Transportation Research Part A Policy and Practice Journal Impact Factor & Information

Publisher: Elsevier

Journal description

Transportation Research: Part A contains papers of general interest in all passenger and freight transportation modes: policy analysis, formulation and evaluation; planning; interaction with the political, socioeconomic and physical environment; design, management and evaluation of transportation systems. Topics are approached from any discipline or perspective: economics, engineering, sociology, psychology, etc. Case studies, survey and expository papers are included, as are articles which contribute to unification of the field, or to an understanding of the comparative aspects of different systems. Papers which assess the scope for technological innovation within a social or political framework are also published. The journal is international, and places equal emphasis on the problems of industrialized and non-industrialized regions. Part A's aims and scope are complementary to Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Part C: Emerging Technologies and Part D: Transport and Environment. The complete set forms the most cohesive and comprehensive reference of current research in transportation science. Selected abstracts from the Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice are available in TR Update, the Elsevier Science transportation newsletter.

Current impact factor: 2.73

Impact Factor Rankings

2015 Impact Factor Available summer 2015
2012 Impact Factor 2.725
2011 Impact Factor 2.354
2010 Impact Factor 1.601
2009 Impact Factor 1.715
2008 Impact Factor 1.832
2007 Impact Factor 1.352
2006 Impact Factor 1.634
2005 Impact Factor 0.646
2004 Impact Factor 0.73
2003 Impact Factor 0.792
2002 Impact Factor 0.868
2001 Impact Factor 0.531
2000 Impact Factor 0.28
1999 Impact Factor 0.319
1998 Impact Factor 0.582
1997 Impact Factor 0.474
1996 Impact Factor 0.462
1995 Impact Factor 0.47
1994 Impact Factor 0.424
1993 Impact Factor 0.083
1992 Impact Factor 0.013

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 3.00
Cited half-life 8.00
Immediacy index 0.35
Eigenfactor 0.01
Article influence 1.09
Website Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice website
Other titles Transportation research. Part A, Policy and practice, Policy and practice, Transportation research-A
ISSN 0965-8564
OCLC 25574875
Material type Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

