Infectious Disease Clinics of North America (INFECT DIS CLIN N AM )

Publisher: Elsevier

Description

Each issue of Infectious Disease Clinics reviews new diagnostic and management techniques for a single clinical problem--and makes them simple to apply. Its concise, comprehensive, and its editors and authors are respected experts.

Impact factor 2.31

  • Hide impact factor history
     
    Impact factor
  • 5-year impact
    2.81
  • Cited half-life
    7.70
  • Immediacy index
    0.67
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.99
  • Website
    Infectious Disease Clinics website
  • Other titles
    Infectious disease clinics of North America, Infectious disease clinics
  • ISSN
    0891-5520
  • OCLC
    14781687
  • Material type
    Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

Elsevier

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Pre-print allowed on any website or open access repository
    • Voluntary deposit by author of authors post-print allowed on authors' personal website, arXiv.org or institutions open scholarly website including Institutional Repository, without embargo, where there is not a policy or mandate
    • Deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate only allowed where separate agreement between repository and the publisher exists.
    • Permitted deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate, may be required to comply with embargo periods of 12 months to 48 months .
    • Set statement to accompany deposit
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to journal home page or articles' DOI
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • NIH Authors articles will be submitted to PubMed Central after 12 months
    • Publisher last contacted on 18/10/2013
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • Infectious Disease Clinics of North America 03/2015; 29(1).
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    ABSTRACT: Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the most common cause of infectious health care-associated diarrhea and is a major burden to patients and the health care system. The incidence and severity of CDI remain at historically high levels. This article reviews the morbidity, mortality, and costs associated with CDI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Infectious Disease Clinics of North America 03/2015; 29(1):123-134.
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    ABSTRACT: This article discusses the use of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) for the treatment of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). The disruption of the normal gut microbiota is central to the pathogenesis of CDI, and disruption persists in recurrent disease. The use of FMT for recurrent CDI is characterized by a high response rate and short term safety is excellent, although the long-term effects of FMT are as yet unknown. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Infectious Disease Clinics of North America 03/2015; 29(1):109-122.
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    ABSTRACT: Exposure to antibiotics is the major risk factor for Clostridium difficile diarrhea (CDD), suggesting that impairment of colonization resistance due to depletion of the gut flora is a significant underlying disease susceptibility factor. Many properties of probiotic organisms indicate that they may be able to replenish the depleted gut flora and restore colonization resistance. However, despite numerous clinical trials, the evidence base for probiotics in the prevention of CDD remains weak. A recent large trial of a multistrain, high-dose probiotic did not show clear evidence of efficacy. The role of probiotics in the prevention of CDD remains unclear. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Infectious Disease Clinics of North America 03/2015; 29(1):135-144.
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    ABSTRACT: Clostridium difficile is a spore-forming anaerobic gram-positive organism that is the leading cause of antibiotic-associated nosocomial infectious diarrhea in the Western world. This article describes the evolving epidemiology of C difficile infection (CDI) in the twenty-first century, evaluates the importance of vaccines against the disease, and defines the roles of both innate and adaptive host immune responses in CDI. The effects of passive immunotherapy and active vaccination against CDI in both humans and animals are also discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Infectious Disease Clinics of North America 03/2015; 29(1):145-162.
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    ABSTRACT: Asymptomatic carriage of toxigenic strains of Clostridium difficile is common in health care facilities and the community. However, infection control efforts have traditionally focused almost entirely on symptomatic patients. There is now growing concern that asymptomatic carriers may be an underappreciated source of transmission. This article provides an overview of the pathogenesis and epidemiology of C difficile colonization, reviews the evidence that asymptomatic carriers shed spores and contribute to transmission, and examines practical issues related to prevention of transmission from carriers. Published by Elsevier Inc.
    Infectious Disease Clinics of North America 01/2015; 29(1).
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    ABSTRACT: Accurate diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is important not only for patient care but also for epidemiology and disease research. As it is not possible clinically to reliably differentiate CDI from other causes of health care-associated diarrhea, the laboratory confirmation of CDI is essential. Rapid commercial assays, including nucleic acid amplification tests and immunoassays for C difficile toxin and glutamate dehydrogenase, have largely superseded the use of older assays. Although assays that detect the presence of free C difficile toxin in feces are less frequently positive than tests for organism, they are preferable for the detection of CDI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Infectious Disease Clinics of North America 01/2015; 29(1).
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    ABSTRACT: In vivo and in vitro models are widely used to simulate Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). They have made considerable contributions in the study of C difficile pathogenesis, antibiotic predisposition to CDI, and population dynamics as well as the evaluation of new antimicrobial and immunologic therapeutics. Although CDI models have greatly increased understanding of this complicated pathogen, all have limitations in reproducing human disease, notably their inability to generate a truly reflective immune response. This review summarizes the most commonly used models of CDI and discusses their pros and cons and their predictive values in terms of clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Infectious Disease Clinics of North America 01/2015; 29(1).
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    ABSTRACT: The view of Clostridium difficile infection as a hospital-acquired infection transmitted only by symptomatic patients is changing. Although C difficile is present in food for human consumption, food-borne infection caused by C difficile has never been confirmed. More information on the infective dose and the level of contamination is needed to determine the risk for food-borne exposure to C difficile in humans. The emergence of C difficile polymerase chain reaction (PCR) ribotype 078 in humans is epidemiologically linked to its presence in piglets and calves and their environment, suggesting zoonotic transmission. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Infectious Disease Clinics of North America 01/2015; 29(1).
