Human Resource Management Journal (Hum Resource Manag J )

Publisher: Industrial Relations Services, Blackwell Publishing

Description

Human Resource Management Journal is a scholarly journal which seeks to promote the understanding of HRM to academics and practicing managers. It aims to provide an international forum for discussion and debate and to stress the critical importance of people management to wider economic, political and social concerns. The journal is essential reading for everyone involved in personnel, training and human resource management and is the only HRM journal to be endorsed by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development. From 2006, HRMJ has also broadened its editorial scope to become more globally orientated and has strengthened the international character of its Editorial Board. HRMJ seeks to publish scholarly articles on any aspect of employment studies but especially those focused on issues related to the management of people at work. Articles should make a substantive contribution to contemporary issues, incorporate good use of theory and research, and offer well-founded conclusions with practical implications. The journal is particularly interested in articles which will appeal to an international readership. Critical reviews are also welcomed, especially those pointing to how theory and practice can be developed further.

  • Impact factor
    1.39
  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
    0.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.11
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.00
  • Website
    Human Resource Management Journal website
  • Other titles
    Human resource management journal (Online)
  • ISSN
    0954-5395
  • OCLC
    60625911
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Blackwell Publishing

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • Some journals impose embargoes typically of 6 or 12 months, occasionally of 24 months
    • no listing of affected journals available as yet
  • Conditions
    • See Wiley-Blackwell entry for articles after February 2007
    • Publisher version cannot be used
    • On author or institutional or subject-based server
    • Server must be non-commercial
    • Publisher copyright and source must be acknowledged with set statement ("The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com ")
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • 'Blackwell Publishing' is an imprint of 'Wiley-Blackwell'
  • Classification
    ​ yellow

