Cell Transplantation (CELL TRANSPLANT )

Publisher: Cell Transplant Society

Description

Cell Transplantation publishes original, peer-reviewed research and review articles on the subject of cell transplantation and its application to human diseases. To ensure high-quality contributions from all areas of transplantation, separate section editors and editorial boards have been established. Articles deal with a wide range of topics including physiological, medical, preclinical, tissue engineering, and device-oriented aspects of transplantation of nervous system, endocrine, growth factor-secreting, bone marrow, epithelial, endothelial, and genetically engineered cells, among others. Basic clinical studies and immunological research papers are also featured. To provide complete coverage of this revolutionary field, Cell Transplantation will report on relevant technological advances, and ethical and regulatory considerations of cell transplants.

  • Impact factor
    4.42
    Show impact factor history
     
    Impact factor
  • 5-year impact
    3.98
  • Cited half-life
    4.20
  • Immediacy index
    0.43
  • Eigenfactor
    0.01
  • Article influence
    0.80
  • Website
    Cell Transplantation website
  • Other titles
    Cell transplantation
  • ISSN
    0963-6897
  • OCLC
    25644585
  • Material type
    Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The role of the novel costimulatory molecule TIM4 in anti‐islet response is unknown. We explored TIM4 expression and targeting in Th1 (BALB/c islets into C57BL/6 mice) and Th2 (BALB/c islets into Tbet‐/‐ C57BL/6 mice) models of anti‐islet alloimmune response and in a model of anti‐islet autoimmune response (diabetes onset in NOD mice). The targeting of TIM4, using the monoclonal antibody RMT4‐53, promotes islet graft survival in a Th1 model, with 30% of the graft surviving in the long‐term; islet graft protection appears mediated by a Th1 to Th2 skewing of the immune response. Differently, in the Th2 model, TIM4 targeting precipitates graft rejection by further enhancing the Th2 response. The effect of anti‐TIM4 treatment in preventing autoimmune diabetes was marginal with only minor Th1 to Th2 skewing. B‐cell depletion abolished the effect of TIM4 targeting. TIM4 is expressed on human B‐cells and is upregulated in diabetic and islet‐transplanted patients. Our data suggest a model in which TIM4 targeting promotes Th2 response over Th1 via B‐cells. The targeting of TIM4 could become a component of an immunoregulatory protocol in clinical islet transplantation, aiming at redirecting the immune system toward a Th2 response.
    Cell Transplantation 03/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Huntington’s disease (HD) produces severe neurodegeneration in the striatum leading to disabling motor impairments, including the loss of control of skilled reaching movements. Fetal GABAergic transplants can physically replace the lost striatal cells but with only partial success in functional recovery. Here, we aimed to determine the extent and quality of the repair produced by fetal cell transplantation through an in-depth analysis of reaching behavior in the quinolinic acid-lesioned rat model of HD. Control, quinolinic acid-lesioned plus sham graft, and quinolinic acid-lesioned plus graft groups of rats were assessed in skilled reaching performance prior to and following lesion surgery and 3 months following injection of 400,000 fetal whole ganglionic eminence-derived cells into the striatum. This was compared to their performance in two more rudimentary tests of motor function (the adjusting step and vibrissae-evoked hand-placing tests). Grafted rats demonstrated a significant improvement in reaching success rate (graft +59%, shamTX +3%). Importantly, the quality of reaching behavior, including all components of the movement, was fully restored with no identifiable differences in the normal behavior shown by control rats. Postmortem immunohistochemical examination verified the survival of large intrastriatal grafts, and Fluoro-Gold tracing indicated appropriate outgrowth to the globus pallidus. Our study illustrates for the first time the detailed analysis of qualitative improvement of motor function following brain repair in a rat model of HD. The results demonstrate significant improvements not only in gross movements but also in the skilled motor patterns lost during HD. Fetal GABAergic cell transplantation showed a demonstrable ability to restore motor function to near normal levels, such that there were few differences from intact control animals, an effect not observed in standard tests of motor function.
