Clinical laboratory science: journal of the American Society for Medical Technology Impact Factor & Information

Publisher: American Society for Medical Technology; American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science, American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science

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5-year impact 0.00
Cited half-life 0.00
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Website Clinical Laboratory Science website
Other titles Clinical laboratory science
ISSN 0894-959X
OCLC 16360620
Material type Periodical
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science

  • Pre-print
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    ‚Äč white

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Next generation sequencing platforms and the applications that are offered have revolutionized the way a physician will treat and monitor a patient based on the individual's own genetic make-up. Whether whole genome sequencing, exome sequencing, or targeted sequencing is performed, the information generated must be analyzed, interpreted, and reported correctly. Since the various platforms and application panels are not FDA cleared (with the exception of the Illumina MiSeqDx Cystic Fibrosis Clinical Sequencing Assay and the Illumina MiSeqDx Cystic Fibrosis 139-Variant Assay) clinical laboratorians are faced with the challenge of standardizing and validating the various panels and platforms for appropriate quality management. Therefore, the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics published guidelines for ordering, test development, validation and reporting of genetic information. These guidelines should be followed by all laboratorians performing NGS to ensure quality results and to provide proper interpretation of all genomic variants identified.
    Clinical laboratory science: journal of the American Society for Medical Technology 01/2014; 27(3):179-84.
  • Clinical laboratory science: journal of the American Society for Medical Technology 01/2014; 27(2):105-6.
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    ABSTRACT: Mycoplasma genitalium has been the focus of basic scientific and synthetic biology research as the organism with the smallest genome of all known human bacterial pathogens. As a sexually transmitted organism, substantial clinical and epidemiologic evidence now exists that warrant further consideration of M. genitalium as a priority for diagnostic testing.This article aims to concisely address the rationale for continued investigation of M. genitalium as a sexually transmitted infection (STI) and for the implementation of diagnostic testing paradigms in the USA.
    Clinical laboratory science: journal of the American Society for Medical Technology 01/2014; 27(1):47-52.
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    ABSTRACT: This study investigated medical laboratory science clinical instructors' beliefs about teaching and how they viewed themselves as teachers. The first phase of the study included an integrative literature review, which suggested that the development of teacher identity in school-based educators, and to a lesser extent higher education faculty, is dependent on four dimensions: personal factors, training factors, contextual factors, and reflective practice. The second phase of this study began qualitative inquiry into the ways that these participants described their teaching and professional identity. Interviews were conducted with medical laboratory science clinical instructors in order to gain an understanding of their perceptions of themselves as teachers. The data collected in this study indicate that this group of clinical instructors saw themselves as teachers who were responsible for providing students with technical skills needed to become competent practitioners and the theoretical foundation necessary to pass the national certification exam. The study participants also saw themselves as mentors who were responsible for passing along professional knowledge to the next generation of laboratory practitioners. During data analysis three themes emerged that represent aspects of teacher identity in clinical instructors: belief in one's teaching ability, desire to expand one's professional responsibilities, and reflection on one's teaching. The findings from this study may provide a foundation for future research designed to measure teacher identity in clinical instructors.
    Clinical laboratory science: journal of the American Society for Medical Technology 01/2014; 27(2):97-104.
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    ABSTRACT: A survey of members of the American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science (ASCLS) was taken in May, 2012 to study workplace incentives and personal factors that could encourage clinical laboratory professionals (CLP) to continue working past retirement eligibility. Benefits, compensation, and opportunity for part-time work were key retention incentives identified by CLP in all age and job function groups. Career stage was shown to play a significant role in how CLP rated the importance of several retirement incentives, suggesting that age differences exist in workplace factors and personal motivators for continuing to work. There are also differences among practitioners, administrators, and educators in how they view incentives for working past retirement eligibility. Results of the study may help laboratory administrators advocate for workplace changes important to retaining staff of varying age and job function.
    Clinical laboratory science: journal of the American Society for Medical Technology 01/2014; 27(3):150-61.
  • Clinical laboratory science: journal of the American Society for Medical Technology 01/2014; 27(1):6-12.
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    ABSTRACT: Hemoglobin Alc (HbAlc) is the standard measurement of glycemic control, and the HbAlc value can be used to estimate average glucose using a formula. Several studies suggest that the relationship between average glucose and HbAlc may be different for Blacks. This project enrolled non-Hispanic black and white individuals with type 2 diabetes and evaluated the relationship between HbAlc and blood glucose.
    Clinical laboratory science: journal of the American Society for Medical Technology 01/2014; 27(2):89-96.
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    ABSTRACT: Successful research outcomes require selection and implementation of the appropriate research design. A realistic sampling plan appropriate for the design is essential. Qualitative or quantitative methodology may be utilized, depending on the research question and goals. Quantitative research may be experimental where there is an intervention, or nonexperimental, if no intervention is included in the design. Causation can only be established with experimental research. Popular types of nonexperimental research include descriptive and survey research. Research findings may be disseminated via presentations, posters, and publications, such as abstracts and manuscripts.
