Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal

Publisher: Association on Employment Practices and Principles, Springer Verlag

Journal description

Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal published for the Council on Employee Responsibilities and Rights is an international interdisciplinary forum for the publication of peer-reviewed original papers (both theoretical and applied) of interest to all concerned with the ever-changing balance of rights and responsibilities between employer and employee. Papers derive from a broad range of disciplines including law economics sociology social psychology industrial relations administrative and organizational sciences communications and philosophy and ethics and use a variety of research methods and approaches including conceptual legal ethical eclectic and empirical analysis. The journal intends to foster development of the field of employee responsibilities and rights by encouraging basic research of solid scholarship and by linking such systematic study of the field to practical issues. Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal publishes general articles research articles brief reports case studies comments and book reviews.

Current impact factor: 0.00

Impact Factor Rankings

Additional details

5-year impact 0.00
Cited half-life 0.00
Immediacy index 0.00
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.00
Website Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal website
Other titles Employee responsibilities and rights journal (Online)
ISSN 0892-7545
OCLC 45091830
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Springer Verlag

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Author's pre-print on pre-print servers such as arXiv.org
    • Author's post-print on author's personal website immediately
    • Author's post-print on any open access repository after 12 months after publication
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set phrase to accompany link to published version (see policy)
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Bullying is widely recognised as a huge problem for workers, and the organisations employing them. While a great deal of workplace bullying research has already been done, two areas have not been adequately investigated: (1) the experiences of disabled workers being bullied, especially in light of their already disadvantaged work lives; and, (2) the multiple perspectives of all those involved in workplace bullying events – targets, third parties, and bullies (or those accused of bullying). This article responds directly to calls from past bullying researchers for more nuanced and sensitive analyses that include the use of creative writing (See Tracy et al., Management Communication Quarterly, 20(2), 148–185, 2006: 177). An in-depth, multiple perspective, semi-fictional case study is shared that showcases a disabled woman’s lived experience of being bullied out of her workplace after disclosing her diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) to her line manager.
    Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal 03/2015; 27(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Much has been written in recent years about the factors contributing to the current weakness of the US trade union movement. Union density in this country, for example, has not reached such a low level since 1916. Coinciding with organized labor’s decline over the last 30 years is the concomitant rise in economic inequality in the United States which became a rallying point for the Occupy Wall Street Movement when it was formed more than three years ago. More recently, increasing economic inequality has been reignited as a hot topic of conversation in the United States with the publication of the English translation of Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the Twenty-First Century in April 2014.The article published in this issue’s “Perspectives Section” deals with both topics – the decline of US organized labor and economic inequality. In this first-rate, perceptive, original and extremely well-written essay, Dr. Raymond L. Hogler, Professor of Management at Colorado State University; Dr. Herbe ...
    Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal 12/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Sexual harassment remains a persistent problem for businesses. Indeed, employers spend millions annually in sexual harassment litigation and liability costs. Furthermore, current U.S. law effectively makes it management's responsibility to implement programs to prevent and correct harassment, or else face heightened liability. A common element of prevention programs is training, especially for employees in positions of authority. Several states have gone so far as to mandate sexual harassment training. However, little research exists to demonstrate the efficacy of such training programs. It is known that training sensitizes people in recognizing harassment. However, no research has indicated that training enables managers to accurately identify harassment and respond appropriately. This exploratory study addresses this issue by examining whether training quantity (i.e., cumulative training hours), training variety (i.e., the number of training methods employed), and training recency (i.e., the elapsed time since training) predict a manager's ability to (a) accurately identify sexual harassment and (b) recommend an appropriate response. Results suggest that, while training increases sensitivity, training is associated with decreased accuracy in identification of sexual harassment. No relationship was found among the predictor variables and manager accuracy in recommending an appropriate response. Implications concerning these results are offered along with directions for future research.
    Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal 12/2014; 26(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: While there is a growing interest in workplace spirituality, much of that focus excludes religion even though the vast majority of people are affiliated with a religious tradition. Attempts to bring one’s “whole self” to work can be problematic for those who are religious because of concerns of offense or proselytizing. This phenomenological study explored the lived experience of a group of 15 professional employees who were personally religious while also remaining open to religious pluralism in the workplace. This group was largely Christian, and was chosen from participants in leadership seminars and graduate courses in the United States. Analysis revealed four different postures used by participants to express openness toward religious difference. These approaches are described in detail, and the implications of these finding for the advancement of pluralism in the workplace are considered.
    Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal 12/2014; 26(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: How has Harry Braverman’s book Labor and Monopoly Capital, published forty years ago, stood the test of time? In this essay I argue that it remains a vital text for understanding the capitalist labor process. But I also address three lacunae in Braverman’s book. First, it overlooked limits to deskilling, such as the challenge of standardizing services; second, Braverman refused to concede that states could provide workers with material welfare, which can protect them from the labor market; and third, Labor and Monopoly Capital’s vision of the future is unnecessarily pessimistic. Standardization and automation can degrade work, but they also generate surplus that can potentially expand human freedom. Braverman’s critical analysis of production begs an equally critical account of exchange and distribution.
    Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal 12/2014; 26(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In this issue’s Perspectives section, a second article appears commemorating the fortieth anniversary of the 1974 seminal publication of Harry Braverman’s Labor and Monopoly Capital: The Degradation of Work in the Twentieth Century (Monthly Review Press). (The first article acknowledging Braverman’s significant contributions was published in the September 2014 issue). In this superbly and smartly written article, Dr. Jeffrey Sallaz, Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Arizona, argues that Labor and Monopoly Capital is an essential volume for comprehending the capitalist labor process. Nevertheless, Sallaz points out that there are omissions in Braverman’s analysis which are crucial for analyzing work in the twenty-first century. First, Braverman neglected to understand that the process of deskilling is constrained, especially with regards to service industries which have come to dominate US employment in the second decade of the twenty-first century. Second, Sallaz co ...
    Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal 12/2014; 26(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Many people with disabilities continue being unemployed or underemployed. One way to rectify this situation is through leveraging the services of disability training and placement agencies which can appropriately train candidates with a disability and then connect them with potential employers. Unfortunately, employers profess ignorance about the availability of such services, such service agencies, and continue being wary of employing people with disabilities. In the present article, based on interviews with twelve policy makers in five agencies, we examine services offered by such agencies. Results showed that agencies engage in the following four roles when trying to secure employment for candidates with a disability- the Facilitator, the Trainer, the Marketer, and the Partner. Based on present findings, we note a few broad recommendations for employers with regards formulating their disability policies.
    Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal 09/2014; 26(3).
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The 1974 publication of Harry Braverman’s Labor and Monopoly Capital: The Degradation of Work in the Twentieth Century (Monthly Review Press) marked a seminal moment in U.S. intellectual history. The appearance of this landmark sociological volume renewed interest among historians and sociologists in industrial sociology, a field contained within the sociology of work. The book was instrumental in inaugurating the “labor process debate” which led to extensive research and writing occurring in Labor Process Theory (LPT). Specifically, LPT examines how employees work, the skills utilized in the work process, the control of work, how employees are remunerated for their work and employee resistance to managerial control.In a nutshell, Braverman argued in Labor and Monopoly Capital that the implementation of scientific management (or Taylorism, named after Frederick Winslow Taylor) resulted in the deskilling and routinization of tasks performed by blue-collar workers in factories as well as
    Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal 09/2014; 26(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Although women in general are aware of and concerned about the gender wage gap, individual women do not report significantly greater dissatisfaction with their pay, which has been termed “the paradox of the contented female worker” (Crosby 1982). The current study proposes a model of the factors leading to pay satisfaction to explain this paradox based on Major’s (Advances in Experimental Social Psychology 26:293–355, 1994) work on entitlement. In general, support was found for the hypothesized relationships. The results of this study indicate that although women have lower pay, they do not necessarily feel entitled to higher pay, and thus are not dissatisfied with pay. Women also tended to select female referents who are lower paid, which may account for some of their lower feelings of entitlement. Additionally, although men and women did not differ in the value placed on pay, value of pay was found to relate negatively to pay satisfaction. Based on these findings, researchers interested in pay satisfaction are encouraged to investigate additional personal and situational characteristics that affect referent choice and perceptions of fair pay.
    Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal 09/2014; 26(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The fortieth anniversary of Harry Braverman’s Labor and Monopoly Capital is the occasion here for a reassessment of his work as a whole. Braverman’s analysis of the degradation of work is shown to have been only a part of a much larger argument he was developing on the structure of the U.S. working class. Building on his pioneering empirical research into occupational composition, a new empirical assessment of the structural evolution of the U.S. working class over the last four decades is provided, throwing light on current problems of unemployment, underemployment, and socially wasted labor—and the rights of labor.
    Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal 09/2014; 26(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To date, the discussion of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) has consistently addressed organizational activities, which are the focus of measures that are able to evaluate CSR in enterprises. However, the psychosocial characteristics of CSR have remained relatively unexplored. Indeed, some scholars have recently proposed that both the perspective-taking (as a cognitive dimension of CSR) and propensity to take care (as an affective dimension of CSR) of different stakeholders are related to sustainable and socially responsible organizational behaviors (as the behavioral dimension of CSR), thus fostering the development of CSR within enterprises that take a multi-stakeholder approach. According to this psychosocial perspective, we propose and test a multidimensional Psychosocial CSR (P-CSR) scale to measure organizational engagement in corporate social responsibility with regard to multiple stakeholders. By linking the cognitive, affective, and behavioral dimensions of CSR to the propensity of business professionals to enhance their environmental and social ethics, we offer a more complete description of how CSR involving multiple stakeholders arises in enterprises. A survey of 345 business professionals—including both employers and employees—of Italian Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) completed a self-reported questionnaire. Based on the psychosocial perspective, we found that multi-stakeholder-oriented perspective-taking, propensity to take care, and socially responsible behaviors are part of the same construct, leading to an exhaustive explanation of CSR at the organizational level. Moreover, we developed both theoretical and practical implications for the promotion of CSR in organizational contexts, especially among SMEs.
    Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal 09/2014; 26(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study examines the impact of across domain social support, work-family conflict (WFC) and job satisfaction, and explores the influence of family role allocations among these relationships. Family roles include breadwinner and caregiver. Direct effects were found for two types of support and both WFC and job satisfaction. Additionally, results provided some evidence that family roles moderated the support-outcome relationship, particularly for caregivers. The research and practical implications, as well as limitations of this study are discussed.
    Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal 06/2014; 26(2).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Workplace bullying and workplace corruption are both disturbing workplace phenomena. However, despite considerable research into both, there remains insufficient understanding of either, including scant recognition that, at times, they may intersect. A critical review of what have been hitherto quite separate literatures is undertaken for the purpose of developing a research agenda that recognises the potential areas of overlap. Rather than isolating and distinguishing the two constructs, or attempting to link or explain their complex causes, secondary analysis of the respective literatures is critically undertaken to showcase the possible overlaps that can exist. What is presented is evidence from the literature that, sometimes, acts of workplace bullying are also acts of corruption, and have rarely been recognised as such previously. Recognising this overlap is intended to encourage the emergence of a new, and much needed, research agenda. Increased understanding of both these harmful workplace phenomena can then emerge to make our workplaces safer—for employees, employers, and the organisations that employ them.
    Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal 06/2014; 26(2).
  • Source
    Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal 06/2014; 26(2).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study examined workplace religious accommodation disputes under Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act. We analyzed spirituality and religion in the workplace (SRW) legal disputes between 2000 and 2011, using case facts from 83 U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals decisions. Utilizing a multi-step cluster analysis methodology and thematic coding, we defined behaviors associated with court cases and demographics of actors in the cases. We found 15 distinct workplace behaviors that appear in SRW legal disputes, and seven demographic or descriptive labels. Cluster analysis using Jaccard’s index and MDS revealed multiple behavioral co-occurrences, indicating that certain problematic behaviors tend to occur together in the workplace. We also found that certain behaviors occur alone, potentially being problematic in themselves. Using religious identity theory and self-referencing theory as frameworks, we fit both behaviors and demographics into an explanatory model for our outcomes, providing insight into organizational conditions that may precede religious accommodation disputes that escalate into legal action. We end the article with a discussion of future research avenues.
    Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal 06/2014; 26(2).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Between 1995 and 2004, Kate Bronfenbrenner wrote several studies arguing that union organizing would be more successful if certain tactics were used. Bronfenbrenner’s methodology seemed unassailable and her opinions were influential among union leaders, but organizing outcomes did not improve. To understand why, this study asked highly successful union organizers for their views. Their responses point to an entirely different conceptualization of the organizing process. Rather than follow a certain recipe, respondents saw their first priority as building relationships of trust with workers. Then, organizers and workers together could develop tactics tailored to the particular situation. If organizing success most requires relation-building skills and creativity, then it is more important for unions to hire the right organizers than to employ a given tactical formula.
    Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal 06/2014; 26(2).
  • Source
    Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal 03/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Few studies on sexual harassment and mental health have examined the stress-buffering question for union women. Our study examined the moderating effect of two perceptual moderators—perceived union tolerance for sexual harassment and perceived union support—as they relate to harassment and mental health with the intent of identifying conditions under which the toxicity of harassment is reduced. Our conceptualization of social support as a coping resource in conjunction with interpersonal support as a preferred coping strategy was used to explain reduced toxicity under conditions of low perceived union tolerance for harassment and high perceived union support in a sample of 150 women from multiple unions. Implications for future research and union policy and practice on harassment are discussed.
    Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal 03/2014;