Disaster Prevention and Management (Disast Prev Manag )

Publisher: University of Bradford. Disaster Prevention and Limitation Unit, Emerald

Description

You never know when a disaster is going to happen or what form it will take. Yet planning for the unknown can make the difference between a successful salvage operation and disorganized panic.

  • Impact factor
    0.34
  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
    7.60
  • Immediacy index
    0.00
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.00
  • Website
    Disaster Prevention and Management website
  • Other titles
    Disaster prevention and management (Online)
  • ISSN
    0965-3562
  • OCLC
    45178145
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Emerald

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Voluntary deposit by author of author's pre-print or author's post-print allowed on author's personal website or Institutional repository, where there is no mandate to deposit
    • If mandated by a funding agency, the author's post-print may be deposited in any open access repository after a 24 months embargo period
    • Author's pre-print and Author's post-print not allowed on subject-based repository
    • Must link to publisher version with DOI
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Published source must be acknowledged with set statement
    • Non-commercial
    • Publisher last contacted on 02/04/2013
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Forthcoming
    Disaster Prevention and Management 04/2015; 24(2).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to analyze flood vulnerability vis-à-vis flood-induced health risks, and understand the relationship between them to suggest measures to reduce health risks in Sudan. Design/methodology/approach – This study compares the vulnerability to flood and health consequences in two communities in Aroma. This study compares the vulnerability of Aroma semi-urban vicinity and Tendellei rural village, in Sudan, to flood and health consequences. A set of socioeconomic and health indicators were studied in 251 households. Households were classified according to their calculated vulnerability composite index. The index was validated through comparing the vulnerability values with the level of impact in each household. Findings – About 30 percent of households are highly/very highly vulnerable to flood risk. On the other hand, 41 percent of the rural households and 25 percent of the semi-urban houses are highly/very highly vulnerable to health risks. The main determinants of flood vulnerability are; the number of earning family members, level of education and economic activity of the household's head. The rural households are found to be more vulnerable to health risks while semi-urban households are more vulnerable to flooding. Flood and health vulnerabilities are positively correlated. Factors like urbanization, poverty and education directly affect the vulnerability of communities. Research limitations/implications – The methodology could be strengthened through the running of multi-various regression to relate selected vulnerability indicators to incidence of malaria and diarrhea in each household. Practical implications – The method described in this paper is flexible; applicable and can be reproduced for other areas and risks. Social implications – Vulnerability determinants affect the two communities differently and this necessitates specific consideration when developing policy. The policy should tackle the root causes of vulnerability to cut the vicious circle of poverty, illiteracy and illness. Those root causes should be managed by integrating multi-hazard approaches for effective and efficient interventions. Originality/value – The method described in this paper is original, flexible; applicable and can be reproduced for other areas and risks.
    Disaster Prevention and Management 07/2014; 23(4):395-419.
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to: explore major and potential challenges facing healthcare facilities operation specifically those related to utility supplies; and quantify the impact of utility supplies interruption on the operation of healthcare facilities through the development of an estimation model. Design/methodology/approach – A pluralistic qualitative and quantitative research approach benefiting from an online computer program that applies the discriminant function analysis approach. Information was collected from 66 hospitals following three major earthquakes that struck northeast Japan in 2003. Findings – Analysis demonstrated that healthcare utilities face three major challenges: vulnerability of infrastructure to natural hazards; low performance of alternative sources; and lack of consideration of healthcare utility supplies in resilience codes and legislations. The study also proposed a method to estimate the impact of utility interruption of healthcare facilities. A model has been developed for the case study hospitals in Northern Japan following three major earthquakes in 2003. Practical implications – The findings are expected to raise the awareness of the critical role utilities play for the operation of healthcare facilities which will potentially lead to upgrading resilience codes and legislations. The findings are also expected to pool the literature with more information about the resilience of healthcare utility publications. Originality/value – The topic and issues discussed in this research are original based on authors’ investigations following three major earthquakes that took place in northeast Japan. The study followed a statistical approach in addressing the inter-relationship between the utility systems post disasters to develop an innovative unique index to predict the impact of utility shortage on healthcare.