    Cell Transplantation 01/2013; 22(10).
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    ABSTRACT: The self-healing potential of each tissue belongs to endogenous stem cells residing in the tissue; however, there are currently no reports mentioned for the isolation of human rotator cuff-derived mesenchymal stem cells (RC-MSCs) since. To isolate RC-MSCs, minced rotator cuff samples were first digested with enzymes and the single cell suspensions were seeded in plastic culture dishes. Twenty-four hours later, nonadherent cells were removed and the adherent cells were further cultured. The RC-MSCs had fibroblast-like morphology and were positive for the putative surface markers of MSCs, such as CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105, and CD166, and negative for the putative markers of hematopoietic cells, such as CD34, CD45, and CD133. Similar to BM-MSCs, RC-MSCs were demonstrated to have the potential to undergo osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic differentiation. Upon induction in the defined media, RC-MSCs also expressed lineage-specific genes, such as Runx 2 and osteocalcin in osteogenic induction, PPAR-γ and LPL in adipogenic differentiation, and aggrecan and Col2a1 in chondrogenic differentiation. The multipotent feature of RC-MSCs in the myogenic injury model was further strengthened by the increase in myogenic potential both in vitro and in vivo when compared with BM-MSCs. These results demonstrate the successful isolation of MSCs from human rotator cuffs and encourage the application of RC-MSCs in myogenic regeneration.
    Cell Transplantation 01/2013; 22(3).
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    ABSTRACT: Emerging evidence suggests that cell therapy with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has beneficial effects on the injured heart. However, the decreased survival and/or adhesion of MSCs under ischemic conditions limits the application of cell transplantation as a therapeutic modality. We investigated a potential method of increasing the adhesion ability of MSCs to improve their efficacy in the ischemic heart. Treatment of MSCs with PKC activator, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), increased cell adhesion and spreading in a dose-dependent method and significantly decreased detachment. When MSCs were treated with PKC inhibitor, that is, rottlerin, adhesion of MSCs was slightly diminished, and detachment was also decreased compared to the treatment with PMA. MSCs treated with both PMA and rottlerin behaved similarly to normal controls. In 3D matrix cardiogel, treatment with PMA increased the number of MSCs compared to the control group and MSCs treated with rottlerin. Expressions of focal adhesion kinase, cytoskeleton-associated proteins, and integrin subunits were clearly demonstrated in PMA-treated MSCs by immunoblotting and/or immunocytochemistry. The effect of PKC activator treatment on MSCs was validated in vivo. Following injection into rat hearts, the PMA-treated MSCs exhibited significantly higher retention in infarcted myocardium compared to the MSC group. Infarct size, fibrosis area, and apoptotic cells were reduced, and cardiac function was improved in rat hearts injected with PMA-treated MSCs compared to sham and/or MSC-implanted group. These results indicate that PKC activator is a potential target for niche manipulation to enhance adhesion of MSCs for cardiac regeneration.
    Cell Transplantation 01/2013; 22(5).
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    ABSTRACT: Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have differentiation, immunomodulatory, and self-renewal properties and are, therefore, an attractive tool for regenerative medicine and autoimmune diseases. MSCs may be of great value to treat graft-versus-host disease. Influenza virus causes highly contagious seasonal infection and occasional pandemics. The infection is severe in children, elderly, and immunocompromised hosts including hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients. The objective of this study was to determine if MSCs are permissive to influenza virus replication. We isolated MSCs from the bone marrow of 4- to 6-week-old germ-free pigs. Swine and human influenza virus strains were used to infect MSCs in vitro. MSCs expressed known influenza virus α-2,3 and α-2,6 sialic acid receptors and supported replication of swine and human influenza viruses. Viral infection of MSCs resulted in cell lysis and proinflammatory cytokine production. These findings demonstrate that bone marrow-derived MSCs are susceptible to influenza virus. The data also suggest that transplantation of bone marrow MSCs from influenza virus-infected donors may transmit infection to recipients. Also, MSCs may get infected if infused into a patient with an ongoing influenza virus infection.