    Clinical laboratory science: journal of the American Society for Medical Technology 01/2014; 27(4):237-44.
  • Clinical laboratory science: journal of the American Society for Medical Technology 01/2014; 27(2):119-26.
  • Clinical laboratory science: journal of the American Society for Medical Technology 01/2014; 27(2):112-8.
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    ABSTRACT: Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR) is a laboratory test of historical significance and broad applicability. Its current role in medical diagnostics, however, is often debated due to a lack of specificity in the results and the emergence of more up-to-date alternatives. This case study, however, illustrates a clinical scenario where the ESR was utilized on more than one occasion to significantly aid the diagnostic process and ultimately, improve patient care.
    Clinical laboratory science: journal of the American Society for Medical Technology 01/2014; 27(2):72-7.
  • Clinical laboratory science: journal of the American Society for Medical Technology 01/2014; 27(3):170-72.
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    ABSTRACT: A cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted comparing the polymerase chain reaction assay and traditional microbiological culture as screening tools for the identification of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in patients admitted to the pediatric and surgical intensive care units (PICU and SICU) at a 722 bed academic medical center. In addition, the cost benefits of identification of colonized MRSA patients were determined. The cost-effectiveness analysis employed actual hospital and laboratory costs, not patient costs. The actual cost of the PCR assay was higher than the microbiological culture identification of MRSA ($602.95 versus $364.30 per positive carrier identified). However, this did not include the decreased turn-around time of PCR assays compared to traditional culture techniques. Patient costs were determined indirectly in the cost-benefit analysis of clinical outcome. There was a reduction in MRSA hospital-acquired infection (3.5 MRSA HAI/month without screening versus 0.6/month with screening by PCR). A cost-benefit analysis based on differences in length of stay suggests an associated savings in hospitalization costs: MRSA HAI with 29.5 day median LOS at $63,810 versus MRSA identified on admission with 6 day median LOS at $14,561, a difference of $49,249 per hospitalization. Although this pilot study was small and it is not possible to directly relate the cost-effectiveness and cost-benefit analysis due to confounding factors such as patient underlying morbidity and mortality, a reduction of 2.9 MRSA HAI/month associated with PCR screening suggests potential savings in hospitalization costs of $142,822 per month.
    Clinical laboratory science: journal of the American Society for Medical Technology 01/2014; 27(1):13-20.
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    ABSTRACT: A review of professional literature was conducted to examine the history of the education of medical laboratory practitioners. This comprehensive review included historical educational milestones from the birth of medical technology to the advent of World War II. During this time period standards were developed by clinical pathologists for laboratory personnel and training programs. In addition, a formal educational model began to form and by the 1940's two years of college was required for matriculation into a medical technology program. Intertwined within the educational milestones are imprints of the evolution of critical thinking requirements and skills within the profession. For the first laboratory practitioners, critical thinking was not developed, discussed, or encouraged as duties were primarily repetitive promoting psychomotor skills.
    Clinical laboratory science: journal of the American Society for Medical Technology 01/2014; 27(4):204-8.
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    ABSTRACT: Rapid advancements in diagnostic technologies coupled with growth in testing options and choices mandate the development of evidence-based testing algorithms linked to the care paths of the major chronic diseases and health challenges encountered most frequently. As care paths are evaluated, patient/consumers become partners in healthcare delivery. Clinical laboratory scientists find themselves firmly embedded in both quality improvement and clinical research with an urgent need to translate clinical laboratory information into knowledge required by practitioners and patient/consumers alike. To implement this patient-centered care approach in clinical laboratory science, practitioners must understand their roles in (1) protecting patient/consumer autonomy in the healthcare informed consent process and (2) assuring patient/consumer privacy and confidentiality while blending quality improvement study findings with protected health information. A literature review, describing the current ethical environment, supports a consultative role for clinical laboratory scientists in the clinical decision-making process and suggests guidance for policy and practice regarding the principle of autonomy and its associated operational characteristics: informed consent and privacy.
    Clinical laboratory science: journal of the American Society for Medical Technology 01/2014; 27(4):222-30.
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    ABSTRACT: Good communication and critical thinking are essential skills for all successful professionals, including Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Laboratory Science (CLS/MLS) practitioners. Professional programs can incorporate writing assignments into their curricula to improve student written communication and critical thinking skills. Clearly defined, scenario-focused writing assignments provide student practice in clearly articulating responses to proposed problems or situations, researching and utilizing informational resources, and applying and synthesizing relevant information. Assessment rubrics, structured feedback, and revision writing methodologies help guide students through the writing process. This article describes how a CLS Program in a public academic medical center, located in the central United States (US) serving five centrally-located US states has incorporated writing intensive assignments into an existing 11-month academic year using formal, informal and reflective writing to improve student written communication and critical thinking skills. Faculty members and employers of graduates assert that incorporating writing intensive requirements have better prepared students for their professional role to effectively communicate and think critically.
    Clinical laboratory science: journal of the American Society for Medical Technology 01/2014; 27(4):194-203.
  • Clinical laboratory science: journal of the American Society for Medical Technology 01/2014; 27(1):4-5.