Educational Media International (Educ Media Int )

Publisher: International Council for Educational Media, Taylor & Francis

Description

Educational media has made a considerable impact on schools, colleges and providers of open and distance education. This journal provides an international forum for the exchange of information and views on new developments in educational and mass media. Contributions are drawn from academics and professionals whose ideas and experiences come from a number of countries and contexts.

  • Impact factor
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  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
    0.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.00
  • Eigenfactor
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  • Article influence
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  • Website
    Educational Media International website
  • Other titles
    Educational media international (Online), EMI
  • ISSN
    0952-3987
  • OCLC
    44530184
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 12 month embargo for STM, Behavioural Science and Public Health Journals
    • 18 month embargo for SSH journals
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • Pre-print on authors own website, Institutional or Subject Repository
    • Post-print on authors own website, Institutional or Subject Repository
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • Publisher will deposit to PMC on behalf of NIH authors.
    • STM: Science, Technology and Medicine
    • SSH: Social Science and Humanities
    • 'Taylor & Francis (Psychology Press)' is an imprint of 'Taylor & Francis'
  • Classification
    ​ yellow

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: At the University of the Free State (UFS) in South Africa, professional development is characterised by its focus on the advancement of scholarly teaching in the disciplines. Practices followed are informed by the scholarship of teaching and learning movement. Within learning communities, special attention is given to the motivational conditions for optimal development, which are intentionally and collaboratively created or enhanced. An action research approach is adhered to, with action learning always an underlying ingredient. The approach has already shown promising signs in advancing personal growth and scholarly teaching practices among lecturers in the Decoding Learning in Law project. The decoding idea originated in the USA and follows a process of identifying and addressing the discipline-specific learning problems of undergraduate students. As precursor to the more formal phase of decoding, the Centre for Teaching and Learning at the UFS has embarked on a process of empowering a group of lecturers in law to address the challenges they experience in their teaching environment. During meetings and workshops, the members of the newly established learning community act as collaborators in the construction of new knowledge on the theory and practice of good teaching and learning (with a special focus on student engagement); they reflect critically on obstacles in their own courses and take part actively in conversations on the application of innovative strategies in law teaching. Special attention is given to the use of educational technology. In the project, development of relevant technological skills was preceded by a technology-needs survey and discussions in which prevailing perceptions about the use of technology in law education were brought to light. Although the project is still in its first year, the motivational context of community and collaboration has already given rise to a synergy that promises to reshape the teaching and learning environment in law at the UFS. In an informal way, progress has also been made with the decoding process of identifying “bottlenecks” in the teaching and learning of law at the institution.
    Educational Media International 01/2014; 51(2).
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    ABSTRACT: Augmented Reality is poised to profoundly transform Education as we know it. The capacity to overlay rich media onto the real world for viewing through web-enabled devices such as phones and tablet devices means that information can be made available to students at the exact time and place of need. This has the potential to reduce cognitive overload by providing students with “perfectly situated scaffolding”, as well as enable learning in a range of other ways. This paper will review uses of Augmented Reality both in mainstream society and in education, and discuss the pedagogical potentials afforded by the technology. Based on the prevalence of information delivery uses of Augmented Reality in Education, we argue the merit of having students design Augmented Reality experiences in order to develop their higher order thinking capabilities. A case study of “learning by design” using Augmented Reality in high school Visual Art is presented, with samples of student work and their feedback indicating that the approach resulted in high levels of independent thinking, creativity and critical analysis. The paper concludes by establishing a future outlook for Augmented Reality and setting a research agenda going forward.
    Educational Media International 01/2014; 51(1).
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    ABSTRACT: This article explores the impact of using commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) videogames in a high school curriculum when developed through a connected learning frame by examining the influence that COTS videogames have on transforming students’ literacy learning in-school. However, it must be noted that transforming literacy in school is about more than bridging in- and out-of-school literacies; it concerns developing a deeper understanding of the meaning of literacy in today’s multimediated world, and the ways that these experiences are connected not only to media, but to traditional texts, peers, and guiding teachers, so that we can better grasp how to harness new learning styles and new ways of making meaning in contemporary classroom spaces. To understand how to capture in and out-of-school practices, we conducted a qualitative case study of two high school students enrolled in a reading intervention class that incorporated a COTS videogames curriculum. Data were analyzed via a constant comparison analysis. Findings indicated that the games-based curriculum created through a connected learning frame enabled students to engage in a constellation of connections among digital media, traditional texts, peers, and guiding teachers.
