Violence and Victims (Violence Vict )

Publisher: University of New Hampshire. Family Research Laboratory, Springer Verlag

Description

Now in its 18th year, the journal of Violence & Victims serves as an exceptional forum for the latest developments in theory, research, policy, clinical practice, and social services in the area of interpersonal violence and victimization, including legal and media reports as well as book reviews.

Impact factor 1.28

  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
    9.70
  • Immediacy index
    0.04
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.00
  • Website
    Violence & Victims website
  • Other titles
    Violence and victims (Online), Violence and victims
  • ISSN
    0886-6708
  • OCLC
    60617173
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Springer Verlag

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Author's pre-print on pre-print servers such as arXiv.org
    • Author's post-print on author's personal website immediately
    • Author's post-print on any open access repository after 12 months after publication
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set phrase to accompany link to published version (see policy)
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: As Jamaica moves through implementation of their National Policy on Gender Equality and develops harassment legislation, this article attempts to investigate current levels and trends of gender-based violence in Jamaica. All analyses make use of existing data and data formats in developing performance indicators that illustrate the current state of gender violence in Jamaica. The analyses provide a baseline for the future assessment and comparison with internationally accepted gender-based violence indicators. All source data has been included to facilitate comparisons and discussions regarding related levels and trends of violence as well as addressing performance indicator effectiveness.
    Violence and Victims 12/2014; 29(6):1047-1076.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article investigates gender differences in trauma symptoms from baseline to end of treatment (trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy or parent–child interaction therapy) in children ages 7–18 years. Multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) and trend analysis using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) were conducted on baseline and end of treatment University of California at Los Angeles Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Reaction Index (UCLA PTSD-RI) total scores. Results suggest that female children start at higher reported total posttraumatic stress disorder rates than males, but both groups experience significant symptom reduction during the course of treatment. At posttreatment, girls are still reporting higher symptom levels on the UCLA PTSD-RI than boys, suggesting that their clinical presentation at discharge may differ despite significant treatment gains. A full factorial model including the interaction of dose and gender was not significant. Identification of these gender-specific response patterns are an important consideration in treatment and discharge planning for children who have been trauma-exposed and are presenting for treatment with post trauma exposure disturbances.
    Violence and Victims 12/2014; 29(6).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The need for prevention of children's exposure to family aggression is clear, yet studies have not examined effects of family based programs on both partner and parent–child aggression. This study examined moderated effects of an 8-session psychoeducational program for couples on partner psychological aggression and parent–child physical aggression when the child was 3 years old. A community sample of 169 expectant couples was randomized to intervention and control conditions. Significant program effects indicated reduced partner psychological aggression by fathers and reduced parent–child physical aggression by mothers for couples with frequent preprogram partner psychological aggression and reduced partner psychological aggression by fathers for couples with severe preprogram partner physical aggression. Efforts to prevent children's exposure to family aggression may most benefit couples exhibiting preprogram relationship risk.
    Violence and Victims 12/2014; 29(6).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Research supports a relationship between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetration, and theory implicates emotion regulation and anger management skills as probable moderators to that relationship (Chemtob, Novaco, Hamada, Gross, & Smith, 1997). However, no study has investigated these interactive relationships with female-perpetrated physical IPV. Therefore, this study examined the interactive effects of PTSD symptoms, emotion regulation, and anger management skills on female-perpetrated physical IPV. Female community members (N = 254) completed measures of PTSD symptoms, emotion regulation strategies, anger management skills during partner conflict, and IPV perpetration. Results indicated two-way interaction effects between emotion regulation and both PTSD symptoms and negative partner attributions. In addition, PTSD symptoms, emotion regulation, and escalating strategies marginally interacted to predict female-perpetrated IPV. Implications of these results for future research and interventions are discussed.
