Journal of Forestry Research (J Forest Res )

Publisher: Dongbei lin ye da xue (China); Ecological Society of China, Springer Verlag

Description

The Journal of Forestry Research offers articles dealing with all aspects of forestry. It is primarily a medium for reporting original theoretical and experimental research, as well as technical reviews. Approximately 85 per cent of the papers published in the journal are by Chinese scientists, professors and doctoral degree students; the balance are contributed by researchers in other countries. Through 16 years of development and improvement, the Journal of Forestry Research has earned a reputation as an important international academic journal.

  • Impact factor
    0.00
  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
    0.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.00
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
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  • Website
    Journal of Forestry Research website
  • Other titles
    Journal of forestry research (Online), Ecosystem management, Lin ye yan jiu, JFR
  • ISSN
    1007-662X
  • OCLC
    67617801
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Springer Verlag

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Authors own final version only can be archived
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On author's website or institutional repository
    • On funders designated website/repository after 12 months at the funders request or as a result of legal obligation
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set phrase to accompany link to published version (The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com)
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We investigated the effect of fire disturbance on short-term soil respiration in birch (Betula platyphylla Suk.) and larch (Larix gmelinii Rupr.) forests in Greater Xing’an range, northeastern China for further understanding of its effect on the carbon cycle in ecosystems. Our study show that post-fire soil respiration rates in B. platyphylla and L. gmelinii forests were reduced by 14% and 10%, respectively. In contrast, the soil heterotrophic respiration rates in the two types of forest were similar in post-fire and control plots. After fire, the contribution of root respiration to total soil respiration was dramatically reduced. Variation in soil respiration rates was explained by soil moisture (W) and soil temperature (T) at a depth of 5 cm. Exponential regression fitted T and W models explained Rs rates in B. platyphylla control and post-fire plots (83.1% and 86.2%) and L. gmelinii control and post-fire plots (83.7% and 88.7%). In addition, the short-term temperature coefficients in B. platyphylla control and post-fire plots were 5.33 and 5, respectively, and 9.12, and 5.26 in L. gmelinii control and post-fire plots, respectively. Our results provide an empirical baseline for studying the effect of fire disturbance on soil carbon balance and estimation of soil carbon flux in boreal forest.
    Journal of Forestry Research 09/2014; 25(3).
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    ABSTRACT: In this study, we report Monopis crocicapitella (Clemens, 1859) (Tineidae), which was collected from bat guano in a cave in the southern region of Korea, for the first time from East Asia. We briefly redescribe and illustrate the external morphology and genital structures of both sexes. Also, we discuss the local habitat characteristics and some of the ecological information that was observed during our field investigation.
    Journal of Forestry Research 09/2014; 25(3).
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    ABSTRACT: 1Xylotrechus rusticus (Linnaeus) is one of the most destructive woodborers in northeast China; it damages poplar and is listed as a domestic forestry quarantine pest. Overwintering larvae were collected during October 2012 and March 2013 in Harbin, China, to quantify indicators related to the insect’s overwintering strategy and the major cryoprotectants. The supercooling points (SCPs), which ranged from −14.7°C to −2.9°C, were higher than the lethal temperatures of LT50 (−33.64°C) and LT99 (−40.17°C) after 24 h exposure., also the minimum mean daily temperature (−24.5°C) and mean monthly temperature (−18.0°C) at the sampling site in January during 2008–2012. Thus, X. rusticus is a typical freezing-tolerant insect. Glycerol serves as a major cryoprotectant for overwintering larvae, because it was the only polyol accumulated during the winter and it also had a significant negative correlation with the SCP (p= 0.033, R =0.907). The glycogen and lipid are major sources of energy and their levels decreased substantially in the middle of overwintering, when glycogen had a significant correlation with the SCP (p= 0.006, R =0.971) whereas the lipid contents did not. Moreover, inter-conversions between glycerol and glycogen, as well as mannose and glycogen, were suggested by their negative correlations. The water content did not change obviously during the winter and was not correlated with the SCP. The free amino acids in the hemolymph and the total protein contents of the bodies of larvae changed significantly during winter, although both had no correlations with the SCP.
    Journal of Forestry Research 09/2014; 25(3).
