International Journal of the History of Sport (Int J Hist Sport )

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Description

The International Journal of the History of Sport is acknowledged as a leading journal in the field of the historical study of sport in its political, cultural, social, educational, economic, spiritual and aesthetic dimensions. The journal offers a forum to anthropologists, sociologists, historians and others who seek to explore the relationship between sport and society in a historical context.

Impact factor 0.26

  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
    5.40
  • Immediacy index
    0.17
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.00
  • Website
    International Journal of the History of Sport website
  • Other titles
    The International journal of the history of sport
  • ISSN
    0952-3367
  • OCLC
    16314947
  • Material type
    Periodical
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • On author's personal website or departmental website immediately
    • On institutional repository or subject-based repository after either 12 months embargo for STM, Behavioural Science and Public Health Journals or 18 months embargo for SSH journals
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • The publisher will deposit in on behalf of authors to a designated institutional repository including PubMed Central, where a deposit agreement exists with the repository
    • STM: Science, Technology and Medicine
    • SSH: Social Science and Humanities
    • Publisher last contacted on 25/03/2014
    • 'Taylor & Francis (Psychology Press)' is an imprint of 'Taylor & Francis'
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • International Journal of the History of Sport 01/2015; 32(2).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In response to recent articles by Eric Dunning and Graham Curry, this article presents a wide range of new material from the period 1841 to 1851 in the ‘Origins of Football Debate’, using evidence gleaned from the British Library's digitisation of nineteenth-century newspapers. It responds to the charge that the works of ‘revisionist historians’, John Goulstone, Adrian Harvey and Peter Swain, are misleading and have led to hasty conclusions, and rejects their analysis that argues they are part of an academic community seemingly frantic for working-class influence to the detriment of public schoolboys. The article adds extensive evidence that records a much broader footballing culture across the country in mid-century than previously thought. In so doing, it addresses concerns, which have troubled many scholars, of the alleged disappearance of football in the wider community in the mid-nineteenth century, not least because of the sport's rapid expansion amongst the working and middle classes in the 1870s. The evidence presented does suggest that many forms of football other than folk football or games under the influence of public schools or public schoolboys were played, challenging ‘orthodox’ historian's views surrounding the influence of public schools and public schoolboys on the development of the game.
    International Journal of the History of Sport 01/2015; 32(2).
  • International Journal of the History of Sport 01/2015; 32(2).
  • International Journal of the History of Sport 01/2015; 32(2).
  • Jan Luitzen, Pascal Delheye
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    ABSTRACT: Whereas earlier research has shown that (traditional) cricket was invented in Flanders (i.e. the Southern Low Countries), this article focuses on the introduction of modern cricket in the Netherlands (i.e. the Northern Low Countries). The result is a broad textual study, based on large-scale digital analysis. We show that the integration of this sport textually took place in three phases: first in small groups via billingual translation dictionaries (starting in 1724), translated literature and ego documents, then through educational leisure books and manuals, and finally by means of articles in periodicals and news papers (with information about cricket matches). With regard to the practice and propagation of cricket, pupils and former pupils of Noorthey, a Protestant-Christian boarding school for boys, played a very important role. Clubs were founded all over the Netherlands, and in 1883 the Dutch cricket federation was established. In the end, however, cricket did not become a popular national sport in the Netherlands.
    International Journal of the History of Sport 01/2015; 32(2).
  • International Journal of the History of Sport 01/2015; 32(2).
  • Donald Spivey
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    ABSTRACT: Satchel Paige's gala baseball performances in Canada had meaning at multiple levels when assessed within the context of US–Canadian relations, individual and national identity, race, the struggle for equality and the place of culture – sport and baseball in particular – in international relations and diplomacy. Paige was one of baseball's foremost globetrotters, and the premier African-American baseball ambassador without portfolio. His pitching talents and economic importance ignited passions across the borders, commencing in the 1920s and continuing over four decades. He rarely travelled less than 40,000 miles a year throughout the USA and to foreign shores wherever duty called, and there was the promise of a good payday. The great fireballer for hire and other star black ballplayers relished playing south of the border because of the freedom from Jim Crow. It is often overlooked that they loved playing north of the border as well, in Canada in particular. That play, as argued here, had symbolic and substantive international significance.
    International Journal of the History of Sport 01/2015; 32(2).
