Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal

Publisher: Association on Employment Practices and Principles, Springer Verlag

Description

Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal published for the Council on Employee Responsibilities and Rights is an international interdisciplinary forum for the publication of peer-reviewed original papers (both theoretical and applied) of interest to all concerned with the ever-changing balance of rights and responsibilities between employer and employee. Papers derive from a broad range of disciplines including law economics sociology social psychology industrial relations administrative and organizational sciences communications and philosophy and ethics and use a variety of research methods and approaches including conceptual legal ethical eclectic and empirical analysis. The journal intends to foster development of the field of employee responsibilities and rights by encouraging basic research of solid scholarship and by linking such systematic study of the field to practical issues. Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal publishes general articles research articles brief reports case studies comments and book reviews.

  • Impact factor
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  • 5-year impact
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  • Cited half-life
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  • Immediacy index
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  • Website
    Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal website
  • Other titles
    Employee responsibilities and rights journal (Online)
  • ISSN
    0892-7545
  • OCLC
    45091830
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Springer Verlag

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Authors own final version only can be archived
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On author's website or institutional repository
    • On funders designated website/repository after 12 months at the funders request or as a result of legal obligation
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set phrase to accompany link to published version (The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com)
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Workplace bullying and workplace corruption are both disturbing workplace phenomena. However, despite considerable research into both, there remains insufficient understanding of either, including scant recognition that, at times, they may intersect. A critical review of what have been hitherto quite separate literatures is undertaken for the purpose of developing a research agenda that recognises the potential areas of overlap. Rather than isolating and distinguishing the two constructs, or attempting to link or explain their complex causes, secondary analysis of the respective literatures is critically undertaken to showcase the possible overlaps that can exist. What is presented is evidence from the literature that, sometimes, acts of workplace bullying are also acts of corruption, and have rarely been recognised as such previously. Recognising this overlap is intended to encourage the emergence of a new, and much needed, research agenda. Increased understanding of both these harmful workplace phenomena can then emerge to make our workplaces safer—for employees, employers, and the organisations that employ them.
    Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal 06/2014; 26(2).
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    ABSTRACT: Between 1995 and 2004, Kate Bronfenbrenner wrote several studies arguing that union organizing would be more successful if certain tactics were used. Bronfenbrenner’s methodology seemed unassailable and her opinions were influential among union leaders, but organizing outcomes did not improve. To understand why, this study asked highly successful union organizers for their views. Their responses point to an entirely different conceptualization of the organizing process. Rather than follow a certain recipe, respondents saw their first priority as building relationships of trust with workers. Then, organizers and workers together could develop tactics tailored to the particular situation. If organizing success most requires relation-building skills and creativity, then it is more important for unions to hire the right organizers than to employ a given tactical formula.
    Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal 06/2014; 26(2).
  • Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal 06/2014; 26(2).
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    ABSTRACT: This study examined workplace religious accommodation disputes under Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act. We analyzed spirituality and religion in the workplace (SRW) legal disputes between 2000 and 2011, using case facts from 83 U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals decisions. Utilizing a multi-step cluster analysis methodology and thematic coding, we defined behaviors associated with court cases and demographics of actors in the cases. We found 15 distinct workplace behaviors that appear in SRW legal disputes, and seven demographic or descriptive labels. Cluster analysis using Jaccard’s index and MDS revealed multiple behavioral co-occurrences, indicating that certain problematic behaviors tend to occur together in the workplace. We also found that certain behaviors occur alone, potentially being problematic in themselves. Using religious identity theory and self-referencing theory as frameworks, we fit both behaviors and demographics into an explanatory model for our outcomes, providing insight into organizational conditions that may precede religious accommodation disputes that escalate into legal action. We end the article with a discussion of future research avenues.
    Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal 06/2014; 26(2).
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    ABSTRACT: This study examines the impact of across domain social support, work-family conflict (WFC) and job satisfaction, and explores the influence of family role allocations among these relationships. Family roles include breadwinner and caregiver. Direct effects were found for two types of support and both WFC and job satisfaction. Additionally, results provided some evidence that family roles moderated the support-outcome relationship, particularly for caregivers. The research and practical implications, as well as limitations of this study are discussed.
    Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal 06/2014; 26(2).
