Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.) (ONCOLOGY-NY )

Description

Impact factor 2.98

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    Impact factor
  • 5-year impact
    2.52
  • Cited half-life
    7.90
  • Immediacy index
    0.49
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.79
  • Website
    Oncology website
  • Other titles
    Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.: Online)
  • ISSN
    0890-9091
  • OCLC
    60628022
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.) 01/2015; 29(1).
  • Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.) 01/2015; 29(1).
  • Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.) 01/2015; 29(1).
  • Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.) 01/2015; 29(1).
  • Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.) 01/2015; 29(1).
  • Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.) 01/2015; 29(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Bisphosphonates have played an important role in the treatment of breast cancer, mainly in patients with bone metastasis, by reducing the risk of fracture, spinal cord compression, and hypercalcemia. Both oral and intravenous products are available and have strong supporting clinical evidence. Zoledronic acid, the most frequently used intravenous agent, has traditionally been given on a monthly dosing schedule. A novel every-12-weeks maintenance dosing schedule shows clinical equivalence and promises to improve safety, affordability, and quality of care. The Early Breast Cancer Trialists' Collaborative Group has recently helped clarify the controversial benefit of bisphosphonates in the adjuvant setting. Based on their meta-analysis, we now have strong evidence supporting the use of adjuvant bisphosphonates to help prevent the development of bone metastasis in postmenopausal breast cancer patients, which leads to a significant improvement in breast cancer-specific survival. We eagerly await the full publication of this practice-changing study, which continues the incremental advance of the treatment of patients with breast cancer.
    Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.) 01/2015; 29(1).
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    ABSTRACT: Cytotoxic chemotherapy with doxorubicin in combination with ifosfamide or dacarbazine, or gemcitabine in combination with docetaxel, continues to be the mainstay of treatment of metastatic soft-tissue sarcomas. A goal-oriented approach that includes careful consideration of histology, performance status, sites of disease, patient goals, and intent of treatment is vital to the formulation of an effective treatment plan. Both single-agent and combination chemotherapy regimens are available and should be chosen carefully to fit the clinical situation and patient goals. In patients with localized soft-tissue sarcoma who have a high likelihood of recurrent disease, systemic therapy should be strongly considered. The ability to demonstrate efficacy in the neoadjuvant setting may help avoid unnecessary treatment-related toxicity in patients with poor response and maximize recurrence-free survival in patients who do demonstrate an excellent response to therapy.
    Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.) 01/2015; 29(1).
  • Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.) 12/2014; 28(12).
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    ABSTRACT: Gliomas classified as grade II by the World Health Organization (WHO) include astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas, and mixed oligoastrocytomas. This heterogeneous group of conditions is associated with a more favorable prognosis and longer-term survival than high-grade gliomas (HGGs). Neurosurgical resection and radiation therapy improve survival in symptomatic, progressive, or high-risk grade II gliomas. Until recently, the role of chemotherapy has been less clear. This review draws on insights from the management of HGGs and emerging data on the addition of PCV (procarbazine, lomustine [CCNU], and vincristine) to radiation for these neoplasms. Specifically, this review focuses on the current status of chemotherapeutic management of grade II gliomas, including optimal timing of treatment, and management of 1p19q codeleted and non-codeleted tumors.
    Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.) 12/2014; 28(12).
  • Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.) 12/2014; 28(12).
  • Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.) 12/2014; 28(12).
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this article is to present an updated set of American College of Radiology consensus guidelines formed from an expert panel on the appropriate use of radiation therapy in postprostatectomy prostate cancer. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 3 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances where evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. Recent and relevant literature reviewed by the panel led to establishment of criteria for appropriate use of radiation therapy in postprostatectomy prostate cancer. The discussion includes treatment technique, appropriate dose, field design, and the role of prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Ratings and commentary of the panel on multiple treatment parameters were used to reach consensus. Patients with high-risk pathologic features benefit from postprostatectomy radiation therapy.
    Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.) 12/2014; 28(12).
  • Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.) 12/2014; 28(12).
  • Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.) 12/2014; 28(12).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The survival of patients with cancer has improved significantly, primarily because of multidisciplinary care, improved chemotherapeutic agents in both the adjuvant and metastatic settings, the introduction of targeted biologic agents, and the incorporation of palliative care services into the management scheme. However, despite these advances, a significant proportion of patients continue to experience recurrence after adjuvant treatment, and survival associated with stage IV solid tumors still remains low. A primary or acquired resistance to chemotherapeutic and biologic agents is responsible for the failure of many of the agents used to treat patients with a malignancy. This can be explained by the presence of intratumoral heterogeneity and the molecular complexity of many cancers. Factors contributing to intratumoral heterogeneity include genetic mutations, interactions with the microenvironment-and the presence of cancer stem cells. Cancer stem cells have been identified in a number of solid tumors, including breast cancer, brain tumors, lung cancer, colon cancer, and melanoma. Cancer stem cells have the capacity to self-renew, to give rise to progeny that are different from them, and to utilize common signaling pathways. Cancer stem cells may be the source of all the tumor cells present in a malignant tumor, the reason for the resistance to the chemotherapeutic agent used to treat the malignant tumor, and the source of cells that give rise to distant metastases. This review will focus on properties of cancer stem cells; will compare and contrast the cancer stem cell model with the clonal evolution model of tumorigenesis; will discuss the role of cancer stem cells in the development of resistance to chemotherapy; and will review the therapeutic implications and challenges of targeting cancer stem cells, with an assessment of the potential such an approach holds for improving outcomes for patients with cancer.
    Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.) 12/2014; 28(12).
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    ABSTRACT: Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common subtype of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Approximately half of patients will present with advanced (stage III/IV) disease. The cornerstone of treatment is a combination of chemotherapy and immunotherapy, most commonly R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone). Efforts to improve upon R-CHOP-including more chemotherapy cycles, dose-dense chemotherapy, alternative drug combinations, high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell transplant, and maintenance rituximab-have generally proved unsuccessful. There is a growing body of retrospective and prospective data, however, suggesting a benefit for consolidation radiation therapy (RT) in select patients with advanced DLBCL. Consolidation RT has been shown to improve outcomes for patients with advanced DLBCL generally, and in specific instances including initially bulky disease, bone involvement, or in the setting of a partial response to systemic therapy. In these settings consolidation RT is highly efficacious at achieving local disease control and improving overall outcomes.
    Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.) 12/2014; 28(12).
  • Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.) 12/2014; 28(12).