Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.) (ONCOLOGY-NY )

Description

  • Impact factor
    3.19
    Show impact factor history
     
    Impact factor
  • 5-year impact
    2.52
  • Cited half-life
    7.90
  • Immediacy index
    0.49
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.79
  • Website
    Oncology website
  • Other titles
    Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.: Online)
  • ISSN
    0890-9091
  • OCLC
    60628022
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Local therapy (surgery and radiation) is an essential component of breast cancer treatment. Yet, based on clinical trial results dating from the 1980s, the magnitude of local therapy interventions has been decreasing. Now, with the emergence of tailored systemic therapies, their increasing use in the neoadjuvant setting, and their high rates of pathologic complete response (pCR), the relevance of local therapy is being questioned. However, given our present inability to assess pathologic response without surgery, the low pCR rates in common subtypes of breast cancer, and the survival advantages with nodal radiation, local therapy remains not only relevant but crucial to a comprehensive breast cancer treatment plan. In the future, as gene profiling of individual patient tumors progresses and allows for precise tailoring of therapy, it is conceivable that surgery and/or radiation would not be required in some patients. However, the notion that brief, low-morbidity local therapy options, which synergize with prolonged and potentially morbid systemic regimens, would not be relevant for most patients is beyond the horizon at the moment.
    Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.) 11/2014; 28(11).
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    ABSTRACT: The liver is the most common site of metastases from colorectal cancer. Over the past 3 decades, surgical resection has proved to be the most effective and potentially curative therapy for such metastases. This article will review the current practice of hepatic resection for colorectal liver metastases, including the possibility of combined resection of hepatic metastases at the time of resection of the primary cancer. Effective use of neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy has further expanded the pool of treatable patients. Most recently, ablative therapies based on needle-delivered thermoablation or radiation therapy have become additional weapons for effective treatment. The relative roles and combined use of these local therapies will be highlighted in this article. Overall, the recent combined advances in surgery, radiation therapy, ablative therapy, and chemotherapy have provided more patients with a chance for long-term survival.
    Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.) 11/2014; 28(11).
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    ABSTRACT: Men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer have multiple treatment options, and the expanding palate of available therapies renders careful patient selection imperative. Men with visceral (especially hepatic) metastases have a particularly poor prognosis, regardless of the treatment selected. Retrospective analyses of datasets from large phase III randomized trials showed that men with visceral metastases appear to derive clinical benefit from second-generation antiandrogens as well as from docetaxel chemotherapy, but not from immunotherapy. The mechanistic underpinnings of these observations are currently not clear, but could involve factors that are intrinsic to the tumor cell, the tumor microenvironment, and/or systemic factors. Regardless of the underlying mechanism(s), a better understanding of the basic biology of visceral vs bone metastases will be critical in improving prostate cancer treatment in the setting of advanced disease.
    Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.) 11/2014; 28(11).
  • Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.) 11/2014; 28(11).
  • Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.) 11/2014; 28(11).
  • Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.) 11/2014; 28(11).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The completion of the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST), a randomized controlled trial (RCT) of lung cancer screening (LCS), in 2010 provided powerful RCT evidence of the efficacy and safety of computed tomography-based screening; nevertheless, the study had important limitations. Failure to understand these limitations has had substantial adverse effects. Misinterpretation or misrepresentation of the results has led to underestimation of benefits and overestimation of adverse effects. When factored into predictive models, inaccurate estimates have yielded falsely low projections of potential lives saved with national implementation of LCS, exaggerated projected costs, and underestimated cost-effectiveness. When extrapolated estimates were presented to guideline groups and payer panels by screening critics, results included delay in implementation of screening, recommendations to screen only a limited high-risk subgroup, and advice to restrict LCS to otherwise undefined "centers of excellence" able to enter data into a national registry. Finally, despite the formal endorsement of LCS by a large number of prestigious guideline groups, inaccurate extrapolation of NLST data has served to convince payer panels to recommend against insurance coverage for LCS. This article reviews limitations of the NLST study design and compares its results with screening data from many other RCTs and clinical programs, with the intention of providing more accurate and comprehensive information on the benefits, risks, costs, and cost-effectiveness of LCS.
    Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.) 11/2014; 28(11).
  • Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.) 11/2014; 28(11).
  • Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.) 11/2014; 28(11).
  • Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.) 11/2014; 28(11).
  • Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.) 11/2014; 28(11).
  • Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.) 11/2014; 28(11).
  • Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.) 11/2014; 28(11).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Immune checkpoint-blocking drugs such as ipilimumab, pembrolizumab, and nivolumab have demonstrated clinical efficacy as anticancer agents. Through modulation of immunoregulatory molecules, these novel therapeutics can produce durable cancer remissions in a variety of tumor types. As these medications are administered to an increasing number of patients, clinicians must be able to recognize and treat the associated immune-related side effects. This review summarizes the unique mechanisms of toxicity associated with immune checkpoint-blocking drugs, appropriate steps in patient evaluation, and strategies for mitigating risk and optimizing patient outcomes. Although the management of each patient receiving immune checkpoint-blockade therapy must be individualized, a conceptual framework upon which to base a multidisciplinary approach to best practices will help oncology practitioners deliver safe and effective care.
    Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.) 11/2014; 28(11 Suppl 3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Blocking the programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) pathway with monoclonal antibodies has shown promising antitumor responses in clinical trials, with less toxicity than has been seen with prior immune therapies such as interleukin 2 and ipilimumab. Pembrolizumab, an anti-PD-1 antibody, recently gained US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) accelerated approval for the treatment of patients with ipilimumab-refractory melanoma, while nivolumab, another anti-PD-1 antibody, and MPDL3280A, an anti-programmed cell death 1 ligand (PD-L1) antibody, have been granted FDA "breakthrough designation" for treatment of subsets of patients with refractory Hodgkin lymphoma and metastatic bladder cancer, respectively. Encouraging antitumor activity has also been seen with these agents in patients with other malignancies, including non-small-cell lung cancer and head and neck cancer, tumors not previously thought to be immune-responsive. PD-L1 expression has emerged as a potential predictive biomarker for PD-1-directed therapy. Multiple, distinct, companion assays for PD-L1 positivity have been developed, but there is as yet no comparison, standardization, or prospective validation of these assays. PD-L1 expression on tumor cells and/or the tumor-immune infiltrate is likely only part of the predictive model necessary for selecting patients predisposed to respond to monotherapy. Additional predictive biomarkers are necessary to identify patients most likely to benefit from PD-1-based combination therapy, since tumor cell PD-L1 expression appears to have limited predictive value in this setting.
    Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.) 11/2014; 28(11 Suppl 3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Immune checkpoints, such as programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) or its receptor, programmed death 1 (PD-1), appear to be Achilles' heels for multiple tumor types. PD-L1 not only provides immune escape for tumor cells but also turns on the apoptosis switch on activated T cells. Therapies that block this interaction have demonstrated promising clinical activity in several tumor types. In this review, we will discuss the current status of several anti-PD-1 and anti-PD-L1 antibodies in clinical development and their direction for the future.
    Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.) 11/2014; 28(11 Suppl 3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Checkpoint blockade is a transformative therapeutic approach to a broad spectrum of malignancies because it increases the power of antitumor immunity to obtain durable responses. Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) is the prototypical inhibitory checkpoint receptor. Since US Food and Drug Administration approval of the anti-CTLA-4 antibody ipilimumab for use in patients with melanoma, there has been ever-increasing excitement among oncologists about new ways to use this method of releasing the "brakes" on patients' endogenous immune systems. This review will summarize the preclinical and clinical development of CTLA-4-blocking antibodies, discuss recent insights into the biology of CTLA-4 blockade, review the use of these antibodies in combination with established and novel therapeutic modalities, and comment on ongoing questions regarding their administration.
    Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.) 11/2014; 28(11 Suppl 3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Bladder cancer is a unique disease process in that clinically significant hemorrhage can occur simultaneously with equally significant aberrant clotting. With hematuria the key presenting symptom of bladder cancer, hemorrhage is generally thought to be a component of the natural history of the disease, and to commonly occur during its treatment. However, as those who regularly treat bladder cancer know, the need to address a predisposition to clotting is also very much part of the treatment paradigm. Physicians must be cognizant of the biochemical changes that confer a propensity for both significant bleeding and clotting occurring simultaneously in their patients. Both of these entities remain important issues, and further study is needed to find ways to mitigate and balance the associated risks. Here, we performed a review of the literature, focusing on the concomitant issues of bleeding and venous thromboembolism in both the pre- and post-operative periods in patients with bladder cancer. We formulated a general management approach with respect to these two processes, and we provide direction for further investigation.
    Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.) 10/2014; 28(10).
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    ABSTRACT: The management of rectal cancer in patients with metastatic disease at presentation is highly variable. There are no phase III trials addressing therapeutic approaches, and the optimal sequencing of chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and surgery remains unresolved. Although chemoradiation is standard for patients with stage II/III rectal cancer, its role in the metastatic setting is controversial. Omitting chemoradiation may not be appropriate in all stage IV patients, particularly those with symptomatic primary tumors. Moreover, outcomes in this setting are vastly different, as some treatments carry the potential for cure in selected patients, while others are purely palliative. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 3 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application, by the panel, of a well-established consensus methodology (Modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures. In instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used as the basis for recommending imaging or treatment.
    Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.) 10/2014; 28(10).
  • Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.) 10/2014; 28(10).