    Violence and Victims 12/2014; 29(6).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In this study, survival analysis is used to examine time to rearrest for both domestic violence and nondomestic violence crimes among a cohort of domestic violence offenders (N = 286) over a 10-year period. In addition, risk factors for rearrest such as demographic, offending history, and batterer treatment variables are examined to determine their influence on domestic and nondomestic violence recidivism. Overall, the results suggest that approximately half of domestic violence offenders are rearrested. Furthermore, among those who are rearrested, they are rearrested fairly quickly and for generalized (both domestic and nondomestic violence offenses) versus specialized offending. Risk factors associated with both types of rearrest included age, marriage, and domestic violence offense history. Several additional risk factors were unique to rearrest type. Study limitations are explicitly stated and policy implications are discussed.
    Violence and Victims 12/2014; 29(6).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Little is known about the perceived perpetration of female-to-male intimate partner violence by victims of male offenders mandated to treatment. Sixty-eight male perpetrators of partner violence completed measures of dyadic violent and aggressive responding at intake and at a 12-week follow-up. Approximately 20% of male offenders reported partner violence perpetration and 30% reported victimization with bidirectional violence as the most common configuration of couple violence. Maladaptive responses to conflict were prevalent across partners. Significant and highly correlated reductions in aversive behaviors were detected across the assessment period for both males and their female partners. Results are interpreted within the context of motivational models of female-to-male partner violence and current treatment approaches.
    Violence and Victims 12/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: There has been a growing interest amongst researchers and practitioners regarding the various coping strategies adopted by women experiencing intimate partner abuse (IPA). These studies have tended to adopt and adapt the stress-coping model developed by Lazarus and Folkman (1984) and thus make the distinction between emotion and problem-solving coping strategies and the resources available for women to cope. Even though, contemporary coping scholars acknowledge the role of employment and coping, it is still unclear as to how employment facilitates women's coping strategies. Drawing on findings from a qualitative study, this article explores how employment and workplace environments provide survivors of IPA with resources that allow them to cope with the abuse. By incorporating theoretical insights developed in the field of organizational studies, namely boundary work and organizational identities, these findings develop our understanding of the role of employment in survivors' coping strategies. Finally, the findings demonstrate the valuable contribution of interdisciplinarity in furthering our knowledge of coping strategies and the positive aspects of employment for survivors of IPA.
    Violence and Victims 08/2014; 29(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The cycle of violence thesis posits that early exposure to maltreatment increases the likelihood of later maladaptive and antisocial behaviors. Childhood sexual abuse (CSA) specifically has been shown to increase the likelihood of sexual offending, although less is known about its linkages to other forms of crime. Based on data from 2,520 incarcerated male juvenile offenders from a large southern state, hierarchical logistic regression models suggested that CSA increased the likelihood of later sexual offending nearly sixfold (467% increase). However, CSA was associated with an 83% reduced likelihood of homicide offending and 68% reduced likelihood of serious person/property offending. These findings suggest further support for the cycle of violence where CSA promotes sexual offending but novel findings regarding the linkages between CSA and other forms of crime.
    Violence and Victims 08/2014; 29(4).
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    ABSTRACT: This study followed 125 7th-grade students in Taiwan for the entire school year and analyzed the individual and social network factors predicting their involvement in physical bullying over 5 waves of data. Using self-reports of bullying experiences, 20 classroomlevel networks of bullying and friendship were constructed for 4 classrooms and 5 temporal points, from which 4 individual-level network measures were calculated. They included bully and victim centrality, popularity, and embeddedness in friendship networks. A series of mixed models for repeated measures were constructed to predict students' bully and victim centrality in bullying network at time t + 1. Compared to girls, boys were more likely to be both the bullies and victims. Lower self-esteem and higher family economic status contributed to victim centrality. Having parents married and living together predicted lower bully centrality. Higher educational level of parents predicted lower victim and bully centrality. Regarding the social network factors, students' bully centrality at t positively predicted their bully centrality at t + 1, whereas victim centrality predicted their subsequent victim centrality. Interaction effects between friendship network and bullying network were observed. Embeddedness in friendship network reduced victim centrality at t + 1 except for those students with low victim centrality at t. For those with high victim centrality at t, popularity increased their risk of physical victimization over time. Implications for research and practice are discussed.