    Disaster Prevention and Management 01/2014; 23(1):40-52.
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose ‐ Bantul in Central Java was the most severely damaged area by a devastating earthquake in May 2006. Even after being victims themselves, nurses and midwives at public health centers worked devotedly. The purpose of this paper is to identify the nurses' and midwives' perceptions and understanding of their roles, as well as the needs of training in disaster preparedness and management. Design/methodology/approach ‐ Focus group discussions and questionnaire survey were conducted with 11 nurses and 11 midwives of public health centers in Bantul. Content analysis was applied to analyze transcripts of the focus group discussions and the responses to questionnaire. Findings ‐ Health care for survivors and community were provided by highly committed health professionals supported in strong community resilience. Donors driven relief programs tended to be unorganized and insensitive for local health providers. Besides, organized disaster management trainings are strongly needed to develop disaster nursing and preparedness. Research limitations/implications ‐ Embedded problems of local health system and current nursing practice were highlighted. Originality/value ‐ Focus group discussions provided vital information that can and must be used to improve disaster response capabilities. Moreover, it was equally it is crucial to examine carefully what unfolded during post-disaster intervention.
    Disaster Prevention and Management 01/2014; 23(4).
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose ‐ Teacher training is significant for effective school disaster management. The purposes of this paper are: first, to set items for analysis of teacher training program of Armenia through identification of teacher training program of Emergency And Rescue Team by school staff in Hyogo (EARTH) to understand the characteristics of teacher training program of Armenia; second, to identify common points and different points of school disaster management and teacher training between EARTH and Armenia to understand the characteristics of one of training program of Japan; and third, to propose improvement of teacher training of Armenia through identification of problems to give suggestions to improve teacher training program of Armenia. Design/methodology/approach ‐ One of teacher training program for school disaster management in Japan can be considered as a good practice. The objectives are achieved through the comparison of teacher training program between Armenia and Japan. Findings ‐ In Armenia, there are three training targets. Training contents should be developed after the clear concept development of training for each target. This paper proposed the concept based on EARTH training program. Normalization of school including psychological care is the main contents for school directors and deputy directors. Disaster management system and disaster management drill are the contents for military science teachers. Disaster education is the main contents for general teachers. Originality/value ‐ This paper considered mainstreaming school disaster management from the aspect of teacher training and application of training program to other countries.
    Disaster Prevention and Management 01/2014; 23(2).
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose ‐ The purpose of this paper is to assess the vulnerability of the Kesennuma area in Japan to a tsunami disaster and to map the area of inundation. Design/methodology/approach ‐ Digital elevation model (DEM) data and ALOS image were used to create maps of the parameters of this study area: elevation, slope, coastal proximity, river, and land use. An analytical hierarchy process was used to assign weights to each parameter and a spatial multi-criteria analysis was applied through cell-based modelling for vulnerability mapping. Findings ‐ The vulnerability map shows that 17.679?km2 of the area could be inundated by a tsunami. High vulnerability areas were mostly found in coastal areas with a sloping coast and a cape area. A low elevation and the presence of rivers or water channels are factors that increase the impact of tsunamis. Inundation areas were predicted to spread in areas identified as having either high vulnerability or slightly high vulnerability. Research limitations/implications ‐ Because of the limited geospatial data, the authors encourage further studies using DEM data with a high spatial resolution. Practical implications ‐ The results of this research can be used as basic information for disaster mitigation and urban planning in coastal areas. Originality/value ‐ This research creates a new approach for assessing which areas could be inundated by tsunamis, based on the vulnerability map generated through remote sensing and spatial multi-criteria analysis. Moreover, the parameters used are very close to those of actual inundation maps.
    Disaster Prevention and Management 01/2014; 23(3).
