International Journal of the History of Sport (Int J Hist Sport )

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Journal description

The International Journal of the History of Sport is acknowledged as a leading journal in the field of the historical study of sport in its political, cultural, social, educational, economic, spiritual and aesthetic dimensions. The journal offers a forum to anthropologists, sociologists, historians and others who seek to explore the relationship between sport and society in a historical context.

Current impact factor: 0.26

Impact Factor Rankings

Additional details

5-year impact 0.00
Cited half-life 5.40
Immediacy index 0.17
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.00
Website International Journal of the History of Sport website
Other titles The International journal of the history of sport
ISSN 0952-3367
OCLC 16314947
Material type Periodical
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • On author's personal website or departmental website immediately
    • On institutional repository or subject-based repository after either 12 months embargo for STM, Behavioural Science and Public Health Journals or 18 months embargo for SSH journals
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • The publisher will deposit in on behalf of authors to a designated institutional repository including PubMed Central, where a deposit agreement exists with the repository
    • STM: Science, Technology and Medicine
    • SSH: Social Science and Humanities
    • Publisher last contacted on 25/03/2014
    • 'Taylor & Francis (Psychology Press)' is an imprint of 'Taylor & Francis'
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The 1984 Olympics in Los Angeles witnessed a transformation in the economic, political and cultural dynamics of the modern Olympic movement. By the 1980s many observers worried that the Olympics tottered on the verge of extinction. Plagued by boycotts, terrorism and intractable national rivalries and beset by financial shortfalls, cost overruns and the expenditure of vast sums for ‘white elephant’ facilities, the list of potential suitors for hosting the games dwindled until only Los Angeles remained. The world had seemingly abandoned the Olympics as too costly and too controversial. Indeed, some forecasters predicted that Los Angeles would signal the death-knell of the modern games. Instead, the organisers of the Los Angeles Olympics transformed the economic, political and cultural dynamics of the games. Fuelled by television broadcasting funds and the billions of viewers that the medium brought to the spectacle, the Olympics in 1984 became a fundamental element in the emergence in the second half of the twentieth century of ‘global television’ – a vast new consumer culture that incorporated the world's nations into an amalgamated audience that shared experiences through their viewing habits. ‘Global television’ transformed the modern Olympic movement – a process that came into clear view in 1984 in Los Angeles.
    International Journal of the History of Sport 09/2015; 32(1).
  • International Journal of the History of Sport 09/2015; 32(1):1-8.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The year 1948, as a starting point both of this study and of the organised military sport for Greece, was particularly hectic, since the newly liberated country was embroiled in the Civil War while, simultaneously, it was trying to reconstitute itself. The next two decades were marked by the foundation and the activities of the Higher Coordinating Committee for Sport in the Armed Forces (Anotera Syntonistiki Epitropi Athlitismou Enoplon Dynameon - A.S.E.A.E.D.). This Committee organised and materialised the first steps of the newly established organised sports activities of the Hellenic Armed Forces and evolved as a result, into the Supreme Council for Sport in the Armed Forces (Anotato Symvoulio Athlitismou Enoplon Dynameon) in year 1968. Due to the lack of specific and thorough research on the topic during this era, the purpose of this study was to identify references and the original sources (archives both of the A.S.E.A.E.D. and of the Hellenic National Defense General Staff) and to highlight and reveal the activities of organised Greek military sport, in the organisational field, and the Hellenic Armed Forces' participation in international sports tournaments.
    International Journal of the History of Sport 07/2015; 32(2):351-366.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: During the Japanese occupation of British Malaya and Southeast Asia from the years 1942 to 1945 there were reports of POWs being allowed to play cricket, football, rugby and basketball, as told by Kevin Blackburn in The Sportsmen of Changi published in 2012. This research about the sporting lives of a Governor and male European internees at Singapore's Changi prison is likely to be first detailed research on this topic. The authors depended mainly on four published diaries and 262 issues of the men's camp newspaper, Changi Guardian, to account for the male internees' casual and competitive cricket, football, hockey, volleyball, badminton, tennis and boxing matches that were played during internment. The Japanese Military Administration allowed the male internees to organize their daily lives and play games that they indulged in during the pre-War period as the British dominated the Singapore Cricket Club, Penang Cricket Club and Perak Club. The internees were able to play the various games and matches in spite of the limited food and sparse facilities. Many of the cricket and football games that were played were organized as inter-state, inter-club or league matches. These games were played with improvized equipment and rules.