    Cell Transplantation 01/2013; 22(3).
  • Cell Transplantation 01/2013; 22(5):916-916.
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    ABSTRACT: Our previous study indicated that electroacupuncture (EA) could increase neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) levels in the injured spinal cord, stimulate the differentiation of transplanted bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and improve functional recovery in the injured spinal cord of rats. However, the number of neuron-like cells derived from the MSCs is limited. It is known that NT-3 promotes the survival and differentiation of neurons by preferentially binding to its receptor TrkC. In this study, we attempted to transplant TrkC gene-modified MSCs (TrkC-MSCs) into the spinal cord with transection to investigate whether EA treatment could promote NT-3 secretion in the injured spinal cord and to determine whether increased NT-3 could further enhance transplanted MSCs overexpressing TrkC to differentiate into neuron-like cells, resulting in increased axonal regeneration and functional improvement in the injured spinal cord. Our results showed that EA increased NT-3 levels; furthermore, it promoted neuron-phenotype differentiation, synaptogenesis, and myelin formation of transplanted TrkC-MSCs. In addition, TrkC-MSC transplantation combined with EA (the TrkC-MSCs + EA group) treatment promoted the growth of the descending BDA-labeled corticospinal tracts (CSTs) and 5-HT-positive axonal regeneration across the lesion site into the caudal cord. In addition, the conduction of cortical motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) and hindlimb locomotor function increased as compared to controls (treated with the LacZ-MSCs, TrkC-MSCs, and LacZ-MSCs + EA groups). In the TrkC-MSCs + EA group, the injured spinal cord also showed upregulated expression of the proneurogenic factors laminin and GAP-43 and downregulated GFAP and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs), major inhibitors of axonal growth. Together, our data suggest that TrkC-MSC transplantation combined with EA treatment spinal cord injury not only increased MSC survival and differentiation into neuron-like cells but also promoted CST regeneration across injured sites to the caudal cord and functional improvement, perhaps due to increase of NT-3 levels, upregulation of laminin and GAP-43, and downregulation of GFAP and CSPG proteins.
    Cell Transplantation 01/2013; 22(1).
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    ABSTRACT: Leukodystrophies are a group of disorders characterized by myelin dysfunction, either at the level of myelin formation or maintenance, that affect the central nervous system (CNS) and also in some cases, to a lesser extent, the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Although these genetic-based disorders are generally rare, all together they have a significant impact in the society, with an estimated overall incidence of 1 in 7,663 live births. Currently, there is no cure for leukodystrophies, and the development of effective treatments remains challenging. Not only leukodystrophies generally progress very fast, but also most are multifocal needing the simultaneous targeting at multiple sites. Moreover, as the CNS is affected, the blood‐brain barrier (BBB) limits the efficacy of treatment. Recently, interest on cell therapy has increased, and the leukodystrophies for which metabolic correction is needed have become first-choice candidates for cell-based clinical trials. In this review, we present and discuss the available cell transplantation therapies in metabolic leukodystrophies including fucosidosis, X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, metachromatic leukodystrophy, Canavan disease, and Krabbe's disease. We will discuss the latest advances of cell therapy and its pitfalls in this group of disorders, taking into account, among others, the limitations imposed by reduced cell migration in multifocal conditions, the need to achieve corrective enzyme threshold levels, and the growing awareness that not only myelin but also the associated axonopathy needs to be targeted in some leukodystrophies.
    Cell Transplantation 01/2013; 22(2).