    Educational Media International 01/2014; 51(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study proposes the use of case-based reasoning to help educators design with Web 2.0. Principles for designing a web-enhanced case-based activity (CBA) were used to design an online professional development course for a group of 16 in-service educators. The Learning in Context model was used as a scaffold to help participants in their design of activities. Formative evaluation points toward the utility of this approach, and rich description is provided to help readers assess the findings. Findings related to the use of CBA design principles include: the possibility of using open resources to build case libraries; the importance of using expert cases analogous to the needs of participants; the importance of direct and soft scaffolding; the need for feedback, reflection and design iteration; and the perceived usefulness of the Learning in Context model as a scaffold. An unexpected finding was how hands-on familiarity with the tools appeared to be a prerequisite for participants to engage in the expert case exploration, and to design with Web 2.0.
    Educational Media International 01/2014; 51(2).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study explores elementary teacher perceptions related to the implementation of an online tutoring program. Teachers were surveyed regarding factors that affected use of the online tutoring program as a supplement to mathematics instruction. Results indicated that teachers overwhelmingly reported positive views of the training and support opportunities provided, as well as confidence in their level of knowledge and the ease of use of the program. Teachers also indicated strong support of the mathematical content and instructional value of the program. Each of these factors increases the likelihood that online tutoring programs such as the one implemented in this study will continue to be used among teachers as a supplement to mathematics instruction.
    Educational Media International 01/2014; 51(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Researchers have offered, in recent years, compelling reasons for considering the potential of digital games to support learning and in response policy-makers and educators around the world have demonstrated a commitment to exploring their practical use in school. There remain, however, many questions about how games can best support learning, particularly in formal education. This paper examines the implications of formal game-based learning for teachers developing their own digital learning games, exploring two guiding overarching research questions. What strategies are employed by teachers to manage intergenerational, technological, operational and pedagogic tensions in the classroom? And to what extent is the notion of being a “designer” visible in their professional practice? The paper suggests that there are multiple ways of “being a designer” for teachers, and that the notion of “designer” may be a more problematic representation of teacher agency and identity than currently visible in the literature.
    Educational Media International 01/2014; 51(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Despite the potential benefits of assignment feedback, learners often fail to use it effectively. This study examines the ways in which adult distance learners engage with written feedback on one of their assignments. Participants were 10 undergraduates studying Spanish at the Open University, UK. Their responses to feedback were elicited by means of student-generated screencast (Jing®) recordings in which students talked through the feedback written by their tutors. The recordings were analysed in terms of the students’ cognitive, affective and metacognitive responses to the tutors’ feedback. Results show that, while students do engage with tutor feedback and make active efforts to integrate it, they sometimes use ineffective strategies, especially when tutor and student make different assumptions about the role of feedback. The richness of the data obtained from the Feedback on feedback (F on F) method suggests that it has the potential to promote much needed feedback dialogue between students and tutors.
    Educational Media International 01/2014; 51(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study focused on ways teachers and students in an urban high school used technologies often labeled as disruptive (i.e. social media and mobile phones) as learning and relationship building tools, inside and outside the classroom. In this teacher research study, secondary teachers discussed digital literacies, the digital divide, and digital teacher–student relationships with their urban high school students. Findings showed that students had difficulties connecting their personal media use (social media and mobile phones) with its usefulness as an educational tool. In response, teachers leveraged teacher–student relationships, the social–emotional bond developed through classroom communication that links the two groups, by connecting with students via social media and other technologies in order to extend learning beyond the classroom. Examples of how and why secondary teachers structured their digital interactions with students may provide a framework for other secondary educators wanting to create or expand their digital classrooms.
    Educational Media International 01/2014; 51(2).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The educational applications of wikis are becoming very popular among instructors and researchers and they have captured their attention and imagination. This paper reports on the investigation of a wiki project designed to support university students’ collaborative authoring and learning. The design framework of the wiki-based project is outlined and an analysis framework is proposed as the result of combining content analysis of students’ edits and posts in the wiki pages. The framework was applied to investigate students’ engagement, their contribution to the wiki content, and the patterns of collaboration and content co-creation they followed during the project timeline. Our findings revealed the various patterns of students’ contribution and learning presence in their wiki group, as well as four different student roles. The paper concludes with suggestions for future development of the framework and research in the field of wiki learning design.
    Educational Media International 12/2013; 50(4):306-324.