    Violence and Victims 08/2014; 29(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: One-third of sexual assault cases that are reported to the police involve adolescent victims (Snyder, 2000), yet little is known about adolescent victims' interactions with law enforcement. Through semistructured interviews with 20 adolescent sexual assault victims, this study sought to understand—from the perspectives of the adolescents—how the police interacted with them on an interpersonal level and the impact this had on the adolescents' emotional well-being and engagement in the criminal justice system. Findings revealed that when the police engaged in behaviors that the victims perceived as caring, compassionate, and personable (vs. behaviors that were perceived as uncaring, insensitive, and intimidating), there was a positive impact on victims' emotional well-being and criminal justice system engagement. Implications for improving adolescents' help-seeking experiences are discussed.
    Violence and Victims 08/2014; 29(4).
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    ABSTRACT: This study was planned to assess the psychometric properties of the Turkish version of the “attitudes and practices of health care providers regarding intimate partner violence” (APHCPs-IPV) survey scale. The sample consisted of 355 primary health care providers. A Likert-type scale composed of eight subfactors, and 43 items were used. Means and standard deviations were calculated for interval-level data. A p value of less than .05 was considered statistically significant. The Turkish version consisted of eight factor groups. The Cronbach's alpha of the general scale was .66, and the Cronbach's alpha of the factor groups ranged from .29 to .81. It was determined that the APHCPs-IPV scale was a valid and reliable scale to be used in Turkish society, on the condition that item number 33 be removed.
    Violence and Victims 08/2014; 29(4).
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    ABSTRACT: Intimate partner violence has been recognized as a major problem on college campuses and is a source of concern for researchers, clinicians, policymakers, and the general population. Most research has focused on the intergenerational transmission of violence and identifying the intrapersonal mechanisms that enable violence in the family of origin to carry over to adult intimate relationships. This study expands the current literature by examining insecure attachment styles and destructive disagreement beliefs as mediators in the relationship between exposure to hostility or aggression in the family of origin and later experiences of dating aggression. Research questions were addressed with a sample of 1,136 college undergraduates (59% women). In all models, results of structural equation modeling indicated that an insecure attachment style and destructive disagreement beliefs mediated the intergenerational transmission of violence among both men and women. These findings have important implications for future research as well as relationship education programs and preventative interventions.
    Violence and Victims 08/2014; 29(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Intimate partner violence (IPV) makes a substantial contribution to the burden of disease in South Africa. This article explores the current quality of care for IPV in public sector primary care facilities within the Western Cape. Only 10% of women attending primary care, while suffering from IPV, were recognized. Case studies, based on in-depth interviews and medical records, were used to reflect on the quality of care received among the women who were recognized. Care tended to be superficial, fragmented, poorly coordinated, and lacking in continuity. The recognition, management, and appropriate documentation of IPV should be prioritized within the training of primary care providers. It may be necessary to appoint IPV champions within primary care to ensure comprehensive care for survivors of IPV.
    Violence and Victims 08/2014; 29(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Although standards for batterer intervention programs (BIPs) have been adopted in nearly all U.S. states, there is no evidence that standards are implemented and no information about challenges programs may encounter in efforts to comply with standards. This study uses qualitative survey data from BIPs in the state of Oregon (N = 42) to identify barriers to implementation during a 2-year period following the introduction of state standards. Nine challenges were identified including difficulty finding qualified facilitators, inadequate funding, difficulty meeting training requirements, high workloads, trouble creating and maintaining collaborations, inability to accommodate diverse participant needs, conflict between state standards and county requirements, and perceived gaps between standards and evidence-based practices. These findings inform controversy surrounding BIP standards and efforts to increase BIP effectiveness.
    Violence and Victims 08/2014; 29(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Some authors have proposed that the mechanisms underlying adolescent-to-parent abuse seem to be different from other forms of juvenile delinquency. Given that this aggression is exerted within the family setting, our study was aimed to explore if there was a differential family profile for those adolescents who commit a parent abuse offense compared to those who commit other types of offenses. Judicial files of 1,046 young offenders from the Juvenile Justice Service of Jaén (Spain) were examined. The final sample (654 young offenders) was divided into 2 groups: those who had committed offenses against a parent (parent abuse group) and those who had committed other types of offenses (other offenses group). Results showed that families with parent abuse have differential characteristics, especially regarding the family size, type of household, parenting styles, and the patterns of interactions between the family members.
    Violence and Victims 06/2014; 29(3).