Elsevier

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Pre-print allowed on any website or open access repository
    • Voluntary deposit by author of authors post-print allowed on authors' personal website, arXiv.org or institutions open scholarly website including Institutional Repository, without embargo, where there is not a policy or mandate
    • Deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate only allowed where separate agreement between repository and the publisher exists.
    • Permitted deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate, may be required to comply with embargo periods of 12 months to 48 months .
    • Set statement to accompany deposit
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to journal home page or articles' DOI
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • NIH Authors articles will be submitted to PubMed Central after 12 months
    • Publisher last contacted on 18/10/2013
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This work examines the temporal–spatial variations of daily automobile distance traveled and greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs) and their association with built environment attributes and household socio-demographics. A GHGs household inventory is determined using link-level average speeds for a large and representative sample of households in three origin–destination surveys (1998, 2003 and 2008) in Montreal, Canada. For the emission inventories, different sources of data are combined including link-level average speeds in the network, vehicle occupancy levels and fuel consumption characteristics of the vehicle fleet. Urban form indicators over time such as population density, land use mix and transit accessibility are generated for each household in each of the three waves. A latent class (LC) regression modeling framework is then implemented to investigate the association of built environment and socio-demographics with GHGs and automobile distance traveled. Among other results, it is found that population density, transit accessibility and land-use mix have small but statistically significant negative impact on GHGs and car usage. Despite that this is in accordance with past studies, the estimated elasticities are greater than those reported in the literature for North American cities. Moreover, different household subpopulations are identified in which the effect of built environment varies significantly. Also, a reduction of the average GHGs at the household level is observed over time. According to our estimates, households produced 15% and 10% more GHGs in 1998 and 2003 respectively, compared to 2008. This reduction can be associated to the improvement of the fuel economy of vehicle fleet and the decrease of motor-vehicle usage – e.g., a decrease of 4% is observed for fuel efficiency rates and 12% for distance according to the raw average estimates from 1998 with respect to 2008. A strong link is also observed between socio-demographics and the two travel outcomes. While number of workers is positively associated with car distance and GHGs, low and medium income households pollute less than high-income households.
    Transportation Research Part A Policy and Practice 07/2015; 77. DOI:10.1016/j.tra.2015.04.002
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    ABSTRACT: The LAX North Airfield Safety Study was undertaken by an Academic Panel consisting of the present authors, and was based in large part on a simulation that was conducted at FutureFlight Central at NASA Ames Research Center. The primary aim of the study was “to estimate as specifically as possible the level of future safety associated with several geometrical configurations of the LAX North Airfield.” This paper describes the study, and how it combined information from human-in-the-loop simulations at NASA with historical data from LAX and other US airports about runway incursions and collisions. The analysis indicated that, even under its existing physical layout, LAX North would experience very low risk of runway collisions at traffic levels projected for 2020. That risk could be reduced by about half if the North Airfield runways were reconfigured, and some reconfigurations would also add appreciably to the operational efficiency of the airport. But because the “baseline” level of risk is so low, the Study concluded that “it would be difficult to construct a compelling case on safety grounds alone for reconfiguring the North Airfield.”
    Transportation Research Part A Policy and Practice 07/2015; 77. DOI:10.1016/j.tra.2015.03.003
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    ABSTRACT: The aeronautical industry is still under expansion in spite of the problems it is facing due to the increase in oil prices, limited capacity, and novel regulations. The expansion trends translate into problems at different locations within an airport system and are more evident when the resources to cope with the demand are limited or are reaching to theirs limits. In the check-in areas they are appreciated as excessive waiting times which in turn are appreciated by the customers as bad service levels. The article presents a novel methodology that combines an evolutionary algorithm and simulation in order to give the best results taking into account not only the mandatory hard and soft rules determined by the internal policies of an airport terminal but also the quality indicators which are very difficult to include using an abstract representation. The evolutionary algorithm is developed to satisfy the different mandatory restrictions for the allocation problem such as minimum and maximum number of check-in desks per flight, load balance in the check-in islands, opening times of check-in desks and other restrictions imposed by the level of service agreement. Once the solutions are obtained, a second evaluation is performed using a simulation model of the terminal that takes into account the stochastic aspects of the problem such as arriving profiles of the passengers, opening times physical configurations of the facility among other with the objective to determine which allocation is the most efficient in real situations in order to maintain the quality indicators at the desired level.
