East African journal of public health (East Afr J Publ Health )

Publisher: East African Public Health Association

Description

The East African Journal of Public Health is a multi-disciplinary journal publishing scientific research work from a range of public health related disciplines including community medicine, epidemiology, nutrition, behavioural sciences, health promotion, health education, communicable and non-communicable disease. The journal also engages in, and responds to, current scientific and policy debates, including methodological issues in public health research.

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  • 5-year impact
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  • Website
    East African Journal of Public Health website
  • Other titles
    East African journal of public health (Online), EAJPH
  • ISSN
    0856-8960
  • OCLC
    163567082
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background: Employed women tend to practice breastfeeding less than non-employed women. However, little is known about working mothers’ views, experiences and barriers of breastfeeding practice from employment perspective. The objective of this study was to examine knowledge, attitude and practice about optimal breastfeeding and associated factors among working mothers in northern Ethiopia. Methods: Cross-sectional study was carried out in July 2009. A total of 306 women were randomly selected and interviewed. Information regarding participants' demographics, biomedical and employment factors, and practice were collected. The analyses were done using binary logistic regression adjusted for potential confounders. Results: The extent of knowledge and attitude towards breastfeeding was 70% and 75%, respectively. Exclusive breastfeeding for 6 months among employee mothers’ was 46%. Optimal breastfeeding practice among employees’ was only 35.6%. The logistic regression analysis showed that lower educational status of the mother (aOR = 0.25 ,95% CI = 0.07, 0.86) , lower household income (aOR=7.21,95%CI =1.42,36.56), little work experience (aOR = 0.38, 95%CI =0.21,0.69], cesarean delivery (aOR= 0.41,95% CI = 0.20,0.84), postnatal care visit (aOR =1.99, 95% CI = 1.13 ,3.51) and having good knowledge (aOR=6.98,95%CI= 3.68,13.24) were independently associated with optimal breastfeeding practice. Conclusion: Working mothers had good knowledge and favorable attitude towards breastfeeding, but the optimal practice was low. Income, education, work experience, mode of delivery, postnatal visit, and knowledge are significant determinants of optimal breastfeeding practice. Promotion of breastfeeding at work place is needed to increase the rate of full breastfeeding. Keywords: breastfeeding, employment, knowledge, attitude, practice
    East African journal of public health 09/2014; 11(1):704-715.
  • East African journal of public health 04/2014; 8(15).
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Prematurity, birth asphyxia and infections are the leading causes of neonatal mortality globally. This study was conducted to determine the mortality and associated factors among premature neonates at Bugando Medical Centre, Mwanza-Tanzania. Methods: One hundred and three premature neonates delivered at Bugando Medical Centre and other health facilities but referred to Bugando Medical Centre (BMC) were recruited for this study between February and May, 2012. Questionnaires were used to obtain clinical and demographic data from neonates and their mothers. Neonates were followed up for seven days to determine complications and mortality. Results: Neonatal mortality within seven days of life was noted to be 39.4% (39/99).At least one episode of hypothermia was noted in 43/99 (43.4%), 37/99 (37.4%) hadrespiratory distress syndrome and 32/99 (32.3%) had infection. Significantly higher mortality was noted in neonates born to younger mothers (p=0.02) and those with primary education level (p< 0.047). Mortality was significantly lower for twin neonates (p=0.001) and those delivered by caesarean section (p=0.013).Among the independent predictors of mortality noted in this study were extremely low birth weight (ELBW)[OR 24; 95% CI 4.6-125.8 (p < 0.01)] and presence of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) [OR 31.5; 95% CI 6.5-152.6 (p < 0.001)]. Conclusions: High mortality was noted among premature neonates in the first week of life. Maternal age, extremely low-birth weight and presence of RDS were noted to be predicators of mortality.
    East African journal of public health 01/2014; 11(1).