  • International Journal of the History of Sport 01/2015; 32(2).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: During the 1970s, a number of prominent British and Irish footballers – the likes of which included Gordon Banks, George Best, Bobby Charlton, Geoff Hurst and Bobby Moore – played as ‘guest players’ on a short-term basis for various clubs in South Africa's National Football League (NFL), a ‘whites-only’ professional league that spanned the period 1959–1977. Coupled with this, NFL clubs from the outset also secured the services of additional foreign players of lesser standing on longer term contracts in an attempt to improve the standard of play. The strategy of importing high-profile ‘guests’ during the 1970s ultimately proved unsuccessful in sustaining the league as it disbanded after the 1977 season. Utilising archival documentation, contemporary media reports and existing football works, this essay aims to establish the reasons behind the NFL's demise. Two particular factors under consideration are the erosion of the league's entertainment value and the deteriorating economic conditions within South Africa at the time. These elements are juxtaposed with additional factors such as the rise in popularity of multiracial football, the resulting drain of sponsorship away from the white professional game, as well as political machinations within South Africa during this period.
    International Journal of the History of Sport 01/2015; 32(2).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The 1984 Olympics in Los Angeles witnessed a transformation in the economic, political and cultural dynamics of the modern Olympic movement. By the 1980s many observers worried that the Olympics tottered on the verge of extinction. Plagued by boycotts, terrorism and intractable national rivalries and beset by financial shortfalls, cost overruns and the expenditure of vast sums for ‘white elephant’ facilities, the list of potential suitors for hosting the games dwindled until only Los Angeles remained. The world had seemingly abandoned the Olympics as too costly and too controversial. Indeed, some forecasters predicted that Los Angeles would signal the death-knell of the modern games. Instead, the organisers of the Los Angeles Olympics transformed the economic, political and cultural dynamics of the games. Fuelled by television broadcasting funds and the billions of viewers that the medium brought to the spectacle, the Olympics in 1984 became a fundamental element in the emergence in the second half of the twentieth century of ‘global television’ – a vast new consumer culture that incorporated the world's nations into an amalgamated audience that shared experiences through their viewing habits. ‘Global television’ transformed the modern Olympic movement – a process that came into clear view in 1984 in Los Angeles.
    International Journal of the History of Sport 01/2015; 32(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Due to the decision of the Soviet Union and nearly all of its East European satellites to withdraw from the 1984 Los Angeles Summer Games, the communist media provided audiences in the Soviet bloc with few reports on the sporting events in the Olympic city. When Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty, broadcasters funded by the US government, attempted to fill this ‘information gap’ by beaming coverage of the Los Angeles Games behind the Iron Curtain, the Soviet Union protested to the International Olympic Committee. They claimed, with a mixture of fact and fiction, that the Radios were tools of the American intelligence establishment and accused them of broadcasting ‘subversive’ propaganda to Eastern Europe and the USSR. Stirred into action by this Soviet manoeuvre, leading spokesmen for the Radios were joined by government officials, private citizens, US Olympic Committee members and the American media in a concerted attempt not only to defend the work of the broadcasters, but also to secure their press accreditation for Los Angeles.
    International Journal of the History of Sport 01/2015; 32(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The election of Raúl Alfonsín in October of 1983 represented the return of democracy to Argentina after more than seven years of a military dictatorship that left the country in a terribly distressed state. Since the dictatorship had joined the boycott of the 1980 Moscow Olympics led by the USA, for Argentina, the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics meant both coming back to the Olympic fold and the first such festival under the new democratic government. This paper explores Argentina's trajectory towards, and construction of, its participation in the country's first post-dictatorship Olympics. In doing so, this paper reveals why participation in the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics was not a priority for the incoming administration and why such participation was not conceived as a potential emissary capable of reaffirming on the global Olympic stage the hard fought, yet still emerging, democracy of Argentina. In addition, it reveals not only the determination of the Alfonsín administration to make his sport policy work but also its aspirations, complexity and ambiguities.
