Clinical laboratory management review: official publication of the Clinical Laboratory Management Association / CLMA (Clin Lab Manag Rev Offic Publ )

Publisher: Clinical Laboratory Management Association

Description

Discontinued in 1999. Continued by Clinical Leadership & Management Review (1527-3954).

  • Impact factor
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  • 5-year impact
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  • Other titles
    Clinical laboratory management review
  • ISSN
    0888-7950
  • OCLC
    13720381
  • Material type
    Periodical
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Communicating is something people take for granted. But some organizations have still not learned that information should not be a closely guarded commodity, but something to be shared freely. To be productive, employees must know the organization's goals and constraints. Managers must develop an early warning system so little problems do not grow into big ones. They must be able to assess their employees' morale and prevent personality problems from getting out of hand. In this issue, we asked some top communicators for their tips on promoting better information exchange.
    Clinical laboratory management review: official publication of the Clinical Laboratory Management Association / CLMA 01/2010; 5(6):503-5.
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    ABSTRACT: This article defines motivation. It tells managers how they can motivate themselves and whether they can motivate others. If managers cannot motivate others, this article explains what they can do instead. It reveals the FOUR essential elements of motivation: direction, importance, faith, and example. And it identifies the THREE most motivational messages managers can send to their staffs: "You are important," "You can do it," and "Follow me!"
    Clinical laboratory management review: official publication of the Clinical Laboratory Management Association / CLMA 04/2005; 13(2):91-9.
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    ABSTRACT: The payoff to successful time management is getting more out of your life and your career. This is accomplished by spending less time with your time robbers and more time on things that really have value to you. To gather data on how time management principles apply to clinical laboratory managers, in-depth surveys were conducted. These interviews produced some interesting findings about typical time robbers of clinical laboratory managers, as well as some innovative solutions. This article focuses on three principles of time management: Principle #1: Do Some Analysis of Your Use of Time. Principle #2: List Goals and Set Priorities. Principle #3: Plan Your Time Regularly.
    Clinical laboratory management review: official publication of the Clinical Laboratory Management Association / CLMA 01/2003; 13(1):13-21.
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    ABSTRACT: In 1998 and 1999, unprecedented changes occurred in the U.S. economy: unemployment rates dropped below 4.5%, the stock market soared to more than 11,000, and about 3 million new technology-related jobs were created (1). Faced with worldwide competition and new technologies, many industries and businesses have had to relook at and reengineer their operations. Human resource management has played a key role. Significant resources always have been allocated to the recruiting process to hire competent and loyal employees. To not spend the time and effort to recruit good employees can be costly in many ways. This review offers guidelines to managers and emphasizes just how important this process is to the success of an organization.
    Clinical laboratory management review: official publication of the Clinical Laboratory Management Association / CLMA 01/1999; 13(5):251-61.
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    ABSTRACT: Managers seeking to develop, retain, and stabilize their workforces will find that this article has basic mentoring skill information that will support their effort. It describes benefits the manager and the organization can derive from the process as well as the more commonly expected benefits to the employee.
    Clinical laboratory management review: official publication of the Clinical Laboratory Management Association / CLMA 01/1999; 13(5):314-6.
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    ABSTRACT: The authors explain two opinions related to sexual harassment that were issued by the U.S. Supreme Court on June 26, 1998. Included is information on steps every employer should take to be certain their anti-harassment policies are up to date.
    Clinical laboratory management review: official publication of the Clinical Laboratory Management Association / CLMA 01/1999; 13(4):213-4.
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    ABSTRACT: This article describes how a competency assessment program can be implemented in a clinical laboratory. The author reviews applicable standards and regulations and describes a 10-step process for establishing a program. Sample forms are provided for documenting assessments.
    Clinical laboratory management review: official publication of the Clinical Laboratory Management Association / CLMA 01/1999; 13(5):275-85.
