Journal of biomolecular structure & dynamics (J BIOMOL STRUCT DYN )

Description

The Journal of Biomolecular Structure and Dynamics cordially welcomes manuscripts from active investigators in biological structure, dynamics, interactions and expression. The Journal will cover both experimental and theoretical investigations in the area of nucleic acids, nucleotides, proteins, peptides, membranes, polysaccharides and all their components, metal complexes and model systems. The Journal publishes original articles, communications a la express and timely reviews.

  • Impact factor
    4.99
    Show impact factor history
     
    Impact factor
  • 5-year impact
    1.15
  • Cited half-life
    0.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.25
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.32
  • Website
    Journal of Biomolecular Structure & Dynamics website
  • Other titles
    Journal of biomolecular structure & dynamics, Journal of biomolecular structure and dynamics
  • ISSN
    0739-1102
  • OCLC
    9688706
  • Material type
    Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: -1 programmed ribosomal frameshifting (PRF) in viruses is often stimulated by a pseudoknot downstream from the slippery sequence. At the PRF junction of HIV-1, transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV), Barmah Forest virus (BFV), Fort Morgan virus (FMV), and Equine arteritis virus (EAV), we identified potential double pseudoknots in either a tandem mode or embedded mode. In viruses with tandem pseudoknots (5'PK & 3'PK), the slippery sequence is encompassed in the 5'PK. The ribosome needs to unwind the 5'PK to get to the slippery sequence. In HIV-1, the 3'PK and several alternative structures are mutually exclusive. Disruption of the tandem pseudoknots may enable one of the alternative structures to form as the effective frameshift stimulator. In TGEV/BFV/FMV, the 3'PK is a conventional frameshift stimulator. In all cases, the tandem pseudoknots may slow down the ribosome before it reaches the conventional PRF signals. In EAV, a compact pseudoknot is embedded within loop2 of the otherwise conventional frameshift-stimulating pseudoknot. All double pseudoknots have the potential to stack their stems coaxially. We built structural models of the HIV-1 and EAV double pseudoknots to show that both the tandem and embedded modes are feasible and reasonable. We hypothesize that the fundamental reason for the viruses to utilize coaxially stacked double pseudoknots is to increase the overall stability of the frameshift regulating structure, and avoid an ultra-stable single pseudoknot which may become a ribosomal roadblock. Our results significantly expand the repertoire of RNA structures and dynamics that may potentially involve in -1 PRF regulation.
    Journal of biomolecular structure & dynamics 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The precise prediction of splice junctions as 'exon-intron' or 'intron-exon' boundaries in a given DNA sequence is an important task in Bioinformatics. The main challenge is to determine the splice sites in the coding region. Due to the intrinsic complexity and the uncertainty in gene sequence, the adoption of data mining methods is increasingly becoming popular. There are various methods developed on different strategies in this direction. This article focuses on the construction of new hybrid machine learning ensembles that solve the splice junction task more effectively. A novel supervised feature reduction technique is developed using entropy-based fuzzy rough set theory optimized by greedy hill-climbing algorithm. The average prediction accuracy achieved is above 98% with 95% confidence interval. The performance of the proposed methods is evaluated using various metrics to establish the statistical significance of the results. The experiments are conducted using various schemes with human DNA sequence data. The obtained results are highly promising as compared with the state-of-the-art approaches in literature.
    Journal of biomolecular structure & dynamics 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Haemocyanin is an important non-specific immune protein present in the hemolymph of invertebrates, which have the ability to recognize the microbial pathogens and trigger the innate immune system. In this study, we isolated and purified the haemocyanin using gel filtration chromatography and investigated its microbial recognition mechanism against the invading pathogens. Kuruma shrimp Marsupenaeus japonicus haemocyanin showed the single band with a molecular weight of 76 kDa on SDS-PAGE and its molecular mass was analysed through the MALDI. Pathogen recognition mechanism of M. japonicus haemocyanin was detected through bacterial agglutination, agglutination inhibition and prophenoloxidase activity. M. japonicus haemocyanin agglutinate all human blood RBC types and showed the bacterial agglutination against all tested Gram positive Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis and Bacillus subtilis and Gram negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus vulgaris and Vibrio parahaemolyticus at the concentrations ranging from 30 to 50 μg/ml. Agglutination was inhibited by 50-200 mM of N-acetylneuraminic acid, a-D-glucose, D-galactose and D-xylose. Our results suggest that, 76 kDa subunit of M. japonicus haemocyanin recognize the pathogenic surface proteins which are present on the outer membrane of the bacteria and mediates the bacterial agglutination through haemocytes. This bacterial agglutination was visualized through Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM). This present study would be helpful to explore the importance of haemocyanin in innate immune response of M. japonicus and its eliciting pathogen recognition mechanism leads to the development of innate immunity in crustaceans.