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose ‐ Satellite and airborne images are increasingly used at different stages of disaster management, especially in the detection of infrastructure damage. Although semi- or full automatic techniques to detect damage have been proposed, they have not been used in emergency situations. Damage maps produced by international organisations are still based on visual interpretation of images, which is time- and labour-consuming. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how an automatic mapping of damage can be helpful for a first and rapid assessment of building damage. Design/methodology/approach ‐ The study area is located in Port-au-Prince (Haiti) stricken by an earthquake in January 2010. To detect building damage, the paper uses optical images (15?cm of spatial resolution) coupled with height data (LiDAR, 1?m of spatial resolution). By undertaking an automatic object-oriented classification, the paper identifies three categories of building damages: intact buildings, collapsed buildings and debris. Findings ‐ Data processing for the study area covering 11?km2 took about 15 hours. The accuracy of the classification varies from 70 to 79 per cent depending to the methods of assessment. Causes of errors are numerous: limited spectral information of the optical images, resolution difference between the two data, high density of buildings but most importantly, certain types of building collapses could not be detected by vertically taken images (the case of data in this study). Originality/value ‐ The automatic damage mapping developed in this paper proves to be reliable and could be used in emergency situations. It could also be combined with manual visual interpretation to accelerate the planning of humanitarian rescues and reconstruction.
    Disaster Prevention and Management 01/2014; 23(1).
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose ‐ Improving older adults' preparedness for and response to natural disasters has become an important issue. Population ageing, together with concerns about increasing extreme weather-related events, has added further impetus to the need to reduce older adults' vulnerability to disasters. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the above issues. Design/methodology/approach ‐ Social and environmental influences on community dwelling independent older adults have not been accounted for in models of hazard adjustment, which have invariably used quantitative research methods. Findings ‐ To date much of the preparedness and response research has focused on organisational responses to preparedness, while perspectives from older adults have received less attention. Furthermore social and environmental influences on community dwelling independent older adults have not been accounted for in models of hazard adjustment. Originality/value ‐ Extending research to include qualitative methodologies, which recognises older adults as active participants in research about themselves, would contribute to increasing understandings about influences on disaster preparedness and response; and inform social policies and prevention programmes.
    Disaster Prevention and Management 01/2014; 23(3).
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose ‐ The purpose of this paper is to review research on gender and disasters in Japan, from the Kobe Earthquake to the Great East Japan Earthquake (GEJE). Gender perspectives were not adequately considered immediately after these disasters. Rather, disasters reinforced the gender roles prevalent in Japanese society. The paper seeks ways to position gender perspectives into mainstream thought on disaster management in Japan. Design/methodology/approach ‐ A literature review was conducted of secondary Japanese sources including peer-reviewed and non-academic journals published by governmental and non-governmental organisations after the Kobe, Niigata Chuetsu, and GEJEs. Popularly searched keywords were the Japanese for "gender" or "women", and "disasters". Findings ‐ A review of the published literature indicated that gender-related issues experienced during the Kobe Earthquake in 1995 and the Niigata Chuetsu Earthquake in 2004 were repeated following the GEJE in 2011. Japan has experienced numerous disasters; thus, the importance of gender perspectives has been gradually recognised and has received increased attention after the GEJE. This paper emphasises that these should be embedded at policy level and within disaster management structures to create disaster resilient communities. Originality/value ‐ To date, not much research in Japan, and none published in English, has reviewed gender- and disaster-related issues.
    Disaster Prevention and Management 01/2014; 23(2).