    International Journal of the History of Sport 01/2015; 32(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The 1984 Los Angeles Games hosted, for the first time in Olympic history, a women's marathon race. It took the efforts of several important factions to accomplish the event. First, women runners demonstrated that they were capable of running great distances in increasingly faster times. Second, the popular media publicised those performances, often mitigating athletic commentary with observations about the runners' femininity, attractiveness and relationships with men. Finally, commercial sponsors joined the ranks in this marathon battle to finance important events, running circuits and advocacy groups while simultaneously promoting their own brands of commodity feminism. In the end, it took the coming together of the physical activists, media advocates and corporate champions to accomplish this milestone in sport history.
    International Journal of the History of Sport 01/2015; 32(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Behind the shadows of an Olympiad replete with tales of Cold War acrimony and lavish commercial excess, emerges South Africa's bureaucratic attempt to achieve readmission to the Olympic Movement prior to the 1984 Los Angeles Games. In the backdrop of the Reagan administration's conciliatory policy of ‘constructive engagement’ towards Pretoria, the all-white South African National Olympic Committee aspired to cease its two-decade-long sporting isolation in the southern California metropolis. Drawing upon archival materials from the International Olympic Studies Center and public debates in the leading national and sporting newspapers and periodicals of the time, this paper will detail and analyse how International Olympic Committee president Juan Antonio Samaranch was forced to navigate a tight political tightrope over the South African issue. Any concession towards Pretoria would have likely agitated the African-bloc nations – a powerful constituency on the IOC with a proclivity for boycotting Olympic Games – as well as the global-nexus of anti-apartheid groups that vehemently opposed South Africa's participation in Los Angeles.
    International Journal of the History of Sport 01/2015; 32(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: At the 1984 Los Angeles Olympic Games, the US cycling team not only won its first Olympic cycling medal since 1912 but also added eight more, marking a triumph for the team and its Polish-born coach, Eddie Borysewicz. Soon, however, news leaked that the seven members of the US cycling team, four of whom won medals, had employed controversial blood transfusions. Though not prohibited by the International Olympic Committee (IOC), the news caused a firestorm within the press and led to a significant revision of the IOC Medical Commission's anti-doping rules. Previous historical scholarship has ignored this event, focusing instead on early doping scandals such as Knud Jensen or more recent controversies such as Ben Johnson and Lance Armstrong. However, this event caused a significant shift within the IOC Medical Commission's attitude towards doping. Prior to 1984, the IOC Medical Commission had hesitated to prohibit any substance, including anabolic steroids, if it could not detect the substance through testing. The willingness of the US team to experiment with new medical procedures to improve performance galvanised the Medical Commission and set in motion new anti-doping policies that remain in place today.
    International Journal of the History of Sport 01/2015; 32(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Interest in staging the Olympic Games waned in cities across the world in the 1970s, given the intrusion of world geo-politics on recent festivals and the exploding costs of staging them. In running the show in Los Angeles, Peter Ueberroth prioritised pre-existing facilities, a new and more profitable means of affiliating corporate sponsors with an organising committee, and maximising revenue from television rights negotiations. His success encouraged cities to re-enter the bidding for Olympic festivals, and when combined with initiatives launched by the International Olympic Committee's (IOC) President, Juan Antonio Samaranch, brighter days for the IOC lay ahead in the 1980s and 1990s. Yet, Ueberroth's legacy was not well managed ultimately by Samaranch, who permitted the enhanced competition among bid cities, and the behaviour of bid officials and some of his own members to endanger the IOC's reputation and autonomy, highlighted notably by the Salt Lake City scandal. Last, in light of the cost of the Olympic festivals in Beijing and Sochi, and its dampening effect on the current host city bidding environment, it seems wise for the IOC and future bid cities to re-visit the Ueberroth model for lessons in cost containment, and like Ueberroth, exhibit a willingness to explore novel, more cost-effective means for cities to host the Olympic Games.
    International Journal of the History of Sport 01/2015; 32(1).
  • International Journal of the History of Sport 12/2014;
  • International Journal of the History of Sport 12/2014;
  • International Journal of the History of Sport 12/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article examines the connection between sport and the First World War. It challenges the conventional wisdom that the athleticism associated with a public school education made a significant contribution to the British war effort. Additionally it argues that athleticism had a negligible influence on elementary school pupils who comprised the bulk of the military forces. It also suggests that while army authorities eventually accepted that sport had a positive role to play and made it a compulsory element of military training, it also existed as an escape from hostilities rather than just preparation for them.
    International Journal of the History of Sport 12/2014; 31(18).