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Knowledge‐intensive firms need to leverage their individual knowledge assets via knowledge sharing to create collective knowledge resources. This process is, however, in the control of the knowledge worker. We explore this personal and emotive quality of knowledge sharing by asking: ‘How does employee commitment impact on knowledge sharing?’ We study professional service firms operating in cross‐boundary environments and examine the impact of commitment to the organisation, profession, team and client on knowledge sharing. The article contributes directly to our understanding of the interrelationship between (a) the types and foci of commitment and (b) bidirectional knowledge sharing.
    Human Resource Management Journal 07/2014; 24(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article examines the mismatches between supply of skills and attributes of immigrants and the demands of employers that influence workplace integration of skilled immigrants in Australia. It argues that, despite being skilled, immigrants still cannot meet the requirements of employers in doing their jobs effectively. There are mismatches, which happen mainly in the aspects of English proficiency, qualification and culture. The study followed a qualitative research design taking skilled immigrants from IT and engineering professional backgrounds and their employers in Australia as the interviewees. The results confirm that the workplace integration of immigrants is not only affected by the inherent capacities of immigrants, but the mindset of employers and their perception towards immigrants' overall qualities also manipulate the process. The results are, however, indicative only, as the study is confined to IT and engineering professional groups, and does not report the experiences of other immigrants.
    Human Resource Management Journal 07/2014; 24(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Using 7 years of data representing the Canadian private sector, we estimate the effects of the major components of compensation on a rarely studied form of employee performance: innovation. Although there are some limitations inherent in the data, our results indicate the complex motivation required for consistent innovation success. Surprisingly, we find that fixed pay (salary) and individual performance pay have no effect on innovation, while variable group pay and indirect pay (employee benefits) have a positive effect. In other words, our results suggest that you can pay employees to innovate, provided that you select the right compensation incentives.
    Human Resource Management Journal 07/2014; 24(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: How can managers improve the alignment of organisational and individual interests in the management of human resources? This article integrates a diverse set of literatures to propose three tests of mutuality in employment relationships: (a) the quality of the match between the organisation's needs for human capabilities and the individual's needs to deploy and develop them; (b) the extent to which the organisation's dual needs for commitment and flexibility are aligned with the needs of individuals for security and community; and (c) the extent to which both parties feel they are making a worthwhile return on their investment. These tests form a starting point for assessing and modelling the quality of employment relationships in particular contexts.
    Human Resource Management Journal 01/2013; 23(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Despite the increased attention paid to the role and effects of migrant labour in the contemporary economy, there has been insufficient attention to the role of employers and the employment relationship. Recent studies have highlighted distinctive labour power characteristics of new labour migrants from Central and Eastern Europe that make them ‘good workers’ in the eyes of employers. Drawing on multiple case studies across the supermarket supply chain, this article explores what kind of human resource migrant labour is perceived to be, particularly by employers, and what happens in practice as the dynamic tensions of the employment relationship unfolds in particular sector contexts. It argues that utilisation is conditioned more by the requirements of temporal flexibility – framed by the dynamics of employment within the supply chain – than any essential features of migrant labour power.
    Human Resource Management Journal 01/2013; 23(2).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Talent and performance management are becoming a key strategic HRM issue for universities. This study adds to our knowledge by critically examining recruitment and selection practices for junior and senior academic talent in the Netherlands. We show that academic subfields differ in terms of how appointments are organised, how candidates are sought and identified and how performance indicators play a role in recruitment. We identify three key dilemmas in talent and performance management for universities: (a) transparency versus autonomy, (b) power of HR versus power of academics, (c) equality versus homogeneity. This article challenges the view of an academic world where the allocation of rewards and resources is governed by the normative principles of transparency and objective performance systems, and it highlights the distance between these HRM instruments and the actuality of social interaction in academic recruitment practices.
    Human Resource Management Journal 01/2013; 23(2).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study examines how the institutional distance between a host country and a home country influences foreign subsidiary staffing, and how overseas business experience moderates the effect of institutional distance. Hypotheses regarding the effect of institutional distance on foreign subsidiary staffing are empirically tested using a sample of 2,980 foreign subsidiaries of Japanese firms. This study shows that although the ratio of parent country nationals to subsidiary employees decreases when firms face greater institutional distance, the absolute number of parent country nationals assigned to the subsidiary increases. This study also shows that firms with more overseas business experience replace host country nationals with parent country nationals when there is greater institutional distance.
    Human Resource Management Journal 01/2013; 23(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Appearance of disinterestedness is a social norm that has long been recognised by social scientists as essential to the development of social exchange relationships. Despite the predominance of social exchange theory within the field of management, management scholars have so far largely overlooked the role of this norm in their models. This study aims to fill this gap by investigating how employees' attribution of disinterested organisational support (i.e. support perceived by employees as not resulting from an underlying calculation) is related to employee retention. The hypotheses were tested in a longitudinal study of 151 management‐level employees. Results showed that perceptions of disinterested support decrease employee voluntary turnover through enhancing perceptions of organisational support and organisational commitment, and lessening turnover intention.