    International Journal of the History of Sport 02/2015; 32(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Olympism has the potential to establish a common ground for tolerance of, and respect for, diversified ideologies. This is indispensable for humanity in the modern world. The 2008 Torch Relay and its representation in the press offers a unique window through which to examine the discursive construction of Olympism by and through the media within the historical and sociopolitical contexts associated with the Games. This paper firstly focuses on the historical development of the Olympic ideology (Olympism) along with the respective mainstream ideologies in China (harmony) and Britain (liberalism). It then attempts to explore the discursive construction of Olympism in the 2008 Torch Relay news coverage by the British and the Chinese media through applying the elaborated analytical approach – corpus-based CDA. This study demonstrates that there are contrasting expressions of Olympism in the media discourse. At a deeper level, this social practice is revealed to be dominated by the mainstream ideologies of the hosting and participating nations that have been entrenched throughout history. The involvement of China in Olympic history and the relevant sociopolitical events surrounding the 2008 Torch Relay are explored. The conclusion reinforces its significant contribution to the study of Olympism in the new era.
    International Journal of the History of Sport 02/2015; 32(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study tries to understand South Korean sport through the lens of media globalization. It explains what happened when Chan Ho Park gained fame in the Major League Baseball and how the Korean media sport market has changed since then. Due to the oligopolistic media market structure in Korea, and opportunistic behaviour, the sports media industry in Korea was not ready for media globalization and, consequently, the industry has seen indications of its marginalization in the global media market.
    International Journal of the History of Sport 02/2015; 32(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper intends to decode the colonial stereotyping of the Bengali which vacillated between valorization of Western education and the espousal of a martial raciology. The main argument here is that the cult of manliness in the physical culture movement was the answer to racism established by the white ruling class. Public schools acted as a model for disciplining the native body which was a boomerang for the colonizers. Physical culture was encouraged to make Bengali men healthy and instil the necessary moral virtues. Middle-class Bengalis made several efforts to revive the culture of akharas (or gymnasium) to cultivate and instil a sense of pride in the physical prowess of the Bengalis. This article further tries to explore such issues in the context of Colonial Bengal with particular reference to the emergence of physical exercise as an aspect of mass culture. Thus, the ‘Bengali Body’ was masculinized in the truest sense of the term.
    International Journal of the History of Sport 02/2015; 32(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The significance of sport, especially mega sport events, has been widely acknowledged as contributing to the development of nationalism and national identity.1 The use of the National Games by the nationalist government to promote Chinese nationalism and manage national identity in the Republic of China from 1910 to 1948 is examined in this paper. It begins with an interpretation of how Western sport was introduced to China, how China achieved its sovereignty of sport and how sport aided national salvation and nation-building. It examines the birth and the development of Chinese National Games, and the interplays of National Games and nationalism in the context of political and economic perspectives. It concludes that the promotion of National Games met the demands of China's national salvation and the principles of Chinese nationalism such as sovereignty, territorial integrity and patriotic sentiments. The National Games in the Republican China era played a role that was more than that of a sport event but one of shaping Chinese independent nationhood and national identity.
    International Journal of the History of Sport 02/2015; 32(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The Far Eastern Championship Games (FECG), held between 1913 and 1934, were a precursor to the Asian Games and among the first international athletic competitions in the Asian region. The FECG were launched in Manila, the Philippines, and supported by the Young Mens' Christian Association. Three countries participated in the Games: the Philippines, Japan and China. It is noteworthy that Korea, one of most powerful sports entities in Asia now, also participated in the FECG, but as part of the Japanese team. Although Korea was a powerless Japanese colony during the era, this paper argues that Korea's participation in the FECG permitted the colonized country to express its nationalism and become the cornerstone of modern sports development in Korea.
    International Journal of the History of Sport 02/2015; 32(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The presence of women in and around rugby union in New Zealand remains on the margins of the histories of the game of rugby and the more social and cultural histories that explore rugby's impact on the formation of a New Zealand national identity. Yet, as this article demonstrates, women have long since engaged with rugby union in ways that may well have assisted in its ascendancy and ultimate claiming of the title of New Zealand's national game. Through readings of newspapers, magazines, and club histories covering the period from the 1870s through to the Great War a picture emerges: women from both the middle and lower classes of New Zealand society supported the game of rugby as spectators, supporters, and fans. They did so in a manner that was sometimes acceptable but at other times regarded as distinctly inappropriate. In addition, women's involvement was informal and localized - most obvious at the community level - and it is this feature that helps to explain women's virtual invisibility in the histories of rugby union in New Zealand.
