Violence and Victims (Violence Vict )

Publisher: University of New Hampshire. Family Research Laboratory, Springer Verlag

Description

Now in its 18th year, the journal of Violence & Victims serves as an exceptional forum for the latest developments in theory, research, policy, clinical practice, and social services in the area of interpersonal violence and victimization, including legal and media reports as well as book reviews.

  • Impact factor
    1.28
  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
    9.70
  • Immediacy index
    0.04
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.00
  • Website
    Violence & Victims website
  • Other titles
    Violence and victims (Online), Violence and victims
  • ISSN
    0886-6708
  • OCLC
    60617173
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Springer Verlag

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Authors own final version only can be archived
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On author's website or institutional repository
    • On funders designated website/repository after 12 months at the funders request or as a result of legal obligation
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set phrase to accompany link to published version (The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com)
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This qualitative study investigated talk and interaction as process factors potentially influencing outcomes in abuser group intervention. The findings showed that (a) abusers participate in group programs with considerably different degrees of motivation; (b) the interaction in abusers' various stages of change is characterized by different qualities; and (c) group counselors face a challenge in adapting their ways of working to abusers' various needs and backgrounds. The findings demonstrate the importance of attending to the interactional elements in abuser treatment programs and show the value of matching an abuser's needs and degree of motivation with the timing of interventions. It is argued that attention to all these matters could help in making abuser programs more effective.
    Violence and Victims 04/2014; 29(2):195-216.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective: To present statistics documenting the scope and the nature of child victimization, polyvictimization, and revictimization and to explore the relationship between victimization in childhood and later revictimization in adulthood. Methods: The sample comprises 975 undergraduates in a cross-sectional, retrospective design. Childhood victimization and lifetime revictimization were assessed using the Traumatic Life Events Questionnaire. Results: 26.59% of participants reported childhood interpersonal victimization and 16.80% reported an interpersonal victimization episode in adulthood. Polyvictimization was reported by 8.30%, whereas 7.50% of the sample suffered child victimization and adult revictimization. Multiple regression showed that child polyvictimization significantly predicted adult revictimization. Conclusions: The results support the idea that polyvictimization in childhood exerts a cumulative effect on interpersonal victimization in adulthood. More importantly, polyvictimization is a key concept to understanding the risk of revictimization, even at low rates.
    Violence and Victims 03/2014; 29(2):217-231.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Despite the vast literature on gender symmetry in the perpetration of domestic assault, few studies have looked specifically at both the female and male victims of violence. Using data from the National Violence Against Women Survey (NVAWS) and building on the work of Johnson and Leone (2005), this study is a comparison of the female and male victims of intimate terrorism (IT) and an examination of the effects of IT on male victims. The findings indicate that IT, as a type of violence, does not have the same characteristics when the victims are men. Men involved in a terroristic marriage are not more likely to be injured, do not miss work more frequently, and are not more likely to report symptoms of depression compared to men involved in situational couple violence (SCV). Other findings appear to point to gender symmetry between women and men regarding IT, although broad conclusions based on these findings cannot be made in the absence of a sufficient means to measure the level of coercion within the relationship. Additional research is needed with more innovative and complete measures of control, the defining characteristic of IT.
    Violence and Victims 01/2014; 29(1):73-88.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study examines the applicability of Agnew's strain theory and Gottfredson and Hirschi's self-control theory in explaining husband-to-wife psychological aggression and physical assault in a community survey of 871 couples in Hong Kong. Three strains, each belonging to 1 type of Agnew's types of strain, were selected, namely, dissatisfaction with family financial situation, dissatisfaction with relationship with spouse, and physical abuse by parents in childhood. Self-control was measured with a simplified version of 12 items selected from the 24-item Self-control Scale developed by Grasmick, Tittle, Bursik, and Ameklev (1993). The conditioning effect of self-control on the relationship between strain and husband-to-wife violence was also examined. Results show that 2 of the 3 types of strain and self-control significantly affected both types of spousal violence. In addition, self-control has a conditioning effect on the relationship between strain and husband-to-wife violence, reducing the likelihood of strain leading to violence. Theoretical and practical implications of the findings are discussed.
    Violence and Victims 01/2014; 29(2):280-99.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We examined relations of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms with dimensions of trauma, including environment (Domestic vs. Community) and proximity (Indirect vs. Direct trauma) among inner-city youth. Participants (n = 65) reported traumatic events they had experienced on a version of the UCLA PTSD Reaction Index Trauma Exposure Screen, and reported PTSD symptoms with the PTSD Checklist--Civilian version (PCL-C). High rates of trauma and PTSD were found, consistent with other reports of inner-city youth. The 49% of youth surveyed met criteria for PTSD on the PCL-C symptom scale with a score cutoff of 35. Females reported elevated PTSD symptom scores and a higher incidence of Domestic trauma than did males but similar incidence of other trauma types. When males and females were combined, Domestic trauma significantly correlated with each of the PTSD symptom clusters of intrusions, numbing/avoidance, and hyperarousal. When participants with Community trauma were excluded from analyses to reduce confounding environmental influence, Domestic trauma marginally correlated with numbing/avoidance symptoms. Our findings suggest that Domestic trauma may result in more emotional numbing/avoidance symptoms than other types of trauma. Further analyses suggested that Community trauma may result in more intrusions and hyperarousal symptoms rather than emotional numbing. Environmental aspects of trauma, rather than the proximity of trauma, may have greater impact on presentation of PTSD. Future studies with larger samples are needed to confirm these findings.