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    ABSTRACT: This article describes the global changes in Clostridium difficile epidemiology since the late twentieth century and into the twenty-first century when the new epidemic strain BI/NAP1/027 emerged. The article provides an overview of how understanding of C difficile epidemiology has rapidly evolved since its initial association with colitis in 1974. It also discusses how C difficile has spread across the globe, the role of asymptomatic carriers in disease transmission, the increased recognition of C difficile outside health care settings, the changes in epidemiology of C difficile infection in children, and the risk factors for disease. Published by Elsevier Inc.
    Infectious Disease Clinics of North America 01/2015; 29(1).
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    ABSTRACT: Acquisition of Clostridium difficile spores can be followed by a spectrum of clinical outcomes ranging from asymptomatic transit through the bowel to severe colitis and death. This clinical variability is a product of bacterial virulence and host susceptibility to the pathogen. It is important to identify patients at high risk of poor outcome so that increased monitoring and optimal treatment strategies can be instigated. This article discusses the evidence linking strain type to clinical outcome, including the importance of toxin and nontoxin virulence factors. It reviews host factors and their relationship with C difficile infection susceptibility, recurrence, and mortality. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Infectious Disease Clinics of North America 01/2015; 29(1).
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    ABSTRACT: Clostridium difficile is associated with a spectrum of clinical manifestations ranging from asymptomatic carriage to severe life-threatening pseudomembranous colitis. Current perspectives indicate that C difficile pathogenesis is a multifactorial disease process dictated by pathogenic toxin production, gut microbial dysbiosis, and altered host inflammatory responses. This article summarizes recent findings underpinning the cellular and molecular mechanisms regulating bacterial virulence and sheds new light on the critical roles of the host immune response, intestinal microbiota, and metabolome in mediating disease pathogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Infectious Disease Clinics of North America 01/2015; 29(1).
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    ABSTRACT: The control of Clostridium difficile infection is paramount. C difficile spores are difficult to eradicate and can survive on surfaces for prolonged periods of time. Hand washing with either plain or antimicrobial soap is effective in removing C difficile spores from hands. Patients should be placed in private rooms and under contact precautions to prevent transmission to other patients. Regular hospital germicides are not sporicidal and hypochlorite solutions are required for surface disinfection. In outbreak situations, a multifaceted approach is required. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Infectious Disease Clinics of North America 01/2015; 29(1).
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    ABSTRACT: Vancomycin and metronidazole were historically considered equivalent therapies for the management of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI); however, recent data confirm more favorable outcomes with vancomycin. Fidaxomicin is a narrow spectrum antibiotic that has an advantage in reducing recurrence rates compared with vancomycin, possibly owing to its sparing effect on normal colonic microbiota. Data are limited for guiding management of CDI recurrences, particularly multiple recurrences. Several empiric approaches to manage these cases are reviewed. Published by Elsevier Inc.
    Infectious Disease Clinics of North America 01/2015; 29(1).
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    ABSTRACT: Condoms remain the most effective barrier against the sexual transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Male condoms have proven to be 80% to 90% effective, and female condoms have similar results. Poor adherence and improper use limit their effectiveness. In addition to condoms, microbicides are a promising barrier against HIV transmission. More than 50 candidate topical microbicide compounds have undergone preclinical or clinical testing in the last 10 years, but there are currently no US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved compounds. Rectal microbicides are also being developed, as anal receptive sex is an effective mode of HIV transmission. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Infectious Disease Clinics of North America 12/2014; 28(4):585-599.
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    ABSTRACT: The reproductive health needs of all women of childbearing age should routinely address effective and appropriate contraception, safer sex practices, and elimination of alcohol, illicit drugs and tobacco should pregnancy occur. Combined antepartum, intrapartum, and infant antiretroviral (ARV) prophylaxis are recommended because ARV drugs reduce perinatal transmission by several mechanisms, including lowering maternal viral load and providing infant pre- and post-exposure prophylaxis. Scheduled cesarean delivery at 38 weeks with IV AZT decreases the risk of perinatal transmission if the HIV RNA is greater than 1000 copies/mL or if HIV levels are unknown near the time of delivery. Oral AZT should generally be given for at least 6 weeks to all infants perinatally exposed to HIV to reduce perinatal transmission of HIV. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Infectious Disease Clinics of North America 12/2014; 28(4):529-547.
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    ABSTRACT: Although some success was achieved in recent years in HIV prevention, an effective vaccine remains the means with the most potential of curtailing HIV-1 infections worldwide. Despite multiple failed attempts, a recent HIV vaccine regimen demonstrated modest protection from infection. Although the protective efficacy in this trial was not sufficient to warrant licensure, it spurred renewed optimism in the field and has provided valuable insights for improving future vaccine designs. This review summarizes the pertinent details of vaccine development and discusses ways the field is moving forward to develop a vaccine to prevent HIV infection and disease progression.
    Infectious Disease Clinics of North America 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Remarkable advances have been made in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection, but in the entire history of the epidemic, only 1 patient has been cured. Herein we review the fundamental mechanisms that render HIV-1 infection difficult to cure and then discuss recent clinical and experimental situations in which some form of cure has been achieved. Finally, we consider approaches that are currently being taken to develop a general cure for HIV-1 infection.
    Infectious Disease Clinics of North America 09/2014;
  • Infectious Disease Clinics of North America 09/2014; 28(3):xiii-xiv.