    International Journal of the History of Sport 02/2015;
  • International Journal of the History of Sport 02/2015;
  • International Journal of the History of Sport 01/2015; 32(2).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In response to recent articles by Eric Dunning and Graham Curry, this article presents a wide range of new material from the period 1841 to 1851 in the ‘Origins of Football Debate’, using evidence gleaned from the British Library's digitisation of nineteenth-century newspapers. It responds to the charge that the works of ‘revisionist historians’, John Goulstone, Adrian Harvey and Peter Swain, are misleading and have led to hasty conclusions, and rejects their analysis that argues they are part of an academic community seemingly frantic for working-class influence to the detriment of public schoolboys. The article adds extensive evidence that records a much broader footballing culture across the country in mid-century than previously thought. In so doing, it addresses concerns, which have troubled many scholars, of the alleged disappearance of football in the wider community in the mid-nineteenth century, not least because of the sport's rapid expansion amongst the working and middle classes in the 1870s. The evidence presented does suggest that many forms of football other than folk football or games under the influence of public schools or public schoolboys were played, challenging ‘orthodox’ historian's views surrounding the influence of public schools and public schoolboys on the development of the game.
    International Journal of the History of Sport 01/2015; 32(2).
  • International Journal of the History of Sport 01/2015; 32(2).
  • International Journal of the History of Sport 01/2015; 32(2).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Whereas earlier research has shown that (traditional) cricket was invented in Flanders (i.e. the Southern Low Countries), this article focuses on the introduction of modern cricket in the Netherlands (i.e. the Northern Low Countries). The result is a broad textual study, based on large-scale digital analysis. We show that the integration of this sport textually took place in three phases: first in small groups via billingual translation dictionaries (starting in 1724), translated literature and ego documents, then through educational leisure books and manuals, and finally by means of articles in periodicals and news papers (with information about cricket matches). With regard to the practice and propagation of cricket, pupils and former pupils of Noorthey, a Protestant-Christian boarding school for boys, played a very important role. Clubs were founded all over the Netherlands, and in 1883 the Dutch cricket federation was established. In the end, however, cricket did not become a popular national sport in the Netherlands.
    International Journal of the History of Sport 01/2015; 32(2).
  • International Journal of the History of Sport 01/2015; 32(2).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Satchel Paige's gala baseball performances in Canada had meaning at multiple levels when assessed within the context of US–Canadian relations, individual and national identity, race, the struggle for equality and the place of culture – sport and baseball in particular – in international relations and diplomacy. Paige was one of baseball's foremost globetrotters, and the premier African-American baseball ambassador without portfolio. His pitching talents and economic importance ignited passions across the borders, commencing in the 1920s and continuing over four decades. He rarely travelled less than 40,000 miles a year throughout the USA and to foreign shores wherever duty called, and there was the promise of a good payday. The great fireballer for hire and other star black ballplayers relished playing south of the border because of the freedom from Jim Crow. It is often overlooked that they loved playing north of the border as well, in Canada in particular. That play, as argued here, had symbolic and substantive international significance.
    International Journal of the History of Sport 01/2015; 32(2).
  • International Journal of the History of Sport 01/2015; 32(2).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: During the 1970s, a number of prominent British and Irish footballers – the likes of which included Gordon Banks, George Best, Bobby Charlton, Geoff Hurst and Bobby Moore – played as ‘guest players’ on a short-term basis for various clubs in South Africa's National Football League (NFL), a ‘whites-only’ professional league that spanned the period 1959–1977. Coupled with this, NFL clubs from the outset also secured the services of additional foreign players of lesser standing on longer term contracts in an attempt to improve the standard of play. The strategy of importing high-profile ‘guests’ during the 1970s ultimately proved unsuccessful in sustaining the league as it disbanded after the 1977 season. Utilising archival documentation, contemporary media reports and existing football works, this essay aims to establish the reasons behind the NFL's demise. Two particular factors under consideration are the erosion of the league's entertainment value and the deteriorating economic conditions within South Africa at the time. These elements are juxtaposed with additional factors such as the rise in popularity of multiracial football, the resulting drain of sponsorship away from the white professional game, as well as political machinations within South Africa during this period.
    International Journal of the History of Sport 01/2015; 32(2).