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose ‐ The purpose of this paper is to present the results of an original research project that explored the experiences and actions of immigrant and refugee communities during the 2011 Brisbane flood. It specifically examines the role of culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) community leaders who acted as "gatekeepers" in communicating emergency responses to the disaster to their communities. Design/methodology/approach ‐ Semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight "gatekeepers" who met the study's selection criteria. Findings ‐ The study found that the characteristics and demographics of CALD gatekeepers in Brisbane, their use of multiple sources related to their involvement in the community, their use of interpersonal sources for information-seeking and use of the mass media, is largely consistent with previous studies. Research limitations/implications ‐ This study departed from previous research with respect to issues of trust in government sources, gender and warning confirmation behaviour. These differences affected the behaviour of the CALD gatekeepers, especially around risk perception, information dissemination and filtering. Although the study points to the potential challenges facing emergency management services in fully incorporating the needs of all CALD communities, implications are limited given the small number of gatekeepers who agreed to be interviewed. Practical implications ‐ Despite its limitation, the study does indicate that a critical gap exists in understanding CALD community responses to natural disasters. Social implications ‐ The paper concludes with suggestions for a research agenda to gain better knowledge of the ethnic, demographic and personal factors that influence gatekeeping behaviour. Originality/value ‐ The study is original because no prior research has directed attention to Brisbane's CALD community responses to disasters.
    Disaster Prevention and Management 01/2014; 23(4).
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose ‐ The purpose of this paper is to present and apply a methodology that optimally assigns emergency response services (ERS) stations in Peloponnesus, Greece that was severely hit by wildfires in 2007, in an effort to describe the actual emergency response in this disaster and identify disaster management possibilities that can arise from the optimal allocation of the existing fire stations. Design/methodology/approach ‐ The methodology concerns the development of an objective function that aims to minimize maximum and average response times of ERS stations and the evaluation of developed scenarios. Simulated annealing is used for the minimization of the objective function, providing near-optimal solutions with low computation times for medium-scale networks. Findings ‐ The findings concern the comparison of average and maximum response times of ERS stations to hearths of fire, based on their actual and optimal allocation. They reveal an overall reduction in the average and maximum response time by 20 and 30 percent, respectively, for the entire region, while there is a reduction of 15 and 35 percent in the average and maximum response time for the locations affected by the 2007 wildfires. Research limitations/implications ‐ The methodology is formulated as a facility location problem with unitary demand and unlimited capacity in the stations, which means that the allocation does not take into account simultaneous events. Originality/value ‐ The paper fulfills an identified need to apply innovative research solutions to actual case studies in order to identify existing gaps and future disaster management possibilities.
    Disaster Prevention and Management 01/2014; 23(4).
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to assess the national implementation of disaster preparedness education in New Zealand primary schools through the dissemination of What’s the Plan, Stan?, a voluntary, curriculum-based teaching resource. Design/methodology/approach – Results and findings from a focus group study with school teachers and local civil defence staff in 2011 and a nationally representative survey of schools in 2012 were analyzed to identify intervening, facilitating and deterrent factors of uptake and use of the resource. Findings – The main intervening factors between resource promotion and school teachers’ awareness of the resource are word of mouth among school teachers and teachers’ proactive lesson plan research. The strongest facilitating factor was school-wide use of the resource. Lack of awareness of the resource and the perceived need for teacher training are the greatest deterrents to use of the resource. Practical implications – Based on the findings, several recommendations are provided for increasing use of the resource including use of web-based technology for teacher training, integration of disaster preparedness messaging into other children’s programs, ongoing evaluation and curriculum requirements. Originality/value – An evaluation of the implementation of What’s the Plan, Stan? adds to the limited body of knowledge on the benefits and challenges to distributing a voluntary teaching resource as a national strategy for curriculum integration of disaster education. The findings and lessons are relevant for nations meeting the Core Indicators of progress toward the 2005-2015 Hyogo Framework For Action.
    Disaster Prevention and Management 01/2014; 23(4):370-380.