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    ABSTRACT: Past research has examined reactions to traditional, gender- and ethnicity-based affirmative action programs. However, research has not examined reactions to affirmative action based on socioeconomic status (SES), even though such programs are promoted by the U.S. government (e.g., Work Opportunity Tax Credit) and thus act as a de facto supplement to traditional affirmative action. Based in theories of self-interest, Study 1 compared reactions of men and women to a traditional affirmative action program and a hypothetical, SES-based affirmative action program in terms of general perceptions of such programs and organizational attractiveness. While women had more positive reactions to traditional affirmative action, men had more positive reactions to SES-based affirmative action. Study 2 took a different approach, examining the reactions of potential job applicants to four hypothetical job ads which included different types of diversity statements. We found that job ads that mentioned any type of specific diversity statement - either based on race and gender or based on SES - were perceived as less fair than job ads that did not include specific diversity statements. Results of the studies are discussed in terms of self-interest theories of affirmative action and considerations of SES-based programs as a supplement to traditional affirmative action.
    Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal 03/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Motivation theories in the management and organizational behavior literature represent researchers’ attempts to understand the processes that cause people to act productively in the context of the employment relationship, for the benefit of their employers (Miner Organizational behavior, performance and productivity New-York: Random-House 1988). These theories attempt to develop tools that will enable managers to make their employees’ behavior cost-effective and directed toward the achievement of the organization’s goals. From this perspective, motivational and marketing practices are quite similar, especially if we compare motivational and advertising practices. The goal of both is to propel people into behaving in a way that will benefit the organization. This paper examines what the well-developed criticism of advertising and marketing practices can teach us about the use of motivational practices in work organizations. Following Bishop’s (Business Ethics Quarterly 10: 371–398, 2000) framework of the moral issues raised by ads, this paper critically investigates the moral meaning of classic motivational theories and practices and their implications for both theoreticians and practitioners.
    Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal 03/2014; 26(1).
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Few studies on sexual harassment and mental health have examined the stress-buffering question for union women. Our study examined the moderating effect of two perceptual moderators—perceived union tolerance for sexual harassment and perceived union support—as they relate to harassment and mental health with the intent of identifying conditions under which the toxicity of harassment is reduced. Our conceptualization of social support as a coping resource in conjunction with interpersonal support as a preferred coping strategy was used to explain reduced toxicity under conditions of low perceived union tolerance for harassment and high perceived union support in a sample of 150 women from multiple unions. Implications for future research and union policy and practice on harassment are discussed.
    Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal 03/2014;
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    Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: This paper explores the potential conflict between employment protections afforded to individuals with bipolar disorder, and employers’ obligations to maintain a safe working environment for others in the workplace. Both the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the Americans with Disabilities Act Amendments Act of 2008 (ADAA) provide workplace protections to those employees or applicants who are classified as qualified individuals with a disability. A disability is “a substantial impairment—a physical or mental impairment—in a major life activity that would substantially limit that major life activity.” ( 42 U.S.C. §§ 12102(1)(A)-(C)), and “mental impairment” is defined to include individuals with bipolar disorder (42 U.S.C. § 1630.2(h)(2)). These statutes further impose a requirement on employers to make reasonable accommodations for such individuals. In essence, they protect the bipolar employee from any discrimination in the workplace based on their disability, to include harassment by coworkers. However, employers may find themselves caught on the horns of a dilemma. Depending on the nature and severity of the bipolar employee’s conduct toward coworkers, they may also be exposed to liability for harm done to coworkers under negligent retention laws, or even the anti-harassment provisions of other equal employment statutes. If a bipolar employee’s negative behaviors toward coworkers are sufficiently severe or pervasive, they can result in coworkers suffering harassment sufficient to constitute actionable conduct under the ADA. To reduce exposure to litigation, employers must understand both their obligations under the ADA, and the nature of bipolar disorder.
    Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal 12/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: While the high prevalence of mental illness in workplaces is more readily documented in the literature than it was ten or so years ago, it continues to remain largely within the medical and health sciences fields. This may account for the lack of information about mental illness in workplaces (Dewa et al. Healthcare Papers 5:12–25, 2004) by operational managers and human resource departments even though such illnesses effect on average 17 % to 20 % of employees in any 12-month period (MHCC 2012; SAMHSA 2010; ABS 2007). As symptoms of mental illness have the capacity to impact negatively on employee work performance and/or attendance, the ramifications on employee performance management systems can be significant, particularly when employees choose to deliberately conceal their illness, such that any work concerns appear to derive from issues other than illness (Dewa et al. Healthcare Papers 5:12–25, 2004; De Lorenzo 2003). When employee non-disclosure of a mental illness impacts