    Transportation Research Part A Policy and Practice 07/2015; 77. DOI:10.1016/j.tra.2015.04.016
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    ABSTRACT: Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) have the potential to reduce green house gas emissions from the transport sector. However, the limited electric range of PEVs could impede their market introduction. Still some potential users are willing to pay more for PEVs. The combined effect of these and other influencing factors as well as the resulting future market evolution are unclear. Here, we study the market evolution of PEVs in Germany until 2020. Our results reveal a great deal of uncertainty in the market evolution of PEVs due to external conditions and the users’ willingness to pay. We find the future share of PEVs in German passenger car stock to range from 0.4% to almost 3% by 2020. Energy prices have a large impact on PEV market evolution as a 25% increase in fuel prices would double the number of PEVs in stock by 2020 compared to a reference scenario. We find a special depreciation allowance for commercial vehicles and a subsidy of 1000 Euro as the most effective and efficient monetary policy options. The high uncertainty of the market evolution implies that policies to foster market diffusion of PEVs should be dynamically adaptable to react to changing framework conditions.
    Transportation Research Part A Policy and Practice 07/2015; 77. DOI:10.1016/j.tra.2015.04.001
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    ABSTRACT: There is growing evidence that consumers respond more effectively to upfront price signals, such as vehicle purchase taxes and feebate policies, and to tax incentives that are more salient than others, such as company car taxes graded by CO2 emissions. This paper examines tax changes in The Netherlands, which are among the most stringent and most salient in Europe, and assesses the ex-post purchasing impacts and CO2 effectiveness of six years of CO2-based tax incentives for low-carbon cars in The Netherlands. Dutch tax incentives resulted in 13 g/km, or 11% lower average CO2 emissions in 2013. The Netherlands has moved from the 12th position before the tax changes in 2007 to become Europe’s number one in terms of the lowest average new car CO2 emissions and highest share of electric vehicles in 2013. Tax incentives for new cars sold between 2008 and 2013 have resulted in 4.6 million tons of potential lifetime CO2 abatement at the cost of a drop in tax revenues of 30–50%. However, when corrected for the Dutch policy-induced increasing real-world fuel-economy shortfall and leakage of carbon reduction potential through vehicle export of low-carbon cars, only 3.5 million tons or 75% of the CO2 reduction remains. CO2-based tax incentives for company cars seem to have contributed the most to the observed turnaround in purchasing behavior towards lower CO2-emitting passenger cars.
    Transportation Research Part A Policy and Practice 07/2015; 77. DOI:10.1016/j.tra.2015.04.009
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    ABSTRACT: For decades, carsharing has become an attentive dialogue among transportation planners and civic groups who have long supported and business owners and government officials who see carsharing as a means to realize their interests i.e., another market for revenue generation and replacement of government own vehicles with carshare units. It has particularly drawn attention in New York City (NYC). As of today, NYC is the largest carsharing market in the United States, accounting for about one third of all North American carsharing members. In addition to market-driven forces, the City government has pronounced pro-carsharing policies. Yet carsharing is still considered as an exclusive program to middle-income, white, and young populations. The purpose of this study is to see if carsharing can help meet the mobility demand for urban residents, especially in the marginalized neighborhoods. By investigating a leading carsharing program – Zipcar’s vehicle utilization pattern in NYC, I attempt to disentangle how neighborhoods with different socio-demographics are associated with carsharing usage. The study result revealed that there is high demand for midsize (standard) vehicles on weekdays and weeknights. In addition, carsharing usage was highly correlated with the number of total vehicles, not the number of Zipcar parking lots, if the cars are accessible within walking distances. More importantly, carsharing in low-income neighborhoods did not differ from the typical carsharing locations. What matters is the affordability. Hence, there is no reason not to consider new services or expanding existing service boundaries to the outer boroughs in the future.
    Transportation Research Part A Policy and Practice 07/2015; 77. DOI:10.1016/j.tra.2015.04.020
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    ABSTRACT: Autonomous vehicles (AVs) represent a potentially disruptive yet beneficial change to our transportation system. This new technology has the potential to impact vehicle safety, congestion, and travel behavior. All told, major social AV impacts in the form of crash savings, travel time reduction, fuel efficiency and parking benefits are estimated to approach $2000 to per year per AV, and may eventually approach nearly $4000 when comprehensive crash costs are accounted for. Yet barriers to implementation and mass-market penetration remain. Initial costs will likely be unaffordable. Licensing and testing standards in the U.S. are being developed at the state level, rather than nationally, which may lead to inconsistencies across states. Liability details remain undefined, security concerns linger, and without new privacy standards, a default lack of privacy for personal travel may become the norm. The impacts and interactions with other components of the transportation system, as well as implementation details, remain uncertain. To address these concerns, the federal government should expand research in these areas and create a nationally recognized licensing framework for AVs, determining appropriate standards for liability, security, and data privacy.