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    ABSTRACT: Islet autotransplant patients represent excellent subjects to assess the posttransplant impact of islet precursors, as chronic pancreatitis (CP) causes an elevation of ductal cells, pancreatic precursors cells, and hormone-positive acinar cells. The relationship between these cell types and autograft outcomes should be more apparent than would be the case in the context of an allograft program with confounding immunological variables. To improve diabetic control following total pancreatectomy for CP, nonpurified islets were autotransplanted into the liver. Pancreas specimens were recovered from 23 patients and stained for antigens including: insulin, glucagon, cytokeratin 19, cytokeratin 7, and PDX-1. In line with previous reports, the prevalence of ductal cells, non-islet endocrine cells and non-islet PDX-1-expressing cells was significantly higher in CP glands compared with normal pancreata. When correlating follow-up data (i.e., fasting and stimulated C-peptide/glucose levels and HbA1c%) with pancreas immunoreactivity, high levels of ductal cells, non-islet PDX-1-positive cells, and non-islet glucagon-positive cells were associated with superior outcomes, detectable up to 2 years posttransplant. To conclude, the acinar parenchyma and ductal epithelium of the CP pancreas show an upregulation of both endocrine and pre-endocrine cell types, which appear to have a positive effect on islet graft outcomes in autotransplantation setting.
    Cell Transplantation 01/2013; 22(6).
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    ABSTRACT: The results of uncontrolled, open-label clinical trials indicate that reconstructive cellular therapies have the capacity to produce meaningful functional improvements in patients with brain disorders. However, the transplantation of fetal cells has not progressed to viable best practice treatment for any brain disorder. A conceptual approach, referred to as the Repair Model, has served as a useful heuristic for initiating research in the field and guiding the development of new practices. Analysis of evidence for the treatment of Parkinson's disease indicates that recovery following neural grafting is a complex process influenced by factors beyond the replacement of neurons. An alternative approach, the Composite Brain Model, is outlined to address limitations of the Repair Model. A hierarchical, open-system model is proposed, which aims to track the interactions between the grafted cells, the host brain, and the environment. The Composite Brain Model emphasizes the importance of the interactions between the patient, their physical and social environment, and the provision of rehabilitation during recovery. It is proposed that the Composite Brain Model is useful in providing an alternative perspective for research, theory building, and practice.
    Cell Transplantation 01/2013; 22(3).
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    ABSTRACT: Annual influenza vaccine is recommended for organ transplant recipients, but immunogenicity is known to be suboptimal. Islet transplant recipients receive immunosuppressive therapy, but there are no data on the immunogenicity of influenza vaccine in this population. In this prospective cohort study, adult islet transplant recipients at least 3 months posttransplant were enrolled. All patients received the 2010‐2011 seasonal influenza vaccine. Serum was obtained pre- and postvaccination to determine humoral response to each of the three influenza strains included in the vaccine. Adverse effects of vaccine were also noted. A total of 61 islet transplant recipients were enrolled and completed the study protocol. The median time from last transplant was 1.9 years (range 0.26‐11.4 years), and most patients had undergone multiple prior islet transplant procedures (90.2%). Overall immunogenicity of the vaccine was poor. Seroconversion rates to H1N1, H3N2, and B antigens were 34.4%, 29.5%, and 9.8%, respectively. In the subset not seroprotected at baseline, a protective antibody titer postvaccination was achieved in 58.6%, 41.9%, and 34.5% of patients, respectively. Patients within the first year of transplant were significantly less likely to seroconvert to at least one antigen (23.5% vs. 54.5%; p = 0.029). Alemtuzumab recipients trended toward lower seroconversion rates (25% vs. 51%; p = 0.11). No vaccine-related safety concerns were identified. Seasonal influenza vaccine had suboptimal immunogenicity in islet transplant recipients especially those who were less than 1 year posttransplant or had received alemtuzumab induction. Novel strategies for protection in this group of patients need further study.
    Cell Transplantation 01/2013; 22(3).