    Journal of biomolecular structure & dynamics 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Telomere holds special mechanism for solving end repair problems and maintaining genomic stability. Protection of telomeres 1 (POT1) which belongs to shelterin family is identified as a key protein that recruits telomerase by interacting with telomere repeat binding factors (TRB1-3). Since, deciphering the mechanism through which POT assembles telomerase is of great interest, computational approaches have been undertaken to understand the mechanism in a well- developed model system - Arabidopsis thaliana. As a first step, an untraditional approach was mediated to locate the active site residues on modeled AtPOT1b protein by interaction studies using molecular docking. To keep in trend with the recent developments, peptide construction and validation was promoted as the next step via molecular dynamics simulation studies. Finally, the validated peptides based on propensity score was evaluated for its efficacy as a potent inhibitor for POT and TRB1-3 interactions. The best peptide, namely, (1-2-d) out of 30 designed peptides, was proved to be vital inhibitor by weakening the interacting complexes.
    Journal of biomolecular structure & dynamics 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Antifreeze proteins or ice-binding proteins (IBPs) facilitate the survival of certain cellular organisms in freezing environment by inhibiting the growth of ice crystals in solution. Present study identifies orthologs of the IBP of Colwellia sp. SLW05, which were obtained from a wide range of taxa. Phylogenetic analysis on the basis of conserved regions (predicted as the 'ice-binding domain' [IBD]) present in all the orthologs, separates the bacterial and archaeal orthologs from that of the eukaryotes'. Correspondence analysis pointed out that the bacterial and archaeal IBDs have relatively higher average hydrophobicity than the eukaryotic members. IBDs belonging to bacterial as well as archaeal AFPs contain comparatively more strands, and therefore are revealed to be under higher evolutionary selection pressure. Molecular docking studies prove that the ice crystals form more stable complex with the bacterial as well as archaeal proteins than the eukaryotic orthologs. Analysis of the docked structures have traced out the ice-binding sites (IBSs) in all the orthologs which continue to facilitate ice-binding activity even after getting mutated with respect to the well-studied IBSs of Typhula ishikariensis and notably, all these mutations performing ice-binding using 'anchored clathrate mechanism' have been found to prefer polar and hydrophilic amino acids. Horizontal gene transfer studies point toward a strong selection pressure favoring independent evolution of the IBPs in some polar organisms including prokaryotes as well as eukaryotes because these proteins facilitate the polar organisms to acclimatize to the adversities in their niche, thus safeguarding their existence.
    Journal of biomolecular structure & dynamics 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Snake venom metalloproteinase (SVMP) (Echis coloratus (Carpet viper) is a multifunctional enzyme that is involved in producing several of the symptoms that follow a snakebite, such as severe local hemorrhage, nervous system effects, tissue necrosis, etc. Because the three dimensional structure of SVMP is not known, models were constructed, and the best model was selected based on its stereo-chemical quality. The stability of the modeled protein was analyzed through molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies. Structure-based virtual screening was performed, and fifteen potential molecules with the highest binding energies were selected. Further analysis was carried out with induced fit docking (IFD), Prime/MM-GBSA (ΔGBind calculations), quantum polarized ligand docking (QPLD) and density functional theory calculations (DFT). Further, the stability of the lead molecules in the SVMP active site was examined using MD simulation. The results showed that the selected lead molecules were highly stable in the active site of SVMP. Hence, these molecules could potentially be selective inhibitors of SVMP. These lead molecules can be experimentally validated, and their backbone structural scaffold could serve as building blocks in designing drug-like molecules for snake anti-venom.
    Journal of biomolecular structure & dynamics 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Recently developed latest version of the sequence-directed single-base resolution nucleosome mapping reveals existence of strong nucleosomes (SNs) and chromatin columnar structures (columns). Broad application of this simple technique for further studies of chromatin and chromosome structure requires some basic understanding as to how it works and what information it affords. The paper provides such an introduction to the method. The oscillating maps of singular nucleosomes, of short and long oligonucleosome columns are explained, as well as maps of chromatin on satellite DNA and occurrences of counter-phase (anti-parallel) nucleosome neighbors.