    Transportation Research Part A Policy and Practice 07/2015; 77. DOI:10.1016/j.tra.2015.04.003
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    ABSTRACT: With the rapid increase of electric bicycles (E-bikes) in China, the heterogeneous bicycle traffic flow comprising regular bicycles and E-bikes using shared cycleway creates issues in terms of efficiency as well as safety. Capacity and bicycle equivalent units (BEUs) for E-bikes are two most important parameters for the planning, design, operation, and management of bicycle facilities. In this paper, eight traffic flow fundamental diagrams are developed for one-way cycleway capacity estimation, and a novel BEU estimation model is also proposed. Eleven datasets from different shared cycleway sections with different cycleway widths were collected in Hangzhou, China for estimation and evaluation purposes. The results indicate that, with around 70% share of E-bikes, the mean estimated capacity is 2348 bicycle/h/m. The effects on the capacity of the proportions of E-bikes, gender of cyclists, age of cyclists, and cyclists carrying things were also analyzed. The results implied that the estimated capacity is independent of a cyclist’s gender and age, but increases with the proportion of E-bikes. According to this study, the mean BEU for the E-bike is 0.66, and the converted capacities of pure regular bicycles and pure E-bikes are 1800 and 2727 bicycle/h/m, respectively. These findings can be used to propose practical countermeasures to improve the capacity of heterogeneous bicycle traffic flow on shared cycleway.
    Transportation Research Part A Policy and Practice 07/2015; 77. DOI:10.1016/j.tra.2015.04.013
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    ABSTRACT: This paper investigates crowding effect on the path choice of metro passengers. We show people reroute not only to avoid the delay from crowding but also to evade crowding itself. More specifically, a logit model fits best when it uses the transit delay from crowding as well as the passenger load of a connection in addition to the conventional explanatory variables. Also, we demonstrate that crowding decreases the overall welfare of metro passengers. The model is tested on the real path choice data acquired by the recent algorithm by Hong et al. (2015) known to detect the real path choice from Smart Card data in more than 90% of the cases.
    Transportation Research Part A Policy and Practice 07/2015; 77. DOI:10.1016/j.tra.2015.04.023
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    ABSTRACT: Whilst congestion in automobile traffic increases trip durations, this is often not the case in rail-based public transport where congestion rather leads to in-vehicle crowding, often neglected in empirical studies. Using original survey data from Paris, this article assesses the distribution of comfort costs of congestion in public transport. Estimating willingness to pay for less crowded trips at different levels of in-vehicle passenger density we cannot reject a simple linear relationship between crowding costs and density. We apply our results to the cost-benefit analysis of a recent Parisian public transport project.
    Transportation Research Part A Policy and Practice 07/2015; 77. DOI:10.1016/j.tra.2015.04.005
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    ABSTRACT: This paper provides a hierarchical customer satisfaction framework to measure rail transit lines’ performances in Istanbul. The problems related to rail transit line systems are addressed via customer satisfaction surveys. Then, a framework is proposed combining statistical analysis, fuzzy analytic hierarchy process, trapezoidal fuzzy sets and Choquet integral to evaluate customer satisfaction levels. Next, the criteria need to be improved are determined and specific recommendations to enhance the operation for specific lines are suggested. The proposed framework provides directions for the future investments and it also can be used at a more macroscopic level to determine the operational deficiencies. Furthermore, it can be generalized and applied to complex decision making problems that include uncertain and subjective data or vague information.
    Transportation Research Part A Policy and Practice 07/2015; 77. DOI:10.1016/j.tra.2015.03.029
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    ABSTRACT: Transit fares are an effective tool for demand management. Transit agencies can raise revenue or relieve overcrowding via fare increases, but they are always confronted with the possibility of heavy ridership losses. Therefore, the outcome of fare changes should be evaluated before implementation. In this work, a methodology was formulated based on elasticity and exhaustive transit card data, and a network approach was proposed to assess the influence of distance-based fare increases on ridership and revenue. The approach was applied to a fare change plan for Beijing Metro. The price elasticities of demand for Beijing Metro at various fare levels and trip distances were tabulated from a stated preference survey. Trip data recorded by an automatic fare collection system was used alongside the topology of the Beijing Metro system to calculate the shortest path lengths between all station pairs, the origin–destination matrix, and trip lengths. Finally, three fare increase alternatives (high, medium, and low) were evaluated in terms of their impact on ridership and revenue. The results demonstrated that smart card data have great potential with regard to fare change evaluation. According to smart card data for a large transit network, the statistical frequency of trip lengths is more highly concentrated than that of the shortest path length. Moreover, the majority of the total trips have a length of around 15 km, and these are the most sensitive to fare increases. Specific attention should be paid to this characteristic when developing fare change plans to manage demand or raise revenue.
    Transportation Research Part A Policy and Practice 07/2015; 77. DOI:10.1016/j.tra.2015.04.018
