East African journal of public health (East Afr J Publ Health)

Publisher: East African Public Health Association

Journal description

The East African Journal of Public Health is a multi-disciplinary journal publishing scientific research work from a range of public health related disciplines including community medicine, epidemiology, nutrition, behavioural sciences, health promotion, health education, communicable and non-communicable disease. The journal also engages in, and responds to, current scientific and policy debates, including methodological issues in public health research.

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Website East African Journal of Public Health website
Other titles East African journal of public health (Online), EAJPH
ISSN 0856-8960
OCLC 163567082
Material type Document, Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective: Hygiene and sanitation in Tanzania is one of the areas suffering from chronic neglect. Sanitation and hygiene is still low on the agenda of political platforms and receives a low priority among the community members and public sector. Competing priorities such as education and health (especially curative) contribute significantly in making sanitation and hygiene an area of low priority from the household to the national levels. Local government authorities have been implementing various interventions pertaining to improvement of sanitation and hygiene practices but they have not achieved the results to the expectation of the community. The study aimed at exploring the barriers facing local governance in the implementation of sanitation and hygiene promotion services and recommends possible solutions to overcoming them. Methods: A qualitative research method was employed whereby in-depth interviews were used to obtain information from 16 Key Informants. All interviews were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim and content analytical approach was employed to analyze the data. Findings: Results from this study identified several major barriers facing the implementation of sanitation and hygiene promotion services at the local government authorities. These include fragmented coordination; unclear roles and responsibilities; weak collaboration with stakeholders to scale up promotion; low participation in planning processes among stakeholders and inadequate financial and human resources. Conclusion: The study concludes that there are a number of barriers that hinder an effective implementation of sanitation and hygiene services in the district. The local authorities should put in place good local governance mechanism that is capable of integrating well the sanitation and hygiene services to the local development activities.
    East African journal of public health 12/2014; Volume 11(Number 4):878-888.
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Background: The application of insecticides targeted at vector mosquitoes through Indoor Residual Spraying has been adopted as one of the most effective ways of reducing the burden of malaria. However, key to the success of such a strategy is baseline information about local vector population and their profiles to any of the chemicals applied. This paper presents baseline resistance and susceptibility profiles of mosquitoes collected from 5 districts in Ghana earmarked for Indoor Residual Spraying. Methods: We collected mosquitoes using hand-held aspirators and determined their susceptibility to the four classes of insecticides approved by the WHO for IRS. We further used morphological identification tools to identify the species of the mosquitoes collected. Results: Out of the total of 5500 mosquitoes collected, 5113 (93.0%) and 387 (7.0%) belonged to the Anopheles gambiae and An. funestus complexes respectively. Overall, mosquitoes collected showed susceptibilities ranging from 97-100% to the Organophosphates and the Carbamates (94.3-100%) but were highly resistant to the Organochlorides (32.2-57.8%) and Pyrethroids (27.7-72.3%). Conclusion: Our data clearly highlights the importance of prior knowledge of local mosquito populations to any of the recommended classes of insecticides before IRS is incorporated as part of any intended or existing malaria vector control strategy.
    East African journal of public health 12/2014; 11:4.
  • East African journal of public health 04/2014; 8(15).
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To assess women’s satisfaction with health facility delivery care services and to determine the factors associated with satisfaction. Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted in 12 primary health facilities in Lindi and Mtwara rural districts. All women who gave birth in the facilities during the time of the study were interviewed using a pretested structured questionnaire. The questionnaire contained 29 items on likert scale including different aspects of delivery care service. Women were considered to be satisfied if they reported satisfaction to at least half of the items assessed. Results: Total of 504 women were interviewed. Overall a large proportion (80%) reported to be satisfied with the delivery care services. Proportion satisfied varied in different aspects of care ranging from 30% reporting to be satisfied with management of labour pains to 96% reporting to be satisfied with care of the newborn. Only age of the mother showed significant association with satisfaction. Women with formal education and those delivering for the first time were satisfied compared to their counterparts although the difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion and recommendations: Majority of women reported satisfaction with delivery services but there were significant variations across different care items. High levels of dissatisfaction were on aspects of provider client communication, labour pain management and drugs availability issues. Training of health providers on communication skills and ensuring availability of drugs should be prioritized. Allowing a companion during labour may be considered since it has been proven to make women comfortable and satisfied with the process of delivery elsewhere. Key words: delivery care services, satisfaction, factors influencing satisfaction, Tanzania
    East African journal of public health 01/2014; 11(1):738-746.
