi from A. mongholicus and determination of their capacity to produce biologically active substances are subjects in need of further research.
    Journal of Forestry Research 09/2014; 25(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We investigated the effect of forest thinning on soil nitrogen mineralization, nitrification and transformation in a Cryptomeria japonica plantation at high elevation to provide basic data for forest management. We chose four study plots for control, light, medium and heavy thinning treatment, and three sub-plots for buried bag studies at similar elevations in each treatment plot to measure the net N mineralization and nitrification rates in situ. The contents of soil inorganic N (ammonium and nitrate) were similar between treatments, but all varied with season, reaching maxima in September 2003 and 2004. The seasonal maximum net Nmin rates after four treatments were 0.182, 0.246, 0.303 and 0.560 mg·kg−1·d−1 in 2003, and 0.242, 0.258, 0.411 and 0.671 mg·kg−1·d−1in 2004, respectively. These estimates are approximate with the lower annual rates of N mineralization for this region. Forest thinning can enhance net N mineralization and microbial biomass carbon. The percentage of annual rates of Nmin for different levels of forest thinning compared with the control plot were 13.4%, 59.8% and 154.2% in 2003, and 0.1%, 58.8% and 157.7% in 2004 for light, medium, and heavy thinning, respectively. These differences were related to soil moisture, temperature, precipitation, and soil and vegetation types. Well-planned multi-site comparisons, both located within Taiwan and the East-Asia region, could greatly improve our knowledge of regional patterns in nitrogen cycling.
    Journal of Forestry Research 09/2014; 25(3).