Journal of human ecology (Delhi, India) (J Hum Ecol )

Description

The Journal of Human Ecology (J. Hum. Ecol.) is a peer reviewed, internationally circulated journal. It publishes reports of original research, theoretical articles and timely reviews, and brief communications in the interdisciplinary field of Human Ecology. The Journal serves as a forum for social and life scientists and health professionals. Especially those who share common interests in understanding Man-Environment Relationship. Reviews of books and other publications relevant to Human Ecology are also published.

  • Impact factor
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  • 5-year impact
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  • Cited half-life
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  • Immediacy index
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  • Eigenfactor
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  • Article influence
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  • Website
    Journal of Human Ecology website
  • ISSN
    0970-9274
  • OCLC
    174883802
  • Material type
    Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The present study investigated the level of stakeholders’ participation to find out how relationships are maintained among the beneficiaries of Comprehensive Rural Development Programme (CRDP). A simple purposive random sampling technique was used to select 300 respondents from the various CRDP projects for semi-structured questionnaires. The stakeholders’ participation index was developed that displays the participation is high in benefit sharing (PI= 0.6) but low in other key areas of study. Participation in council of stakeholders interaction was the least (PI= 0.1). The mean age was 35.5 years and the mean income level was R1000. The beneficiaries were food secured since they reported an increased food production change 45.5% and increased food consumption change 45.9%. Policy makers should involve the stakeholders in project designing and implementation as early as possible to give equal attention to perspectives.
    Journal of human ecology (Delhi, India) 11/2014; 48(2):321-328.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Using the Mafwe ethnic/cultural group as a test case, the situation in post-colonial Namibia can be interpreted to mean that as long as indigenous knowledge remains outside the official school curriculum, ideologically, ‘power’ continues to elude the people in the country which for over a century had been under the control of various Western colonial powers. It is suggested that there is an urgent need for Namibia to adopt a diverse culturally sensitive form of education which firmly embeds indigenous knowledge in the way the curriculum is conceptualised, designed and delivered. The study used methodologies such as conceptual analysis, oral traditions and phenomenological analysis. The overall findings in the study suggest the need for a comprehensive theory regarding how indigenous knowledge can become the bedrock and not merely an ancillary to a modern education in Namibia. The emphasis here is that learning about indigenous knowledge enables children and the communities they represent to feel authentic, respected and connected.
    Journal of human ecology (Delhi, India) 10/2014; 48(1):115-122.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper investigated the significant socio-economic characteristics that contributed to differences in attitudes towards environmental degradation among rural farming communities. The population in this study was farmers in rural areas of the Limpopo Province of South Africa. In all, 396 farmers constituted the cohort for the study. Since it was not possible to collect data from all farmers in the province, a simple random sampling method was used in the study. Positive and significant association with environmental degradation was found among farmers with high levels of education, years of farming and household size. It was recommended that since educated farmers in rural farming communities are most likely to understand the detrimental effects of environmental degradation, they should be targeted in research on environmental degradation.
    Journal of human ecology (Delhi, India) 04/2014; 46(1):47-54.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper investigated the significant socio-economic characteristics that contributed to differences in attitudes towards environmental degradation among rural farming communities. The population in this study was farmers in rural areas of the Limpopo Province of South Africa. In all, 396 farmers constituted the cohort for the study. Since it was not possible to collect data from all farmers in the province, a simple random sampling method was used in the study. Positive and significant association with environmental degradation was found among farmers with high levels of education, years of farming and household size. It was recommended that since educated farmers in rural farming communities are most likely to understand the detrimental effects of environmental degradation, they should be targeted in research on environmental degradation.
    Journal of human ecology (Delhi, India) 04/2014; 46(1):47-54.
  • Journal of human ecology (Delhi, India) 01/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: After a cigarette has been smoked in a limited area and that the smoke has dissipated, people, especially passive smokers sometime have the visual illusion that smoke particles and particulate matters have gone and that the danger to the health and lungs has ended. In this paper, a theoretical approach is used to investigate the quantitative and qualitative effects of smoke particulate matters, transported and spreading in a limited region. The researcher proves mathematically that tobacco smoke and its toxic chemicals remain in a house’s room or public place where they have been released. Transport and break-up processes of atmospheric particulate maters do not removed them but only change the distribution of the particulates in the room’s atmosphere, hereby addressing the problem of people exposed to second-hand tobacco smoke in our homes and work places.
    Journal of human ecology (Delhi, India) 01/2014; 47(1):1-5.
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    ABSTRACT: Small scale agriculture is a key land based activity for rural women, yet they own very little land. Rural land access is mediated by patrilineal customary law where women have mostly secondary property rights as wives. Consequently their land use security was derived from the family and other means of fostering accountability. As these have been lost with the developments in customary law, what is the source of women’s land use security? Three communities in Limpopo Province were selected purposively; data was collected using a questionnaire, focus group discussions, key informant interviews and observation. Data analysis was through descriptive analyses and content analysis. The results show gendered access land access and secure access for mostly married women. In spite of their insecurities, women are motivated to farm for household consumption. A framework that recognises women as land users and rural development is essential to strengthen women’s land use security.
    Journal of human ecology (Delhi, India) 01/2014; 46(2):205-221.
  • Journal of human ecology (Delhi, India) 12/2013; 44(3):305-311.
  • Journal of human ecology (Delhi, India) 10/2013; 44(1):9 - 21.
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    ABSTRACT: The study sought to identify the long term plans of graduating physiotherapy students from a Nigerian university. Eighty-four graduating students participated in this study. Sample of convenience was used to recruit participants in this study. A structured three- part questionnaire was used to collect data which was analysed with descriptive statistics. Some important patterns of long term practice preference among graduating students of physiotherapy were identified. The issue of brain drain as one of the challenges that the profession is facing was disproved by participants.
    Journal of human ecology (Delhi, India) 06/2013; 44(2):203-206.