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    ABSTRACT: Open Access Subscription or Fee Access Evaluation of oral health among pregnant women in a Nigerian population AO Afolabi, MA Adedigba, VT Adekanmbi Abstract Objective: This study evaluates the oral health knowledge and practise among pregnant women in a Nigerian population. Consecutive pregnant women attending three tertiary level of care were recruited. An interviewer administered questionnaire was used to assessing socio-demographic variables, dental visiting habits, oral hygiene habits and oral health awareness. Results Four hundred and eighty participated in this study out of which 263 (54.8%) had low oral health knowledge and had never visited dentist before 362 (75.4%). The odds of having high oral hygiene knowledge increased by about 2 folds when the respondent is older than 35 years compared to less than 20 years. Also, the likelihood of having high oral hygiene knowledge increased by 127% if the respondents had oral disease compared to those without oral disease. Presence of gum swelling has 3 folds increase on oral hygiene knowledge than those without it. Dental visit has the odd of increasing oral hygiene knowledge by 5 folds compared with non visiting. Also, the likelihood of practising high oral hygiene reduced by 82% if the respondent visited dentist when had complaint compared to those who had visited dentist only once. Respondents who had been advised by a dentist on oral hygiene before were 146% more likely to have high oral hygiene in pregnancy when compared with those who had not been advised before. Conclusion: The oral health knowledge of the pregnant women was very low. Hence, a special dental program should be designed to meet the needs of the pregnant women. Key words: Pregnant women oral knowledge and practise Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Objective: This study evaluates the oral health knowledge and practise among pregnant women in a Nigerian population. Consecutive pregnant women attending three tertiary level of care were recruited. An interviewer administered questionnaire was used to assessing socio-demographic variables, dental visiting habits, oral hygiene habits and oral health awareness. Results Four hundred and eighty participated in this study out of which 263 (54.8%) had low oral health knowledge and had never visited dentist before 362 (75.4%). The odds of having high oral hygiene knowledge increased by about 2 folds when the respondent is older than 35 years compared to less than 20 years. Also, the likelihood of having high oral hygiene knowledge increased by 127% if the respondents had oral disease compared to those without oral disease. Presence of gum swelling has 3 folds increase on oral hygiene knowledge than those without it. Dental visit has the odd of increasing oral hygiene knowledge by 5 folds compared with non visiting. Also, the likelihood of practising high oral hygiene reduced by 82% if the respondent visited dentist when had complaint compared to those who had visited dentist only once. Respondents who had been advised by a dentist on oral hygiene before were 146% more likely to have high oral hygiene in pregnancy when compared with those who had not been advised before. Conclusion: The oral health knowledge of the pregnant women was very low. Hence, a special dental program should be designed to meet the needs of the pregnant women. Key words: Pregnant women oral knowledge and practise
    East African journal of public health 01/2014; 11(1):630-640.