    Violence and Victims 01/2014; 29(2):262-79.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Although physical abuse during pregnancy has been linked to poor birth outcomes, the role of psychological abuse is less well understood. Associations between birth outcomes and types of psychological abuse during pregnancy (being threatened, screamed at, or insulted) were examined in 489 women with no history of physical abuse. Being threatened was significantly associated with adverse birth outcomes, with women reporting any instance during pregnancy twice as likely to deliver a low birth weight baby. These results remained after controlling for background factors. Finally, most of the variance between threats and birth weight was accounted for by mediating health behaviors (specifically prenatal care utilization and pregnancy weight gain), suggesting pathways for the negative effects of being threatened by an intimate partner during pregnancy.
    Violence and Victims 01/2014; 29(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study examined alcohol consumption, internalized homophobia, and outness as related to men's (N = 107) reports of the perpetration of violence against a same-sex partner. Higher typical weekly alcohol consumption, higher levels of internalized homophobia, and less outness (e.g., lower levels of disclosure of one's sexual orientation) predicted the perpetration of partner violence. In contrast to what we expected, the interaction between higher alcohol consumption and higher levels of outness about one's sexual orientation (i.e., being open to friends, family members, work colleagues) increased the likelihood of participants' reports of perpetrating physical violence. These results suggest the importance of both alcohol consumption and sexual minority stressors and their interactions in understanding men's perpetration of same-sex partner violence.
    Violence and Victims 01/2014; 29(5).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: There has been a growing interest amongst researchers and practitioners regarding the various coping strategies adopted by women experiencing intimate partner abuse (IPA). These studies have tended to adopt and adapt the stress-coping model developed by Lazarus and Folkman (1984) and thus make the distinction between emotion and problem-solving coping strategies and the resources available for women to cope. Even though, contemporary coping scholars acknowledge the role of employment and coping, it is still unclear as to how employment facilitates women's coping strategies. Drawing on findings from a qualitative study, this article explores how employment and workplace environments provide survivors of IPA with resources that allow them to cope with the abuse. By incorporating theoretical insights developed in the field of organizational studies, namely boundary work and organizational identities, these findings develop our understanding of the role of employment in survivors' coping strategies. Finally, the findings demonstrate the valuable contribution of interdisciplinarity in furthering our knowledge of coping strategies and the positive aspects of employment for survivors of IPA.
    Violence and Victims 01/2014; 29(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective: Childhood family violence exposure is associated with increased risk for experiencing intimate partner violence (IPV) in adulthood, but the mechanisms underlying this relationship remain inadequately understood. Difficulties with emotion regulation may be one factor that helps to explain this relationship. Method: Childhood physical abuse and interparental violence, as well as subsequent IPV experiences, were assessed in a large sample of young adults (N = 670). Several indicators of anger-related dysregulation were also assessed. Structural equation modeling was used to create a latent variable of anger-related dysregulation, which was examined as a potential mediator of the associations between childhood family violence exposure and IPV. Results: Childhood physical abuse and interparental violence were associated with greater physical, sexual, and emotional IPV victimization. Childhood physical abuse and interparental violence were also associated with anger-related dysregulation, which was positively associated with all three types of IPV experiences. Anger-related dysregulation fully mediated the association between witnessing interparental violence and physical IPV. Anger-related dysregulation partially mediated the association between witnessing interparental violence and psychological IPV and the associations of childhood physical abuse with all three forms of IPV. These associations were consistent across gender. Conclusions: Interventions aimed at reducing IPV risk among survivors of childhood family violence may benefit from including techniques to target anger-related emotion regulation skills.
    Violence and Victims 01/2014; 29(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Annually, over a thousand children are the victims of homicide in the United States Homicide among younger children, 0–9 years of age, is usually perpetrated by parents and caregivers. Researchers neither have tracked changes in the homicide rate among young children over time nor have they used theory to understand what factors may drive these changes. In this analysis of state-level data, we used longitudinal growth modeling and ecological theory to examine changes in homicide rate against children aged 0–9 years from 1979 to 2007. Our results indicate that states are relatively consistent, over time, in their homicide rates. Furthermore, a cultural context of criminal and risky behavior is positively associated with homicide against children. We discuss implications for future research and prevention.
