Clinical laboratory science: journal of the American Society for Medical Technology (Clin Lab Sci)

Publisher: American Society for Medical Technology; American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science, American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science

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Website Clinical Laboratory Science website
Other titles Clinical laboratory science
ISSN 0894-959X
OCLC 16360620
Material type Periodical
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science

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Publications in this journal

  • Clinical laboratory science: journal of the American Society for Medical Technology 01/2014; 27(2):105-6.
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    ABSTRACT: Next generation sequencing platforms and the applications that are offered have revolutionized the way a physician will treat and monitor a patient based on the individual's own genetic make-up. Whether whole genome sequencing, exome sequencing, or targeted sequencing is performed, the information generated must be analyzed, interpreted, and reported correctly. Since the various platforms and application panels are not FDA cleared (with the exception of the Illumina MiSeqDx Cystic Fibrosis Clinical Sequencing Assay and the Illumina MiSeqDx Cystic Fibrosis 139-Variant Assay) clinical laboratorians are faced with the challenge of standardizing and validating the various panels and platforms for appropriate quality management. Therefore, the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics published guidelines for ordering, test development, validation and reporting of genetic information. These guidelines should be followed by all laboratorians performing NGS to ensure quality results and to provide proper interpretation of all genomic variants identified.
    Clinical laboratory science: journal of the American Society for Medical Technology 01/2014; 27(3):179-84.
  • Clinical laboratory science: journal of the American Society for Medical Technology 01/2014; 27(1):6-12.
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    ABSTRACT: This is a case study of a 23-year-old pregnant Polynesian woman with anti-Jk3 identified in her plasma during her third visit to a hospital. This patient, with a history of mild anemia due to beta-thalassemia minor and two known transfusion of packed red cells came to an emergency room complaining of severe abdominal cramps. Her hemoglobin during her second hospital visit was 7.5 g/dL and her antibody screen was negative. Two units of crossmatch compatible packed cells were transfused with no adverse reaction and she was discharged. Four days post transfusion, she returned to the hospital complaining of back pain and fatigue and she was running a fever (101 degrees F). Her antibody screen was positive, direct antiglobulin testing was also positive and the eluate showed pan-agglutination with a red cell panel. Anti-Jk3 was identified in her plasma by the Red Cross and a delayed transfusion reaction was suspected. As a result, Kidd null crossmatch compatible units were obtained from relatives. The patient was successfully transfused and was discharged with a hemoglobin of 10.1 g/dL. The fetus appeared to be unaffected by the antibody. This case reiterates the hard-to-identify characteristics of Kidd antibodies and highlights the need for medical laboratory personnel to be informed on the prevalence of the Kidd null phenotype among various populations. Educating ethnic populations with rare phenotypes and organizing targeted blood drives may increase inventories of these rare blood phenotypes.
    Clinical laboratory science: journal of the American Society for Medical Technology 01/2014; 27(2):78-82.
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    ABSTRACT: A survey of members of the American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science (ASCLS) in 2012 examined laboratory administrators' views on retention incentives and older Clinical Laboratory Professionals (CLP). Results indicated that retention strategies currently in place are not concordant with the ones CLP think are important. Further, with the exception of ergonomic equipment, administrators reported low feasibility for the workplace changes favored by practitioners. While all administrators attributed positive traits to older CLP, older administrators held more favorable views. Administrators perceived older CLP as productive, having a high level of technical skills and loyal. The combination of technical competence and work ethic make retention of older CLP attractive to laboratory administrators and advantageous for combatting workforce shortages. This study highlights the discordance between the retention incentives valued by CLP and those viewed as feasible by administrators. Findings should be used by administrators to refine incentive packages that better reflect the desires of CLP.
    Clinical laboratory science: journal of the American Society for Medical Technology 01/2014; 27(3):162-8.
  • Article: Platforms.
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    ABSTRACT: The advent of DNA sequencing technologies and the various applications that can be performed will have a dramatic effect on medicine and healthcare in the near future. There are several DNA sequencing platforms available on the market for research and clinical use. Based on the medical laboratory scientist or researcher's needs and taking into consideration laboratory space and budget, one can chose which platform will be beneficial to their institution and their patient population. Although some of the instrument costs seem high, diagnosing a patient quickly and accurately will save hospitals money with fewer hospital stays and targeted treatment based on an individual's genetic make-up. By determining the type of disease an individual has, based on the mutations present or having the ability to prescribe the appropriate antimicrobials based on the knowledge of the organism's resistance patterns, the clinician will be better able to treat and diagnose a patient which ultimately will improve patient outcomes and prognosis.
    Clinical laboratory science: journal of the American Society for Medical Technology 01/2014; 27(3):173-8.
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    ABSTRACT: This study investigated medical laboratory science clinical instructors' beliefs about teaching and how they viewed themselves as teachers. The first phase of the study included an integrative literature review, which suggested that the development of teacher identity in school-based educators, and to a lesser extent higher education faculty, is dependent on four dimensions: personal factors, training factors, contextual factors, and reflective practice. The second phase of this study began qualitative inquiry into the ways that these participants described their teaching and professional identity. Interviews were conducted with medical laboratory science clinical instructors in order to gain an understanding of their perceptions of themselves as teachers. The data collected in this study indicate that this group of clinical instructors saw themselves as teachers who were responsible for providing students with technical skills needed to become competent practitioners and the theoretical foundation necessary to pass the national certification exam. The study participants also saw themselves as mentors who were responsible for passing along professional knowledge to the next generation of laboratory practitioners. During data analysis three themes emerged that represent aspects of teacher identity in clinical instructors: belief in one's teaching ability, desire to expand one's professional responsibilities, and reflection on one's teaching. The findings from this study may provide a foundation for future research designed to measure teacher identity in clinical instructors.
