European Planning Studies (EUR PLAN STUD )

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Description

European Planning Studies provides a forum for ideas and information about spatial development processes and policies in Europe. The journal publishes articles of a theoretical, empirical and policy-relevant nature and is particularly concerned to integrate knowledge of processes with practical policy proposals, implementation and evaluation. Articles of particular interest to the journal focus upon specific spatial development problems, as well as emerging explanations of new urban, regional, national or supranational developmental tendencies. Country-specific, region-specific or locality-specific issues are focused upon, although comparative analysis is of especial value. Case studies of successful spatial policies and critiques of policy failure based on in-depth study are both welcomed. A key feature of the journal is to generalize learning about best practice analysis and policy-formulation in the field of spatial development planning. Additionally, European Planning Studies features articles which focus on the functional dimensions of planning, such as infrastructure, communications, environmental quality, design, cultural, social welfare, recreational, housing, industrial and employment concerns of planning at whatever spatial scale. Articles which are concerned with these questions in an appropriate spatial context, given the scope of the journal, are of special interest. The journal also carries European Briefing, Research Briefing and Book Reviews sections. European Planning Studies is published in cooperation with the Association of European Schools of Planning (AESOP), an independent body of professional planning educators with a membership of over 100 planning schools throughout Western and Eastern Europe.

Impact factor 1.03

  • 5-year impact
    0.98
  • Cited half-life
    6.20
  • Immediacy index
    0.29
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.29
  • Website
    European Planning Studies website
  • Other titles
    European planning studies (Online)
  • ISSN
    0965-4313
  • OCLC
    45010068
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • On author's personal website or departmental website immediately
    • On institutional repository or subject-based repository after either 12 months embargo for STM, Behavioural Science and Public Health Journals or 18 months embargo for SSH journals
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • The publisher will deposit in on behalf of authors to a designated institutional repository including PubMed Central, where a deposit agreement exists with the repository
    • STM: Science, Technology and Medicine
    • SSH: Social Science and Humanities
    • Publisher last contacted on 25/03/2014
    • 'Taylor & Francis (Psychology Press)' is an imprint of 'Taylor & Francis'
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Luxembourg's planning system is currently undergoing a fundamental reform with the establishment of completely new structures in some parts of it. The present paper reflects these developments in the following steps: We start by proposing a heuristic based on the planning culture perspective originally developed by Frank Othengrafen and colleagues, taking into account (a) planning artefacts, (b) the planning environment, and (c) the societal environment. Before we subsume the contemporary developments of the planning system we provide a brief description of Luxembourg's spatial context which, due to the country's small size and the high growth rates of its economy and population in the past years, displays a number of peculiar features. Applying the planning culture perspective on the planning system and its societal context reveals not only hybrid characteristics with regard to neighbouring systems. It also provides the important characteristics of the small state and shows the limits of the planning culture perspective.
    European Planning Studies 03/2015; 23(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In Germany, land consumption for settlement and transport development amounts to 100 ha/day, thus significantly exceeding the goal set by Germany's sustainability strategy, which aims at reducing the rate of the expansion of built-up areas to 30 ha/day by the year 2020. Increased orientation of local authorities and stakeholders towards the promotion of economic competitiveness, complex interrelations between actors involved in planning, substantial planning autonomy of Germany's local administrative units, as well as stronger democratic norms in planning, render a traditional linear planning scheme obsolete. The federal administration and publicly funded research institutions therefore opted for a non-legislative approach aiming at the production of a body of methodologies, which would engage participation processes and deliberative decision-making. The name being a German acronym for “Research for the Reduction of Land Consumption and for Sustainable Land Management”, this collaborative national programme gathered a number of planning actors who have framed the complex topic of sustainable land use into a series of manageable, fundable and adjustable projects which take into account multiple spatial and time scales. This paper emphasizes the elements found within REFINA which lead the way towards a strategic communication-based, integrated and multilevel approach to dealing with land consumption.
    European Planning Studies 03/2015; 23(3).