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    ABSTRACT: Human amniotic mesenchymal cells (HAM cells) are known to contain somatic stem cells possessing the characteristics of pluripotency. However, little is known about the biology of these somatic cells because isolated HAM cells from amniotic membrane have a limited lifespan. To overcome this problem, we attempted to prolong the lifespan of HAM cells by infecting retrovirus encoding human papillomavirus type16E6 and E7 (HPV16E6E7), bmi-1, and/or human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) genes and investigated their characteristics as stem cells. We confirmed the immortalization of the four lines of cultured HAM cells for about 1 year. Immortalized human amnion mesenchymal cells (iHAM cells) have continued to proliferate over 200 population doublings (PDs). iHAM cells were positive for CD73, CD90, CD105, and CD44 and negative for CD34, CD14, CD45, and HLA-DR. They expressed stem cell markers such as Oct3/4, Sox2, Nanog, Klf4, SSEA4, c-myc, vimentin, and nestin. They showed adipogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic differentiation abilities after induction. These results suggested that immortalized cell lines with characteristics of stem cells can be established. iHAM cells with an extended lifespan can be used to produce good experimental models both in vitro and in vivo.
    Cell Transplantation 01/2013; 22(2).
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    ABSTRACT: Periodontal ligament cell (PDLC) sheets have been shown to contribute to periodontal tissue regeneration. Dental follicle cells (DFCs), acknowledged as the precursor cells of PDLCs, have demonstrated stemness, embryonic features, heterogeneity, and pluripotency. Therefore, we hypothesized that DFC sheets might be more effective and suitable for periodontal tissue regeneration than PDLC sheets. In this study, we compared the biological characteristics of DFC sheets and PDLC sheets in vitro. To investigate the potential for periodontal tissue regeneration in vivo, complexes composed of two types of cell sheets combined with dentin matrix were implanted subcutaneously into nude mice for 6 weeks. Our results showed that, when forming cell sheets, DFCs secreted richer extracellular matrix than PDLCs. And compared to DFCs, DFC sheets expressed high levels of calcification-related genes, including alkaline phosphatase (alp), bone sialoprotein (bsp), osteopontin (opn), runt-related transcription factor (runx2), as well as the periodontal ligament-specific genes collagen III (col III) and periostin, while the gene expression of bsp, osteocalcin (ocn), and opn were greatly increased in PDLC sheets, when compared to PDLCs. col I expression did not change significantly. However, cementum protein 23 (cp-23) expression increased several fold in PDLC sheets compared to PDLCs but decreased in DFC sheets compared to DFCs. DFC and PDLC sheets were both positive for Collagen I (Col I), cementum attachment protein (CAP), ALP, BSP, OCN, and OPN protein expression, and Col I, ALP, BSP, and OPN expression were increased after cell sheets were formed. Furthermore, the levels of laminin and fibronectin were higher in DFCs and DFC sheets than that of PDLCs and PDLC sheets, respectively. In vivo, DFC and PDLC sheets could both regenerate periodontal tissue-like structures, but DFC sheets demonstrated stronger periodontal regeneration potential than PDLC sheets. Therefore, DFC sheets derived from discarded dental follicle tissue after tooth extraction may be more advantageous for clinical periodontal tissue regeneration in the future.
    Cell Transplantation 01/2013; 22(6).
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    ABSTRACT: The present study was designed to evaluate the safety and potential of adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs) for the treatment of Crohn's fistula. In this dose escalation study, patients were sequentially enrolled into three dosing groups with at least three patients per group. The first three patients (group 1) were given 1 × 107 cells/ml. After 4 weeks, this dose was deemed safe, and so an additional four patients (group 2) were given 2 × 107 cells/ml. Four weeks later, after which this second dose was deemed safe, a third and final group of three patients were given 4 × 107 cells/ml. Each patient was followed for a minimum of 8 weeks. Patients who showed complete healing at week 8 were followed up for an additional 6 months. Efficacy endpoint was complete healing at week 8 after injection, defined as complete closure of the fistula track and internal and external openings without drainage or signs of inflammation. There were no grade 3 or 4 severity adverse events, and there were no adverse events related to the study drug. Two patients in group 2, treated with 2 × 107 ASCs/ml, showed complete healing at week 8 after injection. Of the three patients enrolled in group 3, treated with 4 × 107 ASCs/ml, one showed complete healing. Outcome in another patient was assessed as partial healing due to incomplete closure of the external opening, although the inside of fistula track was filled considerably and there was no drainage. All three patients with complete healing at week 8 showed a sustained effect without recurrence 8 months after injection. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the tolerability, safety, and potential efficacy of ASCs for the treatment of Crohn's fistula and provides support for further clinical study.