    Clinical laboratory science: journal of the American Society for Medical Technology 01/2014; 27(2):97-104.
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    ABSTRACT: Hemoglobin Alc (HbAlc) is the standard measurement of glycemic control, and the HbAlc value can be used to estimate average glucose using a formula. Several studies suggest that the relationship between average glucose and HbAlc may be different for Blacks. This project enrolled non-Hispanic black and white individuals with type 2 diabetes and evaluated the relationship between HbAlc and blood glucose.
    Clinical laboratory science: journal of the American Society for Medical Technology 01/2014; 27(2):89-96.
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    ABSTRACT: Mycoplasma genitalium has been the focus of basic scientific and synthetic biology research as the organism with the smallest genome of all known human bacterial pathogens. As a sexually transmitted organism, substantial clinical and epidemiologic evidence now exists that warrant further consideration of M. genitalium as a priority for diagnostic testing.This article aims to concisely address the rationale for continued investigation of M. genitalium as a sexually transmitted infection (STI) and for the implementation of diagnostic testing paradigms in the USA.
    Clinical laboratory science: journal of the American Society for Medical Technology 01/2014; 27(1):47-52.
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    ABSTRACT: A survey of members of the American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science (ASCLS) was taken in May, 2012 to study workplace incentives and personal factors that could encourage clinical laboratory professionals (CLP) to continue working past retirement eligibility. Benefits, compensation, and opportunity for part-time work were key retention incentives identified by CLP in all age and job function groups. Career stage was shown to play a significant role in how CLP rated the importance of several retirement incentives, suggesting that age differences exist in workplace factors and personal motivators for continuing to work. There are also differences among practitioners, administrators, and educators in how they view incentives for working past retirement eligibility. Results of the study may help laboratory administrators advocate for workplace changes important to retaining staff of varying age and job function.
    Clinical laboratory science: journal of the American Society for Medical Technology 01/2014; 27(3):150-61.
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    ABSTRACT: The intent of the Affordable Care Act is to ensure that all Americans have access to quality, affordable healthcare while significantly reducing the cost burden for this country. It is estimated that an additional 32 million individuals will be covered. The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) estimates this legislation will reduce the deficit by $143 billion in the first 10 years (2011-2020) with an additional $1.2 trillion in savings during the subsequent decade. comprehend and change. That is why it has taken so long to pass any legislation related to this issue. We are almost 50 years post-introduction of Medicare and Medicaid and while there has been much dialogue and a number of infamous attempts to tackle the issue, the ACA is the first successful attempt to pass legislation. History will tell if Congress and the President "got it right" but the alternative of doing nothing was also unacceptable. One might predict that some of what has been legislated and already implemented will stand and result in positive change (i.e. the focus on preventive health and wellness) while other aspects will require change - some minor and some major. We are already seeing changes and timelines that are being modified and delayed. This is a topic that will require an ongoing assessment and look-back to see what was done correctly and what needs to be changed.
    Clinical laboratory science: journal of the American Society for Medical Technology 01/2014; 27(2):107-11.
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    ABSTRACT: A survey to assess the retirement plans of clinical laboratory professionals (CLP) and the factors that would influence those plans was distributed to members of the American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science (ASCLS) in May, 2012. A majority of respondents (65%) between 50-62 years indicated that there was a greater than 50% chance they would be working after age 62. Only 15.8% of the respondents thought that there was a greater than 50% chance that they would be working full time after they retired from their current job. The retirement option selected most often by respondents was part time work. This was true for respondents in all age groups and job functions. The greatest personal influence on retirement plans was concern about health issues. The results indicate that, if employers can provide part time options, older workers may stay in the workforce as long as they are healthy.
    Clinical laboratory science: journal of the American Society for Medical Technology 01/2014; 27(3):143-9.
  • Clinical laboratory science: journal of the American Society for Medical Technology 01/2014; 27(2):66.
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    ABSTRACT: An entire series could be dedicated to the topic of ethics in personalized medicine. Due to the advancements in NGS and genetic testing, personalized medicine is no longer something that will occur in the future, the reality is upon us now. Sequencing an individual's genome can have a substantial impact on the patient's treatment and overall quality of life. However, this can open "Pandora's box" especially if an individual does not want to know the information obtained. In addition, will insurance companies require genetic testing in order to pay for a targeted treatment? If the patient refuses to have the genetic testing, will they have to pay for their treatment out of pocket? In the human interest story presented, the researcher and his team discovered over activity of the FTL3 protein through RNA sequencing which resulted in rapid proliferation of his leukemic cells. He identified a drug marketed for advanced kidney cancer which was a FTL3 inhibitor. However, his insurance company refused to pay for the drug because it was not a known treatment for his condition of ALL. He incurred numerous out of pocket expenses in order to go into remission. Was it unethical for the insurance company to not pay for a treatment that ultimately worked but was not marketed or FDA cleared for his type of leukemia? There are so many questions and concerns when personalized medicine is implemented. Only time will tell the effects next generation sequencing and its role in personalized medicine will have in the future.
    Clinical laboratory science: journal of the American Society for Medical Technology 01/2014; 27(3):185-90.