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    ABSTRACT: The departure point for the paper is the need to scrutinize previously unconsidered dimensions which are fundamental to understanding the dynamics of the planning enforcement system. Drawing upon emerging themes in regulation theory the paper fuses these with knowledge constructs. The rationale is that the regulatory regimes must be informed by knowledge imparted from a range of sources and the resultant quality of decision making in pursuit of remedies is inextricably linked to the robustness of the evidence base collated. The theoretical analysis, coupled with radical legislative changes, provides a lens for an empirical investigation which scrutinizes tactics, strategies, operational mechanisms, attitudinal dimensions and ethics with a view to identifying the key factors impacting upon enforcement efficacy. Prizes and pitfalls are identified in the course of the analysis and evaluation, with evidence-based remedies suggested where appropriate. The paper concludes by reflecting on the importance of theoretical synergy and epistemological advancement, taking cognisance of ethical and attitudinal challenges facing the planning profession; and, brings to book those who flagrantly breach the Code of Professional Conduct.
    European Planning Studies 03/2015; 23(3).
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    ABSTRACT: Agricultural policy and farm lobby groups often stress the role of farm production in sustaining local economies. This paper considers the spatial pattern of upstream and downstream agricultural transactions of farms in North East Scotland and, in particular, the extent to which they take place within the locality of the farm holding. Three alternative definitions of “local” are considered: a distance-based measure; a measure which takes into account the location of the farm in relation to the nearest town; and a measure which takes into account the location of agribusinesses, defining a transaction as local if the farmer buys from (sells to) the nearest available input supplier (output purchaser). The results highlight the importance of allowing for context when explaining farmer purchasing and sales decisions. They also reveal a highly complex pattern of production-related linkages in the region, with many farmers choosing to bypass their most proximate agribusinesses. Certain towns are found to dominate agriculture-related transactions in the region, reflecting the spatial concentration of upstream and downstream agribusinesses. The findings provide new insights into theoretical debates on the role of small towns in the urban system and the changing importance of geographical distance in determining business transactions.
    European Planning Studies 03/2015; 23(3).
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    ABSTRACT: Access to global innovation networks (GINs) has been unequal across the regions of the world. While certain regions are considered knowledge hubs in GINs, others still remain marginalized; this points to the role of regional innovation systems (RISs) in the emergence and development of GINs. Using firm-level data collected through a survey and case studies in 2009–2010, this paper systematically compares the patterns of global networks in the information and communications technology industry in a selection of European, Chinese and Indian regions. The results show that GINs are more common in regions which are not organizationally and institutionally thick, suggesting that GINs may be a compensatory mechanism for weaknesses in the RIS.
    European Planning Studies 02/2015; 23(2).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Planning of rural areas is essential for the preservation of the countryside and the rural settlements (RSs), as well as for the provision of services, infrastructures and resources. In this paper the criteria for the identification and delimitation of RSs established by the successive land use laws in Galicia (a region of NW Spain) are assessed to determine if these criteria have successfully contributed to spatial delimitation. With this aim the relevance, effectiveness, efficiency, impact, sustainability, coherence and added value indicators, established by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development for the evaluation of policies, have been used, as well as the objectivity, space typology and consistency indices. The results indicate that the legal criteria for RS planning have evolved towards a more objective and quantitative approach, especially through an improvement in the spatial concept of RS. This improvement is due to the definition and description of different typologies of RS areas and the incorporation in the criteria of qualitative and quantitative descriptions.
    European Planning Studies 02/2015; 23(2).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article aims at assessing the diversity of regional innovation systems and their economic performance in Europe. We propose to adapt the social systems of innovation and production (SSIP) framework at the regional level by identifying the specific arrangements of each part of the innovation and production system. Three key features of European regions are investigated using this framework: the diversity of regional SSIP, the interplay of regional and national determinants of such systems, and the impact of SSIP on regional performance. We identify a typology of regional configurations resulting from the combination of scientific, technological, educational and industrial indicators, using multivariate data analysis. A variance analysis approach is then developed in order to test the existence of specific regional growth regimes. The results highlight a persistently high level of diversity of regional configurations, notably among knowledge intensive regions, but also show that national institutional settings remain of fundamental importance in shaping a number of regional configurations. A final conclusion relates to the weak correlation observed between the structural characteristics of regions and their performance over the 2003–2007 period: regional performance remains primarily shaped by national trends. Overall, the paper questions the regional dimension of these “systems”.