    Violence and Victims 01/2014; 29(5).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background: Sexual assault disproportionately affects college students. Because most survivors do not report sexual assault, research has explored individual factors related to the reporting, with limited research exploring institutional-level factors related to victims' decisions to report their experiences. Objective: The purpose of this research was to describe three key areas: (a) campus assault adjudication, (b) protocols and campus responses to assault, and (c) provision of student prevention education regarding sexual violence. Participants: A nationally representative sample of 1,067 campus administrators responded to a survey regarding institutional sexual assault policies and procedures. Conclusions: Findings suggest that although many institutions are responding adequately to sexual assault in these three areas, improvements are possible. Implications for improving campus responses and further research are discussed.
    Violence and Victims 01/2014; 29(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In Finland, as many as 20 people have lost their lives in two school shootings within one year. This article describes trauma-theoretical rationale, planning, and implementation of acute and long-term psychosocial aftercare that was organized in Kauhajoki where one of the school shootings happened. The aftercare was embedded in the school community's everyday life to enhance easy access. The aftercare proceeded in 6 phases, involving the immediate support phase at the first 24 hr, the acute phase for the first 2 weeks, followed by a 5-month period of empowerment, normalization, and creating “a safe place.” The habituation phase coincided with the completion of the renovation of the damaged school building and students returning to the scene. The first anniversary was marked by shared rituals and remembrance, and the follow-up phase lasted until the end of the aftercare in 2 years. The aftercare contained, for example, psychoeducation, screening, and services at community, group, and individual levels.
    Violence and Victims 01/2014; 29(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Although standards for batterer intervention programs (BIPs) have been adopted in nearly all U.S. states, there is no evidence that standards are implemented and no information about challenges programs may encounter in efforts to comply with standards. This study uses qualitative survey data from BIPs in the state of Oregon (N = 42) to identify barriers to implementation during a 2-year period following the introduction of state standards. Nine challenges were identified including difficulty finding qualified facilitators, inadequate funding, difficulty meeting training requirements, high workloads, trouble creating and maintaining collaborations, inability to accommodate diverse participant needs, conflict between state standards and county requirements, and perceived gaps between standards and evidence-based practices. These findings inform controversy surrounding BIP standards and efforts to increase BIP effectiveness.
    Violence and Victims 01/2014; 29(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Covictims of homicide are the loved ones of people killed by homicide. As secondary victims, they experience trauma from the crime yet are not the focus of criminal justice system (CJS) processes. The current descriptive-exploratory study seeks to better understand this often hidden population by exploring the relationship between CJS case status, trauma symptoms, life satisfaction, and coping with a group of 137 covictims from the Mid-South region of the United States. Findings indicate that case closure does not resolve trauma symptoms, although symptoms do lessen. In addition, a broad range of helping services and coping strategies are used after the homicide. Some are associated with CJS case status, trauma symptoms, and life satisfaction whereas others are not. These findings highlight important areas for future research.
    Violence and Victims 01/2014; 29(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Research relevant to coping with grief for African American family members of homicide victims is limited. This retrospective study was conducted to determine the effects of gender, length of time since death, the traumatic impact of experiencing the homicide of a loved one, and the use of coping strategies to current grief reactions of African American family members of homicide victims (N = 44). Multiple regression analysis results suggest that gender and level of traumatic stress, related to posttraumatic stress symptomatology, predict current symptoms of grief. Women reported higher levels of current grief symptoms than men. Family members of homicide victims who reported higher levels of posttraumatic stress symptomology reported higher levels of current grief. Implications for research and recommendations for practitioners are discussed.
    Violence and Victims 01/2014; 29(2):332-47.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Although the crime of homicide has received significant attention from scholars, little research exists that examines the impact of homicide on surviving family members. Because opportunities for victims and family members of victims to participate in the criminal justice system are increasing, it is important to understand the impact of these forms of participation on those who choose to participate. This study uses data from focus groups to examine the experiences of homicide survivors within the criminal justice system, including views about how system involvement and specific outcomes (i.e., sentencing) may help or hinder healing. Findings suggest that many families leave the criminal justice system feeling marginalized and revictimized. This study calls into question the current criminal justice system's ability to meet the needs of crime victim and their families.
    Violence and Victims 01/2014; 29(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to examine predictors of psychological and physical dating violence perpetrated by 126 pregnant and parenting Latina adolescents. We found 85.7% had perpetrated at least one act of psychological abuse and 47.6% had perpetrated at least one act of physical abuse against the father of their child in the past 3 months. When examining predictors of psychological dating violence, we found that Latina adolescents who engaged in less positive communication patterns with their parents as well as those who were both the victim and perpetrator of physical abuse within their dating relationships were more likely to perpetrate psychological abuse. When examining predictors of physical dating violence, we found that Latina adolescents who perpetrated psychological abuse against the father of their child were also more likely to perpetrate physical abuse.
    Violence and Victims 01/2014; 29(5).