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose ‐ The purpose of this paper is to present the findings that describe any correlations between leadership demographic characteristics with that of the levels of business continuity (BC) and disaster recovery (DR) planning by surveying the academic department's continuity planners at two major research universities in Southern California. Design/methodology/approach ‐ The research methodology was a quantitative method utilizing a correlational research design (logistic regression). Survey data from a self-reporting web-based survey were analyzed. Findings ‐ Analysis of five leadership demographic characteristics and four covariates reveals one statistically significant predictor of resiliency planning. Furthermore, close to one-quarter of the academic departments were found to have no BC or DR plan. Conversely, having a budget for resiliency planning was not found to be a significant predictor of resiliency planning. Research limitations/implications ‐ This study was specifically limited to continuity planners within two major, public, academic research institutions within Southern California. This allows for an in-depth understanding of a specific contingency planning phenomenon: geographically bounded public, research-oriented, higher education institutions. This study could provide a framework for administrative leaders in academic settings to assess their organizations' capacity for recovery from an unexpected business disruption. This study could assist university administration in identifying personnel to lead resiliency planning within the institution. Practical implications ‐ The research indicates that educational institutions lack in organizational resiliency planning. This study could provide a framework for administrative leaders in academic settings to assess their organizations' capacity for recovery from an unexpected business disruption. Originality/value ‐ While there is much literature on the separate topics of leadership in an academic environment and contingency planning, no study exists that attempts to observe any correlations between these concepts.
    Disaster Prevention and Management 01/2014; 23(3).
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose ‐ The purpose of this paper is to show that 2009 H1N1 "swine" influenza pandemic vaccination policies deviated from predictions established in the theory of political survival, and to propose that pandemic response deviated because it was ruled by bureaucratized experts rather than by elected politicians. Design/methodology/approach ‐ Focussing on the 2009 H1N1 pandemic, the paper employs descriptive statistical analysis of vaccination policies in nine western democracies. To probe the plausibility of the novel explanation, it uses quantitative and qualitative content analyses of media attention and coverage in two deviant cases, the USA and Denmark. Findings ‐ Theories linking political survival to disaster responses find little empirical support in the substantial cross-country variations of vaccination responses during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic. Rather than following a political logic, the case studies of media coverage in the USA and Denmark demonstrate that the response was bureaucratized in the public health agencies (CDC and DMHA, respectively). Hence, while natural disaster responses appear to follow a political logic, the response to pandemics appears to be more strongly instituted in the hands of bureaucratic experts. Research limitations/implications ‐ There is an added value of encompassing bureaucratic dynamics in political theories of disaster response; bureaucratized expertise proved to constitute a strong plausible explanation of the 2009 pandemic vaccination response. Practical implications ‐ Pandemic preparedness and response depends critically on understanding the lessons of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic; a key lesson supported by this paper is that expert-based agencies rather than political leaders are the pivotal actors. Originality/value ‐ This paper is the first to pinpoint the limitations of political survival theories of disaster responses with respect to the 2009 pandemic. Further, it is among the few to analyze the causes of variations in cross-country pandemic vaccination policies during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic.
    Disaster Prevention and Management 01/2014; 23(1).
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose – Drought monitoring is an important process for national agricultural and environmental planning. Droughts are normal recurring climatic phenomena that affect people and landscapes. They occur at different scales (locally, regionally, and nationally), and for periods of time ranging from weeks to decades. In Zimbabwe drought is increasingly becoming an annual phenomenon, with varying parts of the country being affected. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the spatial variations in the seasonal occurrences of drought in Zimbabwe over a period of five years. Design/methodology/approach – The Vegetation Condition Index (VCI), which shows how close the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index of the current time is to the minimum Normalized Difference Vegetation Index calculated from the long-term record for that given time, was used to monitor drought occurrence in Zimbabwe. A time series of dekadal Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, calculated from SPOT images, was used to compute seasonal VCI maps from 2005 to 2010. The VCI maps were then classified into three drought severity classes (severe, moderate, and mild) based on the relative changes in the vegetation condition from extremely bad to optimal. Findings – The results showed that droughts occur annually in Zimbabwe though, on average, the droughts are mostly mild. The occurrence and the spatial distribution of drought in Zimbabwe was also found to be random affecting different places from season to season thus the authors conclude that most parts of the country are drought prone. Originality/value – Remote sensing technologies utilising such indices as the VCI can be used for drought monitoring in Zimbabwe.
    Disaster Prevention and Management 01/2014; 23(5):649 - 659.