    European Planning Studies 02/2015; 23(2).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: As a result of increasing competition and internationalization, many Western European cities have invested in exhibition facilities. Surprisingly, many new exhibition centres emerge in the urban periphery. An assessment of the 34 largest exhibition centres in Western Europe shows that only 16 are still centrally located while 18 now have a peripheral location. This is a drastic break from the traditional location of these centres in inner city cores. Behind this observation of spatial change is a complex set of dilemmas about investments in current or new locations. A fresh analytical model (based on assumptions of path dependency) is constructed and employed to analyse time and place specific determinants and opportunities. Two contrasting cases are selected in comparable German cities. Frankfurt decided to renew its facilities in the centre of the city, whereas Munich opened a relocated exhibition centre in 1998. Based on these case studies, the paper concludes that there is no autonomous force pulling exhibition centres towards the periphery, but it is rather a misfit between the central location and new physical, functional, spatial, and institutional demands that causes a facility to move.
    European Planning Studies 02/2015; 23(2).
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    ABSTRACT: Universities' potential to contribute to regional value creation has been extensively discussed so far and significant literature has been devoted to celebrated cases in highly industrialized and developed countries. Assuming that it would be misleading to generalize from “exceptional” cases, some authors have focused their attention specifically on the influence of universities in less developed areas regions and countries, where university–industry relations are far from being a Triple Helix. This paper focuses on the mechanisms of university–industry knowledge transfer (KT) in Romania, a post-communist country with relatively weak regional innovation performances, except for the capital region Bucharest-Ilfov. The purpose of the study is to construct an index to compare university–industry KT across the eight Romanian regions. Data to be aggregated are collected from 90 Romanian higher education institutions and refer to their KT potential in terms of human, financial and relational inputs, outputs and outcomes (patent applications, new products and services, spin-offs and commercial income). Finally, universities' regional KT performances are compared to small and medium enterprises territorial patterns and issuing policy implications are discussed.
    European Planning Studies 02/2015; 23(2).
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    ABSTRACT: The Portuguese mountain city of Covilhã possesses a singular industrial tradition. Today, many of the urban interventions undertaken result in an urban space and landscape disconnected from the mountains. Alpine mountain cities emerge as emblematic, given the representativeness the Alps assume within the context of European mountains. In the Alpine region, the polycentric system of cities condenses the characteristics associated with the topographical particularities and singular types of inter-municipal and cross-border relationships, where the economic changes and regional policies can be observed with greater clarity due to their specificity. In general terms, the quality of life, based on the landscape values, the identification of the citizens with their territory, and on the territorial planning at different scales, emerges as being linked to the construction of a brand identity based on sustainable urban development. It is in this sphere that the study of Alpine cases can inspire good practices to be applied in the Portuguese territory of the Beira Interior, namely in the medium-sized cities and in the synergies between them and the natural spaces. Thus Covilhã finds itself in an advantageous position to use its situation to construct a city brand in harmony with the mountain territory.
    European Planning Studies 02/2015; 23(2).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Once a flourishing mining area, Parkstad Limburg in the south of the Netherlands is now facing limited economic vitality and structural changes in its demographic composition. In a process of selective migration, young and highly educated people tend to move out of the region, while elderly and less- educated people stay. Shrinkage in Parkstad Limburg has resulted in a declining basis for economic activity, an unbalanced housing market, and policy responses in order to deal with these phenomena. Unfortunately acceptance of the phenomenon is a difficult step and a time-consuming process. While after years of denial most politicians and policy-makers in Parkstad Limburg have finally accepted the decline, the inhabitants of the region have to be confronted with inconvenient decisions like demolishing houses and the closure of public facilities. Based on the findings in Parkstad Limburg, it is concluded that a suitable policy response consists of the acceptance of shrinkage, developing a long-term vision, engaging the inhabitants in the process, restructuring the housing market, and fostering intensive regional collaboration.