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    ABSTRACT: This article describes the use of quality systems as a tool for managers of health-care clinical services to establish a common framework across the different disciplines in the continuum of care. Quality systems used internationally in the manufacturing and service sectors are applicable to multidisciplinary clinical systems management because the essential elements of quality are universal. These elements have been redefined into health-care terminology and can be used by clinical systems managers as a basis for implementing a quality system. The structure for documents in a quality system also has been adapted to health care and allows for a common set of quality policies and processes to unify the different clinical services. By using a consistent quality management approach and documentation, managers can transcend technical operational differences and ensure effective clinical integration.
    Clinical laboratory management review: official publication of the Clinical Laboratory Management Association / CLMA 01/1999; 13(4):197-202.
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    ABSTRACT: Presentation skills are vital to clinical systems managers. This article covers four steps to successful presentations: 1) tailoring for an audience, 2) organizing a presentation, 3) mastering presentation techniques, and 4) creating effective visual aids. Tailoring for the audience entails learning about the audience and matching the presentation to their knowledge, educational level, and interests. Techniques to curry favor with an audience include: establishing common ground, relating through universal experiences, and pushing "hot buttons." Tasks involved in organizing the presentation for maximum audience interest begin with arranging the key points in a transparent organizational scheme. Audience attention is sustained using "hooks," such as graphics, anecdotes, humor, and quotations. Basic presentation techniques include appropriate rehearsal, effective eye contact with an audience, and anxiety-reducing strategies. Visual aids include flip charts, slides, transparencies, and computer presentations. Criteria for selecting the type of visual aids are delineated based on audience size and type of presentation, along with respective advantages and disadvantages. The golden rule for presentations is "Never show a slide for which you have to apologize." Rules to maximize visibility and effectiveness, including use of standard templates, sans serif fonts, dark backgrounds with light letters, mixed cases, and effective graphics, ensure that slides or projected computer images are clear and professional. Taken together, these strategies will enhance the delivery of the presentation and decrease the speaker's anxiety.
    Clinical laboratory management review: official publication of the Clinical Laboratory Management Association / CLMA 01/1999; 13(6):372-85.
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    ABSTRACT: Throughout the world, governments and health-care facilities have been under pressure to reduce the costs associated with providing health care. Through the use of workflow analysis, many laboratory administrators have identified cost-saving measures. Consolidating technology (workstations) and reducing personnel have generated significant cost reductions for the laboratory. However, there are parts of the world where it is impossible to displace personnel, for example Spain. This case study, conducted in Catalonia, Spain, demonstrates how laboratory administrators, through the use of workflow analysis, can identify cost-saving measures without reducing laboratory personnel.
    Clinical laboratory management review: official publication of the Clinical Laboratory Management Association / CLMA 01/1999; 13(2):75-80.
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    ABSTRACT: King Arthur had the right idea all along--to get the key stakeholders around a table and address the vital issues. The author describes his concept of a "wisdom circle," a gathering of people who speak candidly and from the heart, listen intently to the wisdom of other people, and honor the wisdom and intelligence we all possess to meet both individual and collective needs.
    Clinical laboratory management review: official publication of the Clinical Laboratory Management Association / CLMA 01/1999; 12(5):401, 400.
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    ABSTRACT: External customers have a choice in the laboratory they use for testing. They will select the one that best meets their needs and expectations. This article identifies 15 key strategies aimed at creating and maintaining a successful outreach program: 1) marketing must be a "top-down" commitment; 2) assess your market; 3) deploy a focused sales team; 4) develop competitive pricing strategies; 5) seek out managed care affiliations; 6) provide timely and appropriate testing services; 7) become a low-cost provider; 8) deploy a sophisticated laboratory information system; 9) develop customer-friendly billing; 10) provide convenient courier services; 11) establish a strategic patient service center network; 12) make it easy to contact you; 13) develop user-friendly requisition forms; 14) let the market know you're there; 15) know where you are headed.
    Clinical laboratory management review: official publication of the Clinical Laboratory Management Association / CLMA 01/1999; 13(4):188-96.
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    ABSTRACT: A review of the literature finds wide variation in the costs and turnaround times associated with central laboratories, satellite laboratories, and point-of-care testing. The greatest variation occurs when comparing options for blood gas and electrolyte testing. Some variation can be attributed to costing methods, but substantial variation arises from circumstances under which testing is undertaken in specific sites. These circumstances include the site-specific costs of resources used in testing, volumes of testing conducted, and performance requirements demanded by the users of laboratory information.