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    ABSTRACT: Open Access Subscription or Fee Access Evaluation of oral health among pregnant women in a Nigerian population AO Afolabi, MA Adedigba, VT Adekanmbi Abstract Objective: This study evaluates the oral health knowledge and practise among pregnant women in a Nigerian population. Consecutive pregnant women attending three tertiary level of care were recruited. An interviewer administered questionnaire was used to assessing socio-demographic variables, dental visiting habits, oral hygiene habits and oral health awareness. Results Four hundred and eighty participated in this study out of which 263 (54.8%) had low oral health knowledge and had never visited dentist before 362 (75.4%). The odds of having high oral hygiene knowledge increased by about 2 folds when the respondent is older than 35 years compared to less than 20 years. Also, the likelihood of having high oral hygiene knowledge increased by 127% if the respondents had oral disease compared to those without oral disease. Presence of gum swelling has 3 folds increase on oral hygiene knowledge than those without it. Dental visit has the odd of increasing oral hygiene knowledge by 5 folds compared with non visiting. Also, the likelihood of practising high oral hygiene reduced by 82% if the respondent visited dentist when had complaint compared to those who had visited dentist only once. Respondents who had been advised by a dentist on oral hygiene before were 146% more likely to have high oral hygiene in pregnancy when compared with those who had not been advised before. Conclusion: The oral health knowledge of the pregnant women was very low. Hence, a special dental program should be designed to meet the needs of the pregnant women. Key words: Pregnant women oral knowledge and practise Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Objective: This study evaluates the oral health knowledge and practise among pregnant women in a Nigerian population. Consecutive pregnant women attending three tertiary level of care were recruited. An interviewer administered questionnaire was used to assessing socio-demographic variables, dental visiting habits, oral hygiene habits and oral health awareness. Results Four hundred and eighty participated in this study out of which 263 (54.8%) had low oral health knowledge and had never visited dentist before 362 (75.4%). The odds of having high oral hygiene knowledge increased by about 2 folds when the respondent is older than 35 years compared to less than 20 years. Also, the likelihood of having high oral hygiene knowledge increased by 127% if the respondents had oral disease compared to those without oral disease. Presence of gum swelling has 3 folds increase on oral hygiene knowledge than those without it. Dental visit has the odd of increasing oral hygiene knowledge by 5 folds compared with non visiting. Also, the likelihood of practising high oral hygiene reduced by 82% if the respondent visited dentist when had complaint compared to those who had visited dentist only once. Respondents who had been advised by a dentist on oral hygiene before were 146% more likely to have high oral hygiene in pregnancy when compared with those who had not been advised before. Conclusion: The oral health knowledge of the pregnant women was very low. Hence, a special dental program should be designed to meet the needs of the pregnant women. Key words: Pregnant women oral knowledge and practise
    East African journal of public health 01/2014; 11(1):630-640.
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To assess women’s satisfaction with health facility delivery care services and to determine the factors associated with satisfaction. Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted in 12 primary health facilities in Lindi and Mtwara rural districts. All women who gave birth in the facilities during the time of the study were interviewed using a pretested structured questionnaire. The questionnaire contained 29 items on likert scale including different aspects of delivery care service. Women were considered to be satisfied if they reported satisfaction to at least half of the items assessed. Results: Total of 504 women were interviewed. Overall a large proportion (80%) reported to be satisfied with the delivery care services. Proportion satisfied varied in different aspects of care ranging from 30% reporting to be satisfied with management of labour pains to 96% reporting to be satisfied with care of the newborn. Only age of the mother showed significant association with satisfaction. Women with formal education and those delivering for the first time were satisfied compared to their counterparts although the difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion and recommendations: Majority of women reported satisfaction with delivery services but there were significant variations across different care items. High levels of dissatisfaction were on aspects of provider client communication, labour pain management and drugs availability issues. Training of health providers on communication skills and ensuring availability of drugs should be prioritized. Allowing a companion during labour may be considered since it has been proven to make women comfortable and satisfied with the process of delivery elsewhere. Key words: delivery care services, satisfaction, factors influencing satisfaction, Tanzania
    East African journal of public health 01/2014; 11(1):738-746.
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    ABSTRACT: The growing need for disaster management skills at all levels in Eastern Africa requires innovative approaches to training planners at all levels. While information technology tools provide a viable option, few studies have assessed the capacity for training institutions to use technology for cascading disaster management skills.
    East African journal of public health 06/2013; 10(2):403-9.
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    ABSTRACT: The Eastern Africa region is a hot-spot for epidemics of emerging zoonotic diseases ('epizoonotics'). However, the region's capacity for response to epidemics of zoonotic origin has not been documented. This paper presents a multi-country situational analysis on the institutional frameworks for management of zoonotic epidemics in the Eastern Africa region.
    East African journal of public health 06/2013; 10(2):387-96.
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    ABSTRACT: Most countries in sub-Saharan Africa have not conducted a disaster risk analysis. Hazards and vulnerability analyses provide vital information that can be used for development of risk reduction and disaster response plans. The purpose of this study was to rank disaster hazards for Uganda, as a basis for identifying the priority hazards to guide disaster management planning.
    East African journal of public health 06/2013; 10(2):380-6.