    Human Resource Management Journal 01/2013; 23(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Research on senior executive reward has typically explored the connection between pay, performance and the alignment of interests of executives and shareholders. This article examines the relationship between reward and motivation, drawing on the psychological, behavioural economics and decision‐making literatures. Based on an empirical study of FTSE 350 senior executives, the research examines whether long‐term incentive plans are an effective and efficient way of motivating executives, taking into account risk, time discounting, uncertainty and fairness. The article concludes that the way executives frame choices, perceive value, assess probability, evaluate temporal effects and respond to uncertainty means that long‐term incentive plans (LTIPs) are generally not efficient and are often not effective in meeting their objectives. It proposes that, in its current form, agency theory does not provide a sound basis for modelling senior executive reward, and suggests five areas for development.
    Human Resource Management Journal 01/2013; 23(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this article is to illustrate empirically how HR practices are configured to manage multidimensional knowledge assets. It contributes directly to the configurational approaches to HRM by identifying HRM systems that are used to manage various types of knowledge assets. First, we develop a framework from theory to categorise knowledge assets into human (industry and firm specific), social (entrepreneurial and co‐operative) and organisational capital (mechanistic and organic). Within this framework, we draw on data gathered in the 12 professional services firms to understand how HR practices enable the management of each knowledge asset. We identify two configurations of HR practices (organisationally and professionally focused). These configurations do not exist in isolation but are used simultaneously by organisations via either a targeted (different practices in different parts of the organisation) or a temporally segregated way (different practices for the same group of employees over time).
    Human Resource Management Journal 01/2013; 23(2).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article explores the psychological contract of female clerical homeworkers who work from home full-time and are employed at a local authority. Qualitative interviews were carried out with homeworkers and their supervisors. Temporal flexibility was desired by all the homeworkers in order to achieve a better work–life balance, and was deemed important by women without children as well as those with childcare responsibilities. Our findings highlight that homeworkers were able to negotiate their own idiosyncratic deals with line managers in order to attain their desired levels of temporal flexibility. However, the issue of flexibility remains ambiguous with some supervisory staff being more comfortable with the concept than others, leading to some homeworkers enjoying different levels of temporal flexibility than their co-workers. Our findings suggest that employees perceive flexibility idiosyncratic deals of co-workers as fair as long as they achieve their own personal levels of temporal flexibility. The potential implications for organisations are discussed.
    Human Resource Management Journal 01/2013; 23(2):211-225.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In this article, we examine the dynamics of trust in the triadic relationship between HR, employees and managers when dealing with allegations of workplace bullying. Previous research has shown employees to be dissatisfied with HR practitioners' responses to complaints of workplace bullying, and we explore the novel angle of the HR practitioners' perspective through semistructured interviews. Paralleling extant employee accounts, the findings suggest that HR practitioners rarely judge situations as bullying where a manager is accused. Trust between employee, manager and HR practitioner is essential for the successful resolution of bullying claims, yet this study suggests multiple directions of distrust. By virtue of their role alignment and previous experiences of handling bullying, HR practitioners were found to prioritise their relationships with managers, automatically distrusting employees' bullying claims. Despite also distrusting managers to effectively deliver HRM practices, it appears that bullying complaints are ‘too hot to handle’ for HR practitioners given the risks to their relationships with managers.
    Human Resource Management Journal 01/2012; 22(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article examines the interaction of regulation and employee voice in the residential aged care sector. In particular, it considers the regulatory forces shaping the expression of voice in the human services sector through the examination of three aged care providers. It suggests that in a sector characterised by low levels of unionisation and a preponderance of non‐union workplaces, employee voice does not act as a significant regulator of managerial decision‐making, rather a combination of external and internal constraints that regulates the expression of voice. This study identifies the regulatory role of location, labour law and social norms. It also highlights that the importance of these constraints will vary in different organisational contexts and as a consequence of interaction with internal regulation. Such internal regulation is most commonly expressed through the exercise of managerial prerogative.
    Human Resource Management Journal 01/2012; 22(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article advances discussions surrounding the extent to which senior management can rebuild damaged trust relationships in a context where the founding principle of respect had been contravened. More specifically, our article is concerned with a senior management team's attempt to regain trust through addressing workplace bullying. The study draws on a quantitative methodology where the population of the case study organisation were surveyed (n = 206) at two points in time (2004 and 2007). The findings revealed that managements’ actions had a significant effect on perceptions of bullying. T‐tests, however, provided only partial support for the notion that trust had improved as a result of management actions. In particular, there were significant differences in the levels of loyalty and benevolent motives and also openness, whereas no significant changes were observed for other dimensions of trust (integrity, competence, consistency and respect).
    Human Resource Management Journal 01/2012; 22(2).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The roles played by managers in exercising workplace discipline have been of long‐standing academic interest. However, relatively little attention has been paid to the way that the distinctive functions of operational managers and HR practitioners may interact and shape the nature and outcomes of disciplinary procedures and processes. This article examines this through a series of organisational case studies. It suggests that dimensions of control between operational managers and HR practitioners are fundamental to understanding the nature of workplace discipline. Furthermore, it argues that this relationship is crucial in determining the prospects for a shift towards greater flexibility in the management of discipline, as called for by Gibbons and reinforced by the Employment Act 2008. Therefore, findings suggest that questions of managerial preparedness to embrace this new agenda must also consider the role played by HR practitioners in embedding a culture of formality.
    Human Resource Management Journal 01/2012; 22(3).