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    ABSTRACT: This study examined whether gaining access to a new digital device enhanced the digital media literacy of young adults and what factors determine such change. Thirty-five young adults were given a mobile tablet device and observed for one year. Participants engaged in an online community, responding regularly to online surveys and discussion forums. Digital media literacy, using multidimensional scales, was measured at the beginning and end of the study. Usage was measured every month to track changes over time. When measured with multiple dimensional scales, the participants’ digital media literacy levels increased over time. Those who used the tablet device for information access and social activities increased their digital media literacy in some dimensions. However, an increase in digital media literacy was not directly related to the time spent on the tablet.
    Educational Media International 01/2013; 5(4):266-280.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Schools have seen an exponential increase in the range of information communication technology (ICT) being utilised for learning and teaching over the past decade, especially with the advent of the internet. What is exciting is not just more technology, but that there are more types of technology which teachers can pick and choose from, based on their own pedagogical preferences. Set in the context of a private school in Singapore, the study suggests that a best-fit approach across pedagogy, technology and collegiality may be a compelling proposition to implementing ICT in schools. The study recommends the use of two new terms “Technogogy” and “Teachnology” along with Collegiality in the iTEaCH (ICT-Technogogy-and-Collegiality Holistic) Implementation Model, to better describe the ICT implementation process in schools.
    Educational Media International 01/2013; 50(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The study investigates how Taiwanese pre-service teachers make meaning after reading positive or negative news coverage of educational events and how they construct meaning impact their pedagogical beliefs. An experiment with a two-group pre-test–post-test design, consisting of a positive and negative news group, is conducted. Multimedia news stories of seven educational events were selected and evaluated as positive or negative materials. In total, 215 pre-service teachers were assigned randomly to one of the two groups. Analytical results reveal that pre-service teachers who read positive news preferred inference to construct meaning. Their pedagogical beliefs did not differ when they used interpretation or inference. For negative news, pre-service teachers preferred interpretation; however, belief scores using interpretation were lower than those using inference. Specifically, meanings constructed using interpretation when reading negative news about school administrative engagement severely weakens their pedagogical beliefs. Pre-service teachers should be given sufficient material and training to rationally deal with a wide range of news stories, especially negative educational news stories.
    Educational Media International 01/2013; 50(2).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study investigated the effect of expertise-based training (XBT) on the quality of digital stories created by early childhood education (ECE) pre-service teachers. The participants of the study were 69 pre-service teachers from the ECE Department. The study was experimental, utilizing a static-group pre-test/post-test design, supported with qualitative data. Data were collected through analysis and evaluation of digital stories, open-ended questionnaire, and journals. During analysis, an independent t-test was conducted and open coding analysis was applied. The results showed that the XBT group teachers earned significantly higher scores on their digital stories than the traditional group. Moreover, the XBT group focused more on the details of digital story creation, such as emphasizing the purpose of the story during each component; choosing an appropriate tone of voice; using pictures, including characters as Pepe, Kayo, and The Smurfs; and defining key words then applying pictures accordingly.
    Educational Media International 01/2013; 50(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper discusses how practicing teachers conceptualize commercial off the shelf (COTS) videogames within classroom-based English language arts instruction. Understanding how today’s teachers perceive virtual worlds and videogames as an instructional tool for schema building within literacy development will help researchers better understand ways to structure games-based learning in classroom environments. Data for this study were drawn from case study research of a graduate pilot course focusing on the intersections of virtual worlds, popular culture, and literacy instruction. Findings indicate that a limited understanding of videogames and virtual worlds does not hinder practicing teachers from desiring to create engaging units of study using videogames as a schema building tool. However, teachers feel that using videogames for schema building in the classroom will lead to negative perceptions of how they are viewed as teachers. This is compounded by the perception that they will not receive adequate financial support in the form of professional development from administration, nor will they receive monies for technological support to implement within instruction. However, despite these findings, teachers desire to use games-based learning and implement it as a schema building exercises with their students.
    Educational Media International 01/2013; 50(1).
  • Educational Media International 01/2013; 50(3).
  • Educational Media International 01/2013; 50(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Evolving technologies and globalisation presents educators with the challenge of creating learning experiences to help students develop competencies to enable them to function successfully in a dynamic society. Today’s learner is expected to be multiliterate – able to analyse and construct multi-modal texts. A qualitative embedded multi-case study was conducted to investigate the learning experiences and multiliteracy outcomes for students engaged in an educational program with a media studies focus. The program, designed for a secondary school English curriculum, was underpinned by multiliteracies pedagogy and delivered within a technology-mediated environment. This paper reports a single class case drawing upon examples from small group cases embedded within the class. The findings suggest that educational programs underpinned by multiliteracy pedagogy supported by technology can provide meaningful learning experiences for students whilst achieving multiliteracies focused learning outcomes. For this to occur important factors such as teacher technology competencies and expertise, access and integration of technology and facilitation of effective learning scaffolds should be considered.
    Educational Media International 01/2013; 50(2).
  • Educational Media International 01/2013; 50(3).

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