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    ABSTRACT: Aim: The goal of this study was to identify the achievements and challenges of a resource allocation process in a decentralized health system in Tanzania as they are perceived by national and district level officers. Methodology: This study was conducted between May 2011 and July 2012 in two districts of Dodoma region: Kongwa and Bahi. Data were collected from 25 key people involved in policy, planning and management aspects for the allocation of financial resources from the central government to local government districts. Thus, the recruitment of the study participants was purposive, as it took account of their positions and experience in health resource allocation and management. The data were collected through conversation in face-to-face in-depth interviews with the officers concerned. The data were analysed manually using qualitative content analysis. Results: The study has identified the achievements and challenges of resource allocation in a decentralized health system of Tanzania. The achievements include: the design and use of a needs-based resource allocation formula; reduced resource allocation inequalities between rural and urban districts; and a wide discretion by the district council to mobilize and utilize health insurance funds and user fees. On the other hand, the challenges are: the disbursed funds fall far short of centrally determined budget ceilings, and the funds are sent late; Council Health Management Teams (CHMT) develop budgets but are restricted on the percentage they can allocate to different areas – so there is severe under-funding of disease prevention and health promotion initiatives at the community level. Conclusion: This study has identified achievements that should be further nurtured and challenges that should be worked on for the improvement of the decentralized health system. Thus, as a way forward, it is recommended that the equitable allocation of resources should go beyond the recurrent costs for the delivery of health services.
    East African journal of public health 06/2013; 9(2):416-427.
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract: Aim: The goal of this study was to identify the achievements and challenges of a resource allocation process in a decentralized health system in Tanzania as they are perceived by national and district level officers. Methodology: This study was conducted between May 2011 and July 2012 in two districts of Dodoma region: Kongwa and Bahi. Data were collected from 25 key people involved in policy, planning and management aspects for the allocation of financial resources from the central government to local government districts. Thus, the recruitment of the study participants was purposive, as it took account of their positions and experience in health resource allocation and management. The data were collected through conversation in face-to-face in-depth interviews with the officers concerned. The data were analysed manually using qualitative content analysis. Results: The study has identified the achievements and challenges of resource allocation in a decentralized health system of Tanzania. The achievements include: the design and use of a needs-based resource allocation formula; reduced resource allocation inequalities between rural and urban districts; and a wide discretion by the district council to mobilize and utilize health insurance funds and user fees. On the other hand, the challenges are: the disbursed funds fall far short of centrally determined budget ceilings, and the funds are sent late; Council Health Management Teams (CHMT) develop budgets but are restricted on the percentage they can allocate to different areas – so there is severe under-funding of disease prevention and health promotion initiatives at the community level. Conclusion: This study has identified achievements that should be further nurtured and challenges that should be worked on for the improvement of the decentralized health system. Thus, as a way forward, it is recommended that the equitable allocation of resources should go beyond the recurrent costs for the delivery of health services
    East African journal of public health 06/2013; Volume 9(Number 2):417-427.
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    ABSTRACT: Rwanda has been experiencing quite a significant number of disastrous events of both natural and man-made origin in the last 2 decades. Many cases of disasters are particularly linked to the geographic, historical and socio-cultural aspects of the country. The overall objective of the present article is to perform a situation analysis of disasters in Rwanda and to highlight the institutional and legal framework of disaster management.
    East African journal of public health 06/2013; 10(2):428-38.
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    ABSTRACT: Although Uganda is a high burden country for epidemics of infectious diseases, the pattern of epidemics has not yet been adequately documented. The purpose of this study was to describe the distribution, magnitude and characteristics of recent epidemics in Uganda, as a basis for informing policy on priorities for targeted prevention of epidemics.
    East African journal of public health 06/2013; 10(2):397-402.
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    ABSTRACT: This paper describes a situationanalysis on hazards in the Arid and semi-Arid lands of Kenya. The leading hazards affecting the Arid and semi-arid lands are mainly natural and include among others drought, floods, and landslides. Other hazards of importance were found to be war and conflict, HIV/AIDS and fires. Over 80% of these are weather related.
    East African journal of public health 06/2013; 10(2):410-5.
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    ABSTRACT: Sub-Saharan Africa is vulnerable to several natural and man-made disasters. We used the CDC Automated Disaster and Emergency Planning Tool (ADEPT) to develop all-hazards disaster management plans at district level in three eastern African countries.
    East African journal of public health 06/2013; 10(2):439-46.
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    ABSTRACT: Sixty percent of the global deaths and injuries occur in the developing world and mostly are due to Road traffic accidents (RTAs. looking at the etiological related factors which include, carelessness of the driver, condition of the vehicle or motorcycle, poor condition of roads, risky behavior of the driver, most of these factors can be prevented to some extent. This study therefore, determined the pattern of cases and deaths due to traffic road accidents in Mwanza City Tanzania.
    East African journal of public health 06/2013; 10(2):487-92.
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    ABSTRACT: Uganda is vulnerable to several natural, man-made and a hybrid of disasters including drought, famine, floods, warfare, and disease outbreaks. We assessed the district disaster team's performance, roles and experiences following the training.
    East African journal of public health 06/2013; 10(2):459-68.
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    ABSTRACT: There is insufficient documentation of the institutional frameworks for disaster management and resilience at different levels in sub-Saharan Africa. The objective of this study was to describe the institutional framework for disaster management in Uganda, and to identify actionable gaps at the different levels.
    East African journal of public health 06/2013; 10(2):469-75.