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    ABSTRACT: This article examines how innovation can be strategically incorporated into transportation systems. Large transportation systems generally have a poor record in systematically integrating innovation in their development, construction and operation. Our research setting is Crossrail, a major new railway traversing London, where the creation and implementation of an innovation strategy formalized and systemized its approach to innovation. Based on in-depth, semi-structured interviews with project leaders and participant observation, the paper critically analyses the formulation, implementation and performance of Crossrail’s innovation strategy. Crossrail’s management explicitly uses an ‘open innovation’ strategy that incentivizes partners, contractors, and clients to innovate in the project. Its strategy guides decisions and priorities on innovation and the types and levels of innovation that best match project aims. The paper holds lessons for those developing, operating and studying large transportation systems both now and into the future.
    Transportation Research Part A Policy and Practice 07/2015; 77. DOI:10.1016/j.tra.2015.04.019
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    ABSTRACT: This study uses EUROCONTROL data on operating performance of the national air navigation service providers over the 2002–2011 time period to document in detail the efficiency changes across providers and time using data envelopment analysis. Our results suggest that overall providers’ productivity improved over the time period covered by the data, driven by improvements in technical rather than allocative efficiency. However, some trend reversals in the post-2008 crisis period are also observed.
    Transportation Research Part A Policy and Practice 07/2015; 77. DOI:10.1016/j.tra.2015.04.007
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    ABSTRACT: This paper examines traveller attitudes and responses towards disruption from weather and natural events. An internet-based travel behaviour survey was conducted with more than 2000 respondents in London and Glasgow. Of these respondents, 740 reported information on over 1000 long distance trips affected by extreme weather and natural events over the previous three years. Results show respondents are generally cautious towards travelling during extreme weather events. For a slight majority in the case of air and public transport, and a greater one in the case of car, travellers did not considerably alter their travel plan following the disruption. This was explained not only by less disruptive weather conditions (with heavy snow and volcanic ash being the most disruptive) and impact, but also by the relative importance of their trips. Differences between transport modes were not substantial. Business trips sometimes appeared to give travellers more flexibility, some other times not. Origin and destination did have an impact on reaction, as well as the presence of children whilst travelling. Mixed results were obtained about socio-economic and attitudinal variables. Age in particular did not appear to have a significant effect. Whilst most respondents did acknowledge no external influence in their decision, results showed an important contribution of transport organisation staff, as well as home and mobile internet technology. A limited but still considerable number of respondents indicated their closest friends/relatives as the main influence of their decisions. The results will help planners deploy strategies to mitigate the negative effects of weather related disruptions.
    Transportation Research Part A Policy and Practice 07/2015; 77:305-319. DOI:10.1016/j.tra.2015.04.025
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study is to analyze the public acceptability of deep subterranean railway systems, which will be constructed in the space 40m below ground level and will be operated at twice the speed of the existing subway system. Although such railway systems have been feasible in terms of construction technologies and economics, public acceptability must be considered for the successful introduction of such a new public infrastructure. Therefore, to perform the analysis of public acceptability, a telephone-based survey was conducted for residents in the vicinity of the planned the deep subterranean railway systems. As a result, about 70% of the respondents answered that they took a neutral or opposing attitude to introducing the deep subterranean railway systems. Awareness of the deep subterranean railway systems has a positive impact on its acceptability. In addition, the acceptability is found to show a negative relationship with environment and inconvenience factors. Based on the analysis results, an affective approach through soft measures such as awareness campaigns and advertisements is recommended to effectively address and mitigate the concerns and issues raised by the public.
    Transportation Research Part A Policy and Practice 07/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study is to analyze the public acceptability of deep subterranean railway systems, which will be constructed in the space 40m below ground level and will be operated at twice the speed of the existing subway system. Although such railway systems have been feasible in terms of construction technologies and economics, public acceptability must be considered for the successful introduction of such a new public infrastructure. Therefore, to perform the analysis of public acceptability, a telephone-based survey was conducted for residents in the vicinity of the planned the deep subterranean railway systems. As a result, about 70% of the respondents answered that they took a neutral or opposing attitude to introducing the deep subterranean railway systems. Awareness of the deep subterranean railway systems has a positive impact on its acceptability. In addition, the acceptability is found to show a negative relationship with environment and inconvenience factors. Based on the analysis results, an affective approach through soft measures such as awareness campaigns and advertisements is recommended to effectively address and mitigate the concerns and issues raised by the public.
    Transportation Research Part A Policy and Practice 07/2015; 77:82-94. DOI:10.1016/j.tra.2015.04.008