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract: Aim: The goal of this study was to identify the achievements and challenges of a resource allocation process in a decentralized health system in Tanzania as they are perceived by national and district level officers. Methodology: This study was conducted between May 2011 and July 2012 in two districts of Dodoma region: Kongwa and Bahi. Data were collected from 25 key people involved in policy, planning and management aspects for the allocation of financial resources from the central government to local government districts. Thus, the recruitment of the study participants was purposive, as it took account of their positions and experience in health resource allocation and management. The data were collected through conversation in face-to-face in-depth interviews with the officers concerned. The data were analysed manually using qualitative content analysis. Results: The study has identified the achievements and challenges of resource allocation in a decentralized health system of Tanzania. The achievements include: the design and use of a needs-based resource allocation formula; reduced resource allocation inequalities between rural and urban districts; and a wide discretion by the district council to mobilize and utilize health insurance funds and user fees. On the other hand, the challenges are: the disbursed funds fall far short of centrally determined budget ceilings, and the funds are sent late; Council Health Management Teams (CHMT) develop budgets but are restricted on the percentage they can allocate to different areas – so there is severe under-funding of disease prevention and health promotion initiatives at the community level. Conclusion: This study has identified achievements that should be further nurtured and challenges that should be worked on for the improvement of the decentralized health system. Thus, as a way forward, it is recommended that the equitable allocation of resources should go beyond the recurrent costs for the delivery of health services
    East African journal of public health 06/2013; Volume 9(Number 2):417-427.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Aim: The goal of this study was to identify the achievements and challenges of a resource allocation process in a decentralized health system in Tanzania as they are perceived by national and district level officers. Methodology: This study was conducted between May 2011 and July 2012 in two districts of Dodoma region: Kongwa and Bahi. Data were collected from 25 key people involved in policy, planning and management aspects for the allocation of financial resources from the central government to local government districts. Thus, the recruitment of the study participants was purposive, as it took account of their positions and experience in health resource allocation and management. The data were collected through conversation in face-to-face in-depth interviews with the officers concerned. The data were analysed manually using qualitative content analysis. Results: The study has identified the achievements and challenges of resource allocation in a decentralized health system of Tanzania. The achievements include: the design and use of a needs-based resource allocation formula; reduced resource allocation inequalities between rural and urban districts; and a wide discretion by the district council to mobilize and utilize health insurance funds and user fees. On the other hand, the challenges are: the disbursed funds fall far short of centrally determined budget ceilings, and the funds are sent late; Council Health Management Teams (CHMT) develop budgets but are restricted on the percentage they can allocate to different areas – so there is severe under-funding of disease prevention and health promotion initiatives at the community level. Conclusion: This study has identified achievements that should be further nurtured and challenges that should be worked on for the improvement of the decentralized health system. Thus, as a way forward, it is recommended that the equitable allocation of resources should go beyond the recurrent costs for the delivery of health services.
    East African journal of public health 06/2013; 9(2):416-427.
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    ABSTRACT: The Eastern Africa region is a hot-spot for epidemics of emerging zoonotic diseases ('epizoonotics'). However, the region's capacity for response to epidemics of zoonotic origin has not been documented. This paper presents a multi-country situational analysis on the institutional frameworks for management of zoonotic epidemics in the Eastern Africa region.
    East African journal of public health 06/2013; 10(2):387-96.
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    ABSTRACT: Most countries in sub-Saharan Africa have not conducted a disaster risk analysis. Hazards and vulnerability analyses provide vital information that can be used for development of risk reduction and disaster response plans. The purpose of this study was to rank disaster hazards for Uganda, as a basis for identifying the priority hazards to guide disaster management planning.
    East African journal of public health 06/2013; 10(2):380-6.
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    ABSTRACT: The growing need for disaster management skills at all levels in Eastern Africa requires innovative approaches to training planners at all levels. While information technology tools provide a viable option, few studies have assessed the capacity for training institutions to use technology for cascading disaster management skills.
    East African journal of public health 06/2013; 10(2):403-9.
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    ABSTRACT: The Eastern Africa region is regularly affected by a variety of disasters ranging from drought, to human conflict and population displacement. The magnitude of emergencies and response capacities is similar across the region. In order to strengthen public health disaster management capacities at the operational level in six countries of the Eastern Africa region, the USAID-funded leadership project worked through the HEALTH Alliance, a network of seven schools of public health from six countries in the region to train district-level teams.
    East African journal of public health 06/2013; 10(2):447-58.
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    ABSTRACT: Rwanda has been experiencing quite a significant number of disastrous events of both natural and man-made origin in the last 2 decades. Many cases of disasters are particularly linked to the geographic, historical and socio-cultural aspects of the country. The overall objective of the present article is to perform a situation analysis of disasters in Rwanda and to highlight the institutional and legal framework of disaster management.
    East African journal of public health 06/2013; 10(2):428-38.
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    ABSTRACT: Although Uganda is a high burden country for epidemics of infectious diseases, the pattern of epidemics has not yet been adequately documented. The purpose of this study was to describe the distribution, magnitude and characteristics of recent epidemics in Uganda, as a basis for informing policy on priorities for targeted prevention of epidemics.
    East African journal of public health 06/2013; 10(2):397-402.