    Clinical laboratory management review: official publication of the Clinical Laboratory Management Association / CLMA 01/1999; 13(4):179-87.
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    ABSTRACT: The need to compete for managed care contracts is causing hospitals and physicians to dramatically change how they do business with each other. Most significant is the formation of integrated delivery health-care systems. The emergence of these systems creates an enhanced need for physicians and administrators to better understand what the other actually does. This article examines the new health-care marketplace from both perspectives and how integrated delivery systems affect individual and community patient care, and it offers guidelines for effective hospital-physician relationships within integrated delivery systems.
    Clinical laboratory management review: official publication of the Clinical Laboratory Management Association / CLMA 01/1999; 13(1):3-12.
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    ABSTRACT: We believe the team approach to laboratory management achieves the best outcomes. Laboratory management requires the integration of medical, technical, and administrative expertise to achieve optimal service, quality, and cost performance. Usually, a management team of two or more individuals must be assembled to achieve all of these critical leadership functions. The individual members of the management team must possess the requisite expertise in clinical medicine, laboratory science, technology management, and administration. They also must work together in a unified and collaborative manner, regardless of where individual team members appear on the organizational chart. The management team members share in executing the entire human resource management life cycle, creating the proper environment to maximize human performance. Above all, the management team provides visionary and credible leadership.
    Clinical laboratory management review: official publication of the Clinical Laboratory Management Association / CLMA 01/1999; 13(5):301-9.
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    ABSTRACT: Nutrition assessment performed as part of hospital admission protocol can significantly reduce length of stay, costs of care, and the incidence of readmission by efficiently identifying patients with malnutrition. As reported in more than 150 clinical studies, malnutrition is a health problem of huge magnitude, potentially affecting more than half of hospitalized patients in the United States. The laboratory director can optimize the use of visceral protein testing in nutrition assessment protocols to realize the greatest benefit for both patient and institution. The accurate identification of patients with protein calorie malnutrition allows the use of malnutrition ICD-9-CM codes to obtain higher reimbursement for the increased acuity of illness.
    Clinical laboratory management review: official publication of the Clinical Laboratory Management Association / CLMA 01/1999; 13(6):357-64.
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    ABSTRACT: Health-care managers have long been sensitive to the importance of physical resources (technology, space) and financial resources to the success of service delivery. During the last several decades, the value and potential for development of a third element, the human resource has gained new recognition. The importance of viewing personnel as an expandable resource, addressed in an organization's strategic plan, is crucial to meet challenges faced in a rapidly changing health-care environment.
    Clinical laboratory management review: official publication of the Clinical Laboratory Management Association / CLMA 01/1999; 13(5):242-50.
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    ABSTRACT: Patient access to health-care services has become an important issue owing to the growth of managed care organizations and the number of patients enrolled. To better understand the current issues related to access to laboratory testing, with a particular focus on the impact of managed care, we gathered information from a network of clinical laboratories in the Pacific Northwest. Two questionnaires were sent to the 257 Laboratory Medicine Sentinel Monitoring Network participants in November 1995 and March 1996 to investigate trends in the availability and utilization of laboratory testing services and changes in onsite testing menus. Although laboratories reported that managed care was a factor in their decisions about laboratory practices, testing decisions were more likely made for business reasons, based on medical practice changes and marketplace influences not associated with managed care.
    Clinical laboratory management review: official publication of the Clinical Laboratory Management Association / CLMA 01/1999; 13(3):137-42.
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    ABSTRACT: Standardizing products, procedures, and processes in clinical departments across multiple sites has significant potential for improving clinical outcomes, enhancing financial savings, and simplifying management processes. This is true whether a network of owned hospitals is working toward a full-scale clinical integration or a group of community hospitals is collaborating to gain cost efficiencies. By developing a functional team and designing a relatively simple program, the results can be very rewarding. The author describes some of the basic principles in designing a standardization program and cites some examples of successful programs as well as listing some pitfalls to be avoided along the way.
    Clinical laboratory management review: official publication of the Clinical Laboratory Management Association / CLMA 01/1998; 12(5):347-52.