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    ABSTRACT: We investigated the effect of forest thinning on soil nitrogen mineralization, nitrification and transformation in a Cryptomeria japonica plantation at high elevation to provide basic data for forest management. We chose four study plots for control, light, medium and heavy thinning treatment, and three sub-plots for buried bag studies at similar elevations in each treatment plot to measure the net N mineralization and nitrification rates in situ. The contents of soil inorganic N (ammonium and nitrate) were similar between treatments, but all varied with season, reaching maxima in September 2003 and 2004. The seasonal maximum net Nmin rates after four treatments were 0.182, 0.246, 0.303 and 0.560 mg·kg−1·d−1 in 2003, and 0.242, 0.258, 0.411 and 0.671 mg·kg−1·d−1in 2004, respectively. These estimates are approximate with the lower annual rates of N mineralization for this region. Forest thinning can enhance net N mineralization and microbial biomass carbon. The percentage of annual rates of Nmin for different levels of forest thinning compared with the control plot were 13.4%, 59.8% and 154.2% in 2003, and 0.1%, 58.8% and 157.7% in 2004 for light, medium, and heavy thinning, respectively. These differences were related to soil moisture, temperature, precipitation, and soil and vegetation types. Well-planned multi-site comparisons, both located within Taiwan and the East-Asia region, could greatly improve our knowledge of regional patterns in nitrogen cycling.
    Journal of Forestry Research 09/2014; 25(3).
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    ABSTRACT: This study was designed to isolate endophytic fungi from A. mongholicus (growing in northeast China) to determine whether they can produce bioactive metabolites. Four strains of endophytic fungi (strains 16, 17, 23 and 75) were successfully isolated from A. mongholicus using the surface disinfection method. According to ITS-rDNA sequences analysis, strains 16 and 75 were identified as Fusarium oxysporum, and strains 17 and 23 were identified as Bionectria ochroleuca. We applied the Box-Behnken design (BBD) to optimize the liquid fermentation conditions and obtain the maximum cell dry weight (CDW) yield. Optimal parameters were obtained under the following experimental conditions: temperature of 28°C, potato dextrose agar (PDA) liquid medium of 80 mL and rotation speed of 150 rpm. The four isolated endophytic fungi did not produce astragalosides I–IV, flavonoids or polysaccharides. Isolation of additional species of endophytic fungi from A. mongholicus and determination of their capacity to produce biologically active substances are subjects in need of further research.
    Journal of Forestry Research 09/2014; 25(3).
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    ABSTRACT: We used acoustic tests on a quarter-sawn poplar timbers to study the effects of wood anisotropy and cavity defects on acoustic wave velocity and travel path, and we investigated acoustic wave propagation behavior in wood. The timber specimens were first tested in unmodified condition and then tested after introduction of cavity defects of varying sizes to quantify the transmitting time of acoustic waves in laboratory conditions. Two-dimensional acoustic wave contour maps on the radial section of specimens were then simulated and analyzed based on the experimental data. We tested the relationship between wood grain and acoustic wave velocity as waves passed in various directions through wood. Wood anisotropy has significant effects on both velocity and travel path of acoustic waves, and the velocity of waves passing longitudinally through timbers exceeded the radial velocity. Moreover, cavity defects altered acoustic wave time contours on radial sections of timbers. Acoustic wave transits from an excitation point to the region behind a cavity in defective wood more slowly than in intact wood.
    Journal of Forestry Research 09/2014; 25(3).
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    ABSTRACT: A total of 3611 fungal isolates were recovered from 4200 leaf segments incubated from 7 medicinal herbs during monsoon, winter and summer seasons. These fungal isolates belonged to teleomorphic Ascomycota (23.5%), anamorphic Ascomycota producing conidiomata (17.4%), anamorphic Ascomycota without conidiomata (46.9%), Zygomycota (1.42%) and sterile forms (10.6%). Chaetomium globosum, Aspergillus niger, Aureobasidium pullulans, Curvularia lunata, Fusarium spp., Penicillium spp., Pestalotiopsis spp., Trichoderma viridae, Cladosporium cladosporioides, were frequently isolated from more than one host plant. The number of endophytic isolates was higher in winter than in monsoon and summer seasons.
    Journal of Forestry Research 09/2014; 25(3).