    Cell Transplantation 01/2013; 22(2).
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    ABSTRACT: At present, there are still significant barriers that impede the clinical use of hESCs and iPS cells, including ethics, immunorejection, tumorigenesis from hESCs, and teratoma formation from iPS cells. It is therefore necessary to search for alternative sources of stem cells. WJ-MSCs originate from embryonic epiblasts and possess properties intermediate between hESCs and adult stem cells. However, the stemness properties of molecules in WJ-MSCs remain unclear compared to those of hESCs. In the present study, we isolated WJ-MSCs by a nonenzymatic method. Further, using microarray analysis by Affymetrix GeneChip and functional network analyses, we determined the degree of expression of stemness genes exhibited by the Human Stem Cell Pluripotency array. We also defined a wide range of stem cell gene expression in the WJ-MSCs in comparison with hESCs. At the same time, the definitive markers of early cardiac precursor cells and more committed progenitors were further characterized in WJ-MSCs. Our results demonstrated for the first time that WJ-MSCs had significant expression of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cell core markers, such as SOX2, NANOG, LIN28, SSEA1, SSEA3, SSEA4, KLF4, c-MYC, CRIPTO, and REX1, with a relatively lower level of expression than in hESCs. We also found WJ-MSCs have high expression of early cardiac transcription factors, such as Flk-1, Isl-1, and Nkx2.5. Functional analysis revealed signature genes of WJ-MSCs with specific roles involved in immune, cytoskeletal, and chemokine regulation, cell adhesion, and cell signaling. Our study indicated that there is a significant overlap between the stemness genes expressed by hESCs and WJ-MSCs. WJ-MSCs harbor a true stem cell population and are promising cells for stem cell-based therapies.
    Cell Transplantation 01/2013; 22(10).
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    ABSTRACT: Multipotent adult progenitor cells (MAPCs) are bone marrow-derived nonhematopoietic stem cells with a broad differentiation potential and extensive expansion capacity. A comparative study between human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and human MAPCs (hMAPCs) has shown that hMAPCs have clearly distinct phenotypical and functional characteristics from hMSCs. In particular, hMAPCs express lower levels of MHC class I than hMSCs and cannot only differentiate into typical mesenchymal cell types but can also differentiate in vitro and in vivo into functional endothelial cells. The use of hMSCs as cellular immunomodulatory stem cell products gained much interest since their immunomodulatory capacities in vitro became evident over the last decade. Currently, the clinical grade stem cell product of hMAPCs is already used in clinical trials to prevent graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), as well as for the treatment of acute myocardial infarct, ischemic stroke, and Crohn’s disease. Therefore, we studied the immune phenotype, immunogenicity, and immunosuppressive effect of hMAPCs in vitro. We demonstrated that hMAPCs are nonimmunogenic for T-cell proliferation and cytokine production. In addition, hMAPCs exert strong immunosuppressive effects on T-cell alloreactivity and on T-cell proliferation induced by mitogens and recall antigens. This immunomodulatory effect was not MHC restricted, which makes off-the-shelf use promising. The immunosuppressive effect of hMAPCs is partially mediated via soluble factors and dependent on indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) activity. At last, we isolated hMAPCs, the clinical grade stem cell product of hMAPCs, named MultiStem, and hMSCs from one single donor and observed that both the immunogenicity and the immunosuppressive capacities of all three stem cell products are comparable in vitro. In conclusion, hMAPCs have potent immunomodulatory properties in vitro and can serve as a valuable cell source for the clinical use of immunomodulatory cellular stem cell product.
    Cell Transplantation 01/2013; 22(10).

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