    European Planning Studies 01/2015; 23(1).
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    ABSTRACT: The goal of this article is to draw attention to one of the currently observed trends in the geography of cities in the context of the networking of cities of similar development profiles. In that context, the most important examples of the urban networks were analysed, including the following networks: the UNESCO Creative Cities Network and Eurocities as well known side-network initiatives of the European Capital of Culture. Each network was analysed in the context of business objectives and the conditions for participation. In addition to that, the article describes the idea of cluster forming with particular emphasis on creative industries clusters. Moreover, this article is devoted to Polish experiences connected with the participation of the Polish cities in international networks of creative cities, establishing creative clusters in Poland and with cluster initiatives.
    European Planning Studies 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The rapid rise of creative or cultural industries not only contributes to regional economic growth, but also to a revised spatial model of urban structure, helping in the redevelopment of old town spaces. However, the spatial characteristics of creative clusters, especially at the micro-city level, are not fully understood. This study attempts to characterize the spatiality of creative clusters on the basis of a literature review and empirical study of Shanghai. By using Geographical Information System (GIS) spatial analysis and interviews, this paper examines the spatial features of creative clusters in Shanghai and their connection with urban historical, social, cultural and political aspects. It finds that creative clusters are primarily distributed in particular locations of Shanghai, namely in the inner-city, old industrial districts, places close to universities, Central Business Districts (CBDs), and entertainment and tourist zones. The old colonial zones in Shanghai play an important role in fostering the agglomeration of creative industries because of the special image of these spaces, in particular due to the abundant workshop spaces remaining from the industrial heritage. Great intimacy between creative industries and urban spaces becomes apparent in the case of Shanghai, demonstrating that the creative economy has become an important instrument in regenerating cities. Moreover, a differentiation in space among various categories of creative clusters in Shanghai was also noticed in this study.
    European Planning Studies 11/2014; 22(11).
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    ABSTRACT: This paper examines the evolution of regional innovation policy in Emilia-Romagna and Valencia, two regions with similar economic features that implemented close innovation policies in the 1970s and 1980s. We investigate whether their similarities have led to parallel targets, policy tools and governance developments. We show that innovation policy in both regions suffered from the effects of privatization, budget constraints and changes to manufacturing during the 1990s and we highlight the consequences. Although Emilia-Romagna experienced deeper changes to its innovation policy, privatizations and/or the replacement of public funds promoted commercial approaches and induced market failures in both regions. The worst effects of these policies were the implementation of less-risky innovation projects, the shift towards extra-regional projects and markets, and the favouring of large firms.
    European Planning Studies 11/2014; 22(11).
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    ABSTRACT: From a theoretical perspective, it is possible to enhance the innovation of firms and institutions by combining the analytic (scientific) knowledge base of research and development (R&D) institutions with the synthetic (practical) knowledge base of industries. Such combinations of knowledge are also believed to support regional development. One such initiative to bridge knowledge from the R&D sector and industry is the Norwegian Centre for Offshore Wind Energy (NORCOWE). However, as our case study shows, it is hard to bridge knowledge from these two partner groups. We found that this is mainly because of differences in the partners' timelines (long versus short), their attitudes toward knowledge (research based versus experience based), application of the knowledge (knowledge per se versus commercialization), and organizational dimensions (linear/closed process versus interactive/open process). These differences show that the knowledge bases of these two groups may not just be different; they can also be seen as discrepant. We also argue that the NORCOWE initiative is influenced by a “policy push” logic. This implies that the initiative was not properly embedded in the industrial or R&D institutions before being launched, but was instead driven by a political will to promote the development of a new renewable energy source.
    European Planning Studies 11/2014; 22(11).