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    ABSTRACT: Guggal, a threatened species that is endemic to western India, is tapped to extract medicinally important oleo-gum-resin (guggul). However, the plant dies after gum exudation. The indigenous tapping techniques used by local people were examined in Gujarat, India to discover the scientific basis behind these techniques: selection of gum inducer, season of tapping, and plant parts to be tapped. First, the presence of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. commiphorae (Xac) in the gum suspension used for tapping was established. This bacterium induces gum oozing from the tapped plants and later, causes them to die off. The population of Xac in gum was found to decrease with the age of the gum. With that, fresh gum increased the tapping success. Second, local people preferred tapping during the warm season, which we validated by determining that Xac growth was best at 30 °C. Tapping during September (mean temperature 25.7–30 °C) clearly favoured growth of the pathogen and yielded maximum guggul. Multiple tapping on a mature tree ensured maximum gum extraction before its death. Finally, application of indigenous technology under natural plant stands by the local people ensured availability of this important raw drug for consumption. Our study established that the age-old traditional methods have a strong scientific basis. However, it is imperative to formulate strategies based on contemporary scientific understanding to protect this natural resource before it becomes extinct.
    Journal of Forestry Research 09/2014; 25(3).
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    ABSTRACT: Siberian Pine (Pinus sibirica) is an ecologically and economically important species in pristine forests throughout northern Russia. Four provenances of P. sibirica were introduced from Mongolia and Russia to the Greater Xing’an Range (the Daxing’anling), northeast China in 1993. The aim of this research was to study genetic variation and selection of the introduced four Pinus sibirica provenances. Heights (H), basal diameters (BD), survival rates (SR) and crown lengths (CL) of different families were measured as primary outcomes in different growth years. Results of data analyses demonstrated high coefficients of phenotypic variation (PCV) and heritability (H 2) for H, BD and CL at 18 years after introduction. PCV and H 2 increased with age. Correlations of growth traits between any two growth years were all significantly positive, but the correlation coefficient was smaller when the growth year interval was larger. Correlations between H and the original environment factors decreased gradually, indicating that with long-term subsistence in the new environment, the influence of the source environment declined. Colligation of multiple traits to estimate provenances showed that Novosibirsk, Tomsk, and Altai Mountains had higher survival rates and biomass, and proved more suitable for introduction and plantation in the Greater Xing’an Range in China.
    Journal of Forestry Research 09/2014; 25(3).
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    ABSTRACT: We quantified species diversity of birds in mangroves at Kundapura from April-2010 to March-2013. We recorded 79 species of 36 families and 14 orders. Of these 71% are resident species, 22% are residential migrants and 8% are migratory. One endangered species, three near threatened species, and a few occasional visitors were recorded. Species diversity and abundance of birds were greater during from October through May as there was availability of food, increased vegetation and the arrival of migratory birds. Minimum diversity was recorded from June through September owing to heavy rains, increased flow of water, limited availability of food and return of migratory birds.
    Journal of Forestry Research 09/2014; 25(3).
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    ABSTRACT: We collected soil samples from two representative sites at Aatmile of Khagarachari hill district in Chittagong Hill Tracts. One of the sites was under shifting cultivation and the other an adjacent 13-year old teak plantation. Both sites were in the same physiographic condition and same aspect with parable soil type, which enabled us to measure the effects of shifting cultivation on soil micro-flora. We studied soil physicochemical properties and the biochemical and biological properties of soil microbes. Moisture and organic matter content as well as fungi and bacterial populations, both in surface and subsurface soils, were significantly (p ≤0.001) lower in shifting cultivated soils compared to soils not under shifting cultivation, i.e. the teak plantation site. The most abundant bacteria in surface (0–10 cm) and sub-surface (10–20 cm) soils under shifting cultivation were Pseudomonas diminuta and Shigella, respectively, while in corresponding soil layers of teak plantation, predominant microbes were Bacillus firmus (0–10 cm) and Xanthomonas (10–20 cm). The microbial population differences cannot be explained by soil texture differences because of the textural similarity in soils from the two sites but could be related to the significantly lower moisture and organic matter contents in soils under shifting cultivation.
    Journal of Forestry Research 09/2014; 25(3).
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    ABSTRACT: We used silane coupling agents to improve the bonding ability between wheat straw particles and UF resin, and investigated surface properties (wettability and surface roughness) and hardness of particleboard made from UF-bonded wheat straw (Triticum aestivum L.) combined with poplar wood as affected by silane coupling agent content and straw/poplar wood particle ratios. We manufactured one-layered particleboard panels at four different ratios of straw to poplar wood particles (0%, 15%, 30% and 45% wheat straw) and silane coupling agent content at three levels of 0, 5% and 10%. Roughness measurements, average roughness (R a), mean peak-to-valley height (R z), and root mean square roughness (R q) were measured on unsanded samples by using a fine stylus tracing technique. We obtained contact angle measurements by using a goniometer connected to a digital camera and computer system. Boards containing greater amounts of poplar particles had superior hardness compared to control samples and had lower wettability. Panels made with higher amounts of silane had lower R q values.