    Journal of biomolecular structure & dynamics 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: TAX1BP1 is a pleiotropic multi-domain protein involved in many important biological processes such as signal transduction, cell growth and apoptosis, transcriptional coactivation, membrane trafficking, neurotransmission and autophagy. The N-terminus of TAX1BP1 contains a SKICH domain implicated in autophagy. SKICH domains are also present in four other proteins including NDP52, CALCOCO1, SKIP and PIPP. The SKICH domains of SKIP and PIPP mediate plasma membrane localisation. The functions of the SKICH domains of NDP52 and CALCOCO1 are not known. Here we report the crystal structure of the TAX1BP1 SKICH domain, which has an Ig-like fold similar to the NDP52 SKICH domain. Extensive pairwise and clustered aromatic π-stacking interactions are present in the TAX1BP1 SKICH domain. The aromatic residues mediating these interactions can be classified into four groups with varying degrees of conservation among different protein families. The interactions mediated by highly conserved residues are found in the interior and one outward face of the Ig-like β-barrel, representing common structural features of the SKICH domains. Three TAX1BP1-specific pairwise interactions locate in the loop regions, each augmented by a proline-aromatic interaction. The three proline-aromatic clusters are linked together by more generic hydrophobic interactions, forming a unique hydrophobic surface at one end of the TAX1BP1 SKICH domain. The structures and homologous models of SKICH domains from different proteins reveal substantial differences in electrostatic surface properties of the domains. Together with existing biochemical data, results from the structural study suggest that an intact SKICH domain is required for the autophagy function of TAX1BP1.
    Journal of biomolecular structure & dynamics 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Lipopolysaccharide and β-1,3 glucan-binding protein (LGBP) is a family of pattern-recognition transmembrane proteins (PRPs) which plays a vital role in the immune mechanism of crustaceans in adverse conditions. Fenneropenaeus indicus LGBP-deduced amino acid has conserved potential recognition motif for β-1,3 linkages of polysaccharides and putative RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) cell adhesion sites for the activation of innate defense mechanism. In order to understand the stimulating activity of β-1,3 glucan (β-glucan) and its interaction with LGBP, a 3D model of LGBP is generated. Molecular docking is performed with this model, and the results indicate Arg71 with strong hydrogen bond from RGD domain of LGBP. Moreover, from the docking studies, we also suggest that Arg34, Lys68, Val135, and Ala146 in LGBP are important amino acid residues in binding as they have strong bonding interaction in the active site of LGBP. In our in vitro studies, yeast agglutination results suggest that shrimp F. indicus LGBP possesses sugar binding and recognition sites in its structure, which is responsible for agglutination reaction. Our results were synchronized with the already reported evidence both in vivo and in vitro experiments. This investigation may be valuable for further experimental investigation in the synthesis of novel immunomodulator.
    Journal of biomolecular structure & dynamics 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Structural information over the entire course of binding interactions based on the analyses of energy landscapes is described, which provides a framework to understand the events involved during biomolecular recognition. Conformational dynamics of malectin's exquisite selectivity for diglucosylated N-glycan (Dig-N-glycan), a highly flexible oligosaccharide comprising of numerous dihedral torsion angles, are described as an example. For this purpose, a novel approach based on hierarchical sampling for acquiring metastable molecular conformations constituting low-energy minima for understanding the structural features involved in a biologic recognition is proposed. For this purpose, four variants of principal component analysis were employed recursively in both Cartesian space and dihedral angles space that are characterized by free energy landscapes to select the most stable conformational substates. Subsequently, k-means clustering algorithm was implemented for geometric separation of the major native state to acquire a final ensemble of metastable conformers. A comparison of malectin complexes was then performed to characterize their conformational properties. Analyses of stereochemical metrics and other concerted binding events revealed surface complementarity, cooperative and bidentate hydrogen bonds, water-mediated hydrogen bonds, carbohydrate-aromatic interactions including CH-π and stacking interactions involved in this recognition. Additionally, a striking structural transition from loop to β-strands in malectin CRD upon specific binding to Dig-N-glycan is observed. The interplay of the above-mentioned binding events in malectin and Dig-N-glycan supports an extended conformational selection model as the underlying binding mechanism.
    Journal of biomolecular structure & dynamics 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) constitute a new class of nano-structured materials that have vast applications in CNT purification and separation, biosensing, drug delivery, etc. Hybrids formed from the functionalization of CNT with biological molecules have shown interesting properties and have attracted great attention in recent years. Of particular interest is the hybridization of single or double stranded nucleic acid (NA) with CNT. Nucleobases, as the building blocks of NA, interact with CNT and contribute strongly to the stability of the NA-CNT hybrids and their properties. In this work, we present a thorough review of previous studies on the binding of nucleobases with graphene and CNT, with a focus on the simulation works that attempted to evaluate the structure and strength of binding. Discrepancies among these works are identified, and factors that might contribute to such discrepancies are discussed.