negatively in the workplace, it presents a very challenging issue in relation to performance management for both operational managers and human resource staff. Without documented medical evidence to show that impaired work performance and/or attendance is attributable to a mental illness, the issue of performance management arises. Currently, when there is no documented medical illness, performance management policies are often brought into place to improve employee performance and/or attendance by establishing achievable employee targets. Yet, given that in any twelve-month period at least a fifth of the workforce sustains a mental illness (MHCC 2012; SAMHSA 2010; ABS 2007), and that non-disclosure is significant (Barney et al. BMC Public Health 9:1–11, 2009; Munir et al. Social Science & Medicine 60:1397–1407, 2005) such targets may be unachievable for employees with a hidden mental illness. It is for these reasons that this paper reviews the incidence of mental illness in western economies, its costs, and the reasons why it is often concealed and proposes the adoption of what are termed ‘Buffer Stage’ policies as an added tool that organisations may wish to utilise in the management of hidden medical illnesses such as mental illness.
    Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal 12/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract The group organization of work in the British coal mining industry brought to the workers involved significant levels of autonomy; the ability to define the social relations of work; high levels of control over the labor process; and a strong and lasting commitment - to the group. This autonomy was to survive a series of managerial attacks, in the form of changed payment systems and the introduction of new technologies, and was not finally lost until the imposition of full automation that included surveillance systems that made the labor process transparent. Key words Autonomy. Control . Group work . Labor process . Mining . Social relations of work
    Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal 07/2012; Volume 24,,(Number 3):Page 219-236.
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    ABSTRACT: This paper explores the effects of migratory work on family life. Focusing on migrant workers from the post-industrial mining communities of Cape Breton Island, it identifies the stressors of separation on different types of family structures, and offers a discussion on a range of possible remedial strategies.
    Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal 02/2012; 24(2).
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    ABSTRACT: We integrate the concept of signaling theory to propose that organizations create psychological and legal contracts through their human resource management practices (HRM). Focusing on the strength of the signal generated by HRM practices, we develop a framework for contract creation. Specifically, we define and outline how weak signals generate psychological contracts and strong signals develop legally binding contracts. We provide several examples of HRM hiring practices, the weak and strong signals which they emit and the psychological and legal contracts which they create. Our key contribution is to provide a precise model for understanding the distinction between a psychological and legal contract. Key wordsPsychological contracts–Legal contracts–Signaling theory–Human resource management practices
    Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal 01/2011; 23(3):187-204.
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    ABSTRACT: When the merged union UNITE HERE was recently torn apart by internal dissent, the labor movement’s attention turned to some longstanding questions about how union mergers are negotiated, why some fail and others succeed, how members are affected by merger, and how the big, diverse unions created by mergers—the super-unions—manage to stay intact. This article addresses these questions, arguing throughout that little is actually known about the union merger process and outcomes. In doing so, it also suggests that some union mergers, such as the one forming UNITE HERE, may not always make sense and that bigger unions created by mergers are not necessarily better unions. Key wordsunion mergers-UNITE/HERE-union structure-UNITE-HERE
    Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal 01/2010; 22(2):149-156.
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    ABSTRACT: Despite the passage of almost two decades since the enactment of the Americans With Disabilities Act in the United States, individuals with disabilities are still underrepresented in the workforce, tend to hold lower status jobs, and receive lower wages. This study examines whether disabled workers also continue to encounter more negative workplace experiences in terms of discrimination and injustice. A sample of 1,880 employees of a large university, including 90 self-identified disabled individuals completed a work experience survey. Analyses indicate that disabled employees reported more overt and subtle discrimination and more procedural injustice than their non-disabled counter-parts. Examination by the type of disability also revealed that those with non-physical disabilities reported more negative experiences than employees with physical disabilities. Perceived organizational and supervisory support were shown to have promise in reducing the effects of disability status on workplace attitudes and perceptions.
    Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal 01/2010; 22:5-19.
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    ABSTRACT: There is a long, interdisciplinary tradition of examining why organizations remove privileges from members as a part of disciplinary action. In contrast, little is known about why organizations return privileges after disciplinary action has occurred. Nonetheless, such reinstatement is ubiquitous in organizations. This paper provides a starting point for a theory of reinstatement by using the emerging theoretical domain of relationship repair. Treating reinstatement as relationship repair highlights the importance of causal attribution, social equilibrium, relationship structure, and power as means of relationship repair. The paper uses these four bases of relationship repair to develop a series of specific motivations for why managers might reinstate privileges. Key wordsreinstatement-employee discipline-organizational punishment-intra-organizational relations
    Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal 01/2010; 22(4):279-295.

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