    Journal of Forestry Research 09/2014; 25(3).
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    ABSTRACT: The current trend of forest management in many countries is reduced use of clear-felling and planting, and increased use of continuous cover management. In Finland, the new forest act of 2014 made all types of cuttings equally allowable on the condition that if the post-cutting residual stand basal area is too low, the stand must be regenerated within certain time frame. Forest landowner can freely choose between even- and uneven-aged management. This study developed a method for optimizing the timing and type of cuttings without the need to categorize the management system as either even-aged or uneven-aged. A management system that does not set any requirements on the sequence of post-cutting diameter distributions is called any-aged management. Planting or sowing was used when stand basal area fell below the required minimum basal area and the amount of advance regeneration was less than required in the regulations. When the cuttings of 200 stands managed earlier with even-aged silviculture were optimized with the developed system, final felling followed by artificial regeneration was selected for almost 50% of stands. Reduction of the minimum basal area limit greatly decreased the use of artificial regeneration but improved profitability, suggesting that the truly optimal management would be to use natural regeneration in financially mature stands. The optimal type of thinning was high thinning in 97–99 % of cases. It was calculated that the minimum basal area requirement reduced the mean net present value of the stands by 12–16 % when discount rate was 3–5 %.
    Journal of Forestry Research 09/2014; 25(3).
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    ABSTRACT: Forty-five species of wild edible fruits were identified and traditional local knowledge of their usage was recorded in 40 villages of Kodagu district in Central Western Ghats, India one of the eight top hotspots of biodiversity in the world. We combined biodiversity inventory of trees with village interviews to record traditional ecological knowledge. Wild edible fruits were an opportunistic source of food for rural people. Wild edible fruits were rich in minerals, vitamins, carbohydrates, proteins, fats and fiber. In recent years there has been a decline in numbers of wild fruit trees due to changes in land use from uncultivated private wooded area to cardamom and coffee cultivation. The availability of wild edible fruits that were once very common on private cultivated areas has declined and their distributions are now restricted more to jungles and wildlife sanctuaries. We propose methods for conservation and describe the need for sustainable utilization to provide supplementary sources of nutritional and pharmaceutically useful edible wild fruits.
    Journal of Forestry Research 09/2014; 25(3).
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    ABSTRACT: Understanding the age effect on soil carbon balance in forest ecosystems is important for other material cycles and forest management. In this research we investigated soil organic carbon density, litter production, litter decomposition rate, soil respiration, and soil microbial properties in a chronosequence of four Chinese fir plantations of 7, 16, 23 and 29 years at Dagangshan mountain range, Jiangxi Province, south China. There was a significant increasing trend in litter production with increasing plantation age. Litter decomposition rate and soil respiration, however, declined from the 7-year to the 16-year plantation, and then increased after 16 years. This was largely dependent on soil microorganisms. Soil carbon output was higher than carbon input before 16 years, and total soil carbon stock declined from 35.98 t·ha−1 in the 7-year plantation to 30.12 t·ha−1 in the 16-year plantation. Greater litter production could not explain the greater soil carbon stock, suggesting that forest growth impacted this microbial process that controlled rates of soil carbon balance together with litter and soil respiration. The results highlight the importance of the development stage in assessing soil carbon budget and its significance to future management of Chinese fir plantations.
    Journal of Forestry Research 09/2014; 25(3).
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    ABSTRACT: Litter production, decomposition and nutrient release dynamics of Ochlandra setigera, a rare endemic bamboo species of Nilgiri biosphere were studied during 2011–2012 using the standard litter bag technique. Annual litter production was 1.981 t·ha−1 and was continuous throughout the year with monthly variations. Litterfall followed a triphasic pattern with two major peaks in November, 2011 and January, 2012 and a minor peak in July, 2011. The rate of decomposition in O. setigera was a good fit to the exponential decay model of Olson (1963). Litter quality and climatic conditions of the study site (maximum temperature, monthly rainfall and relative humidity) influenced the rate of decomposition. Nutrient release from the decomposing litter mass was in rank order N = Mg > K = Ca > P. Nutrient release from litter was continuous and it was in synchrony with growth of new culms. Study of litter dynamics is needed before introduction of a bamboo species into degraded or marginal lands or Agroforestry systems.
    Journal of Forestry Research 09/2014; 25(3).