    Journal of biomolecular structure & dynamics 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Type IV PHA synthase is a key enzyme responsible for catalyzing the formation of non-toxic, biocompatible, and biodegradable short-chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoates (scl-PHA) under the growth-limiting conditions in the members of the genus Bacillus. Results: The comparative in vitro and in silico analysis of the phaC subunit of type IV PHA synthases among Bacillus cereus FA11, B. cereus FC11, and B. cereus FS1 was done in our study to determine its structural and functional properties. Conserved domain analysis demonstrated that phaC subunit belongs to the alpha/beta (α/β) hydrolase fold. The catalytic triad comprising of cysteine (Cys), histidine (His), and aspartate (Asp) was found to be present at the active site. A shorter inter-atomic distance was found between the carboxyl (-COO) group of Asp and amino (NH2) group of His. Furthermore, slightly long inter-atomic distances between sulfhydryl (SH) group of Cys and NH2 group of His may be pointing toward the broader substrate specificity of type IV PHA synthases. However, a shorter distance between the SH group of Cys and NH2 group of His in case of B. cereus FC11 leads to a higher enzymatic activity and maximum PHA yield (49.26%). Conclusion: The in silico study verifies that the close proximity between SH group of Cys and NH2 group of His in phaC subunit of type IV PHA synthases can be crucial for synthesis of scl-PHA. However, the catalytic activity of type IV PHA synthases declines as the distance between the sulfur (S) atom of the SH group of Cys and the nitrogen (N) atom of NH2 group of His increases.
    Journal of biomolecular structure & dynamics 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Little is known about the process of sex determination at the molecular level in species belonging to the subclass Acari, a taxon of arachnids that contains mites and ticks. The recent sequencing of the transcriptome and genome of the western orchard predatory mite Metaseiulus occidentalis allows investigation of molecular mechanisms underlying the biological processes of sex determination in this predator of phytophagous pest mites. We identified four doublesex-and-mab-3-related transcription factor (dmrt) genes, one transformer-2 gene, one intersex gene, and two fruitless-like genes in M. occidentalis. Phylogenetic analyses were conducted to infer the molecular relationships to sequences from species of arthropods, including insects, crustaceans, acarines, and a centipede, using available genomic data. Comparative analyses revealed high sequence identity within functional domains and confirmed that the architecture for certain sex-determination genes is conserved in arthropods. This study provides a framework for identifying potential target genes that could be implicated in the process of sex determination in M. occidentalis and provides insight into the conservation and change of the molecular components of sex determination in arthropods.
    Journal of biomolecular structure & dynamics 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Liposomal cytarabine, DepoCyt, is a chemotherapy agent which is used in cancer treatment. This form of cytarabine has more efficacy and fewer side effects relative to the other forms. Since DepoCyt contains the cytarabine encapsulated within phosphatidylcholine and the sterol molecules, we modeled dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC)/cholesterol bilayer membrane as a carrier for cytarabine to study drug-bilayer interactions. For this purpose, we performed a series of united-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for 25 ns to investigate the interactions between cytarabine and cholesterol-containing DOPC lipid bilayers. Only the uncharged form of cytarabine molecule was investigated. In this study, different levels of the cholesterol content (0, 20, and 40%) were used. MD simulations allowed us to determine dynamical and structural properties of the bilayer membrane and to estimate the preferred location and orientation of the cytarabine molecule inside the bilayer membrane. Properties such as membrane thickness, area per lipid, diffusion coefficient, mass density, bilayer packing, order parameters, and intermolecular interactions were examined. The results show that by increasing the cholesterol concentration in the lipid bilayers, the bilayer thickness increases and area per lipid decreases. Moreover, in accordance with the experiments, our calculations show that cholesterol molecules have ordering effect on the hydrocarbon acyl chains. Furthermore, the cytarabine molecule preferentially occupies the polar region of the lipid head groups to form specific interactions (hydrogen bonds). Our results fully support the experimental data. Our finding about drug-bilayer interaction is crucial for the liposomal drug design.
    Journal of biomolecular structure & dynamics 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Prion is a misfolded protein found in mammals that causes infectious diseases of the nervous system in humans and animals. Prion diseases are invariably fatal and highly infectious neurodegenerative diseases that affect a wide variety of mammalian species such as sheep and goats, cattle, deer, elk and humans etc. Recent studies have shown that rabbits have a low susceptibility to be infected by prion diseases with respect to other animals including humans. The present study employs molecular dynamics (MD) means to unravel the mechanism of rabbit prion proteins (RaPrPC) based on the recently available rabbit NMR structures (of the wild-type and its two mutants of two surface residues). The electrostatic charge distributions on the protein surface are the focus when analysing the MD trajectories. It is found that we can conclude that surface electrostatic charge distributions indeed contribute to the structural stability of wild-type RaPrPC; this may be useful for the medicinal treatment of prion diseases.
    Journal of biomolecular structure & dynamics 07/2014;

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