Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal (Child Adolesc Soc Work J )

Publisher: Springer Verlag

Description

Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal features original articles that focus on clinical social work practice with children adolescents and their families. The journal addresses current issues in the field of social work drawn from theory direct practice research and social policy as well as focuses on problems affecting specific populations in special settings.

  • Impact factor
    0.00
  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
    0.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.00
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
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  • Website
    Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal website
  • Other titles
    Child & adolescent social work journal, C & A, C and A, Child and adolescent social work
  • ISSN
    0738-0151
  • OCLC
    9495904
  • Material type
    Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

Springer Verlag

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Author's pre-print on pre-print servers such as arXiv.org
    • Author's post-print on author's personal website immediately
    • Author's post-print on any open access repository after 12 months after publication
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set phrase to accompany link to published version (see policy)
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The homicide of a loved one is a devastating event for families. Adult and youth survivors struggle with posttraumatic stress, complicated grief, isolation, and stigma. Existing programs serving survivors of homicide victims offer needed services, but a comprehensive program is lacking. Based on an analysis of existing programs in the United States, a literature review, and the authors’ practice experience, this paper presents a comprehensive, conceptual practice model for supporting survivors of homicide victims. The program model consists of the following components: Counseling/Therapeutic Services; Case Management Services; Advocacy Services; Education/Training; Community of Survivors; and a Website/Hotline. Implications for social work practice and directions for future research are discussed.
    Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal 12/2014;
  • Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Voices and Visions of Youth in Transition, a longitudinal transformative youth-centered research study, examines the experiences and thoughts of youth as they transition out of foster care at the ages of 17, 19, and 21. Qualitative and quantitative survey inquiries were used to attain an understanding of the experiences of 198 youth in foster care who were 17 years old during the first wave of data collection. Nine critical areas related to the transition out of foster care were examined: education; employment; housing; high-risk behavior; access to health insurance; social connections with adults, family, and friends; the transition plan; transition concerns; and personal goals. The majority of youth reported the importance of resources, social support, and personal habits and skills as they prepare for the transition out of foster care. Youth also expressed concerns about being on their own without adequate support and not being able to make it on their own. This article highlights the study’s findings from the first wave of data collection and how youth in transition are meaningfully engaged and empowered throughout the research process.
    Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: With a sample of 10,298 individuals who participated in three waves of interviews from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health conducted between 1994 and 2002, this study examines how exposure to community violence during adolescence could affect individual’s subsequent engagement in civic activities during their young adulthood. Exposure to violence in the community during adolescence decreased the likelihood for a young adult to participate in volunteering for community services. A positive parent–child relationship would promote the likelihood for individual’s civic engagement during young adulthood but there was no significant buffering effect from such relationship against the negative influence from violence exposure on young adults’ civic engagement. Implications for practice and future research are discussed.
    Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The connections between early maltreatment and later aggression are well established in the literature, however gaps remain in our understanding of developmental processes. This study investigates the cascading life course linkages between victimization experiences from childhood through early adulthood and later aggressive behavior. The diverse, at-risk sample is of particular importance to child and adolescent specialists, as it represents highly vulnerable youth accessible through conventional school settings. In addition to direct pathways from proximal life periods, path analysis revealed significant indirect mediated pathways through which earlier life victimization contributes to aggressive behaviors in later life periods as well as revictimization. Multivariate regressions support theorized cumulative effects of multi-form victimization as well as distinct contributions of victimization domains (emotional, witnessing, physical, property, and sexual) in explaining aggressive behavior. Consistent with theorizing about the developmental impact of early maltreatment, results bolster the importance of interrupting pathways from victimization to revictimization and later aggression. Findings are evaluated in light of implications for early identification and prevention programming.
    Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Spirituality has been identified in the literature as a protective mechanism for promoting hope among African American adolescents. However, few studies have examined the perceptions of hope and spirituality from the viewpoint of African American adolescents. This study explores the perceptions of hope and spirituality among low-income African American adolescents through photovoice methodology and in-depth interviews. Sixteen (n = 16) African American adolescents of ages 13–17 participated in this study. Results of the study broaden the construct of hope to include spirituality as a source of protection in dangerous environments. Implications are made for social workers and other professionals working with African American adolescents and their families.
    Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: This exploratory study represents one of the preliminary phases in a larger study conducted in efforts to develop the Domestic Minor Sex Trafficking (DMST) Risk and Resiliency Assessment. The purpose of this study was to examine the factors that may put youth at risk for DMST. Because of Social Works ethical responsibility to marginalized populations, the promotion of protective factors through a 10-session group intervention to counteract against such risks was also explored. Thus, over a three-month period, 10 psychoeducational group interventions were facilitated with 23 runaway, homeless, and street youth (RHSY) at an urban drop-in center with the primary goals of: (a) increasing awareness of healthy versus unhealthy relationship patterns, (b) increasing knowledge on how to set healthy relationship boundaries, (c) increasing the desire and expectation of mental, physical, and sexual respect, and (d) assisting in safe exits from abusive and/or exploitive relationships. Results of the pre-test post-test design indicate a myriad of risk factors for DMST. Findings also support that when provided a psychoeducational intervention within a safe, encouraging, and youth friendly environment, RHSY are able to define and develop protective factors against sex trafficking. Implications are relevant to practitioners and researchers in the field.
    Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal 12/2014; 31(6).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Australia’s research and knowledge base on cultural competency has been slow to develop. To help address this gap, the New South Wales (NSW) Department of Family and Community Services (FaCS) funded a large scale study in this area, which included a detailed literature review. The paper reports on key findings from that review including that collectivist values are at odds with ‘child-centred’ philosophies of child protection; there is an inherent tension between the right to equal protection from harm and the right for respect in cultural differences in parenting and family functioning (‘cultural absolutism’ versus ‘cultural relativism’); there are factors that uniquely characterise ‘the migrant context’ (especially lack of awareness of child protection laws and systems, economic disadvantage, and fear of authority); and that cultural competency is separable from cultural awareness and cultural sensitivity, and also different from addressing language barriers. However, in reviewing the literature it became apparent that the specific roles and responsibilities of workers, agencies, and systems were not clearly delineated. Thus this paper also aimed to address this unmet need. Identifying their unique roles and responsibilities can help ensure that the delivery of child protection services are efficiently and effectively mobilised from both the ‘top’ and ‘bottom’ to benefit all ethnic minority families. Moreover, any implementation of cultural competency needs to move beyond the emphasis on culture and acknowledge the dimensions of inferiority and oppression to truly promote value for diversity and protect ethnic minority children from the dangers of systematic disadvantage that institutional racism represents.
    Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal 10/2014; 31(5):393-417.
  • Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: This study investigated the concurrent validity of a children’s narrative assessment tool, the Plenk Story-Telling Test (PST). The PST attempts to measure aspects of young children’s internal working models by eliciting narratives from nine pictures. The PST, child behavior checklist, and the parenting stress index were administered to a clinical sample and a community sample of children. Data from 262 participants were obtained. Children in the clinical sample significantly differed from the community sample on each instrument. The PST was reliably coded and most of the responses could be interpreted through a factor analysis. Consistent with hypotheses, children in the clinical sample viewed the world as a more dangerous place, were more preoccupied and less optimistic than those in the community sample. These findings support initial concurrent validity for the PST because it reliably distinguished between the two different groups, making the PST a potentially useful tool for both research and clinical uses.
    Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal 04/2014; 31(2).
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    ABSTRACT: This study attempts to review and compare research trends of 223 articles on homeless youth in American and South Korean journals from 2001 to 2010. 141 articles of 68 journals in the US and 82 articles of 43 journals in South Korea met criteria for inclusion in the review. The finding shows that there has been a continual increase in the number of articles on runaway and homeless youth issues over the last decade in both countries. The result of the analysis by content categories indicates American articles have explored more diverse topics and have focused on addressing the problems, while South Korean articles have focused on understanding the causes of becoming a runaway and offering service provision. The analysis of sampling frames shows American articles have mainly used ‘street youth sampling,’ whereas South Korean articles have utilized ‘shelter youth sampling’. The result of analysis by research methods indicates that ‘descriptive design’ is the most shared common research method across the two countries. These findings highlight the differences between research trends of the two countries. Implications for future research are discussed.
    Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal 04/2014; 31(2).
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this article is to report on the findings of an evaluation of a youth in foster care mentoring pilot program and the difficulty that arises when a program is not well implemented. The pilot program and evaluation of its effectiveness were mandated by the Texas 80th Legislature through the passing of HB 3008. Big Brothers Big Sisters of North Texas implemented the pilot to match youth in foster care age 14 years and older, who participate on a voluntary basis and who have been screened for participation by the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services (DFPS) with an adult mentor. As part of the pilot, youth were to receive 8 h of face-to-face time, and at least 1 h of phone, email, or text contact with their mentor. Though there were problems with implementation of the mentoring pilot, responses on the confidential youth survey suggest that those who did participate had positive experiences. Based on responses on the survey from the youth and based on the existing empirical literature on the benefits of mentoring programs for trouble youth and following the recommendations presented in this article the mentoring programs should be encouraged for youth aging out of foster care.
    Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal 04/2014; 31(2).
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    ABSTRACT: Early childhood education and care affects millions of young people, their parents, and ultimately society at large. Social workers are employed directly in early childhood education and care programs and also witness the results of inadequate early interventions in various practice settings. Yet social workers do little of the research related to this topic. Numerous issues relate to both social work and to thoughtful discussions of early childhood education and care, including the unequal use of high quality early education programs, which is ultimately a social justice issue. This article elucidates how social workers can and why they should contribute to practice, policy, and research related to early childhood education and care.
    Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal 03/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The problem of AIDS orphans in Zambia has reached alarming proportions because of the extent of poverty and poor social and economic policies. Worldwide, 15 million children have been orphaned due to AIDS, with 11.6 million orphans in sub-Saharan Africa alone (UNICEF, The State of the World’s Children 2009: maternal and newborn health, UNICEF, New York, 2008), and 670,000 children under the age of 17 in Zambia (UNAIDS, UNAIDS report on the global AIDS epidemic, UNAIDS, Geneva, 2010). Resulting from this situation are child headed households (CHHs) who face hunger, poor health, sanitation and water problems. Despite the challenges, there seems to be an absence of political will to support CHHs. To assess if Africans living in Richmond Virginia in the United States might offer something programmatically useful for CHHs in Zambia, important elements in the Richmond Independent Living services model were identified. Specific elements were screened using Africans as a cultural screen. Important implications for programming and practice suggest that feasibility, content and quality are key areas for appropriate CHHs programming. In this article, the terms orphans, vulnerable children, and young people are used interchangeably.
    Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal 02/2014; 31.
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    ABSTRACT: In recent years, interventions have been developed to meet the needs of children exposed to intimate partner violence (IPV). This study explores and analyses processes of participation during counselling as described by 29 children who had received community-based intervention for children exposed to IPV. The results of the analysis show how participation processes in the different phases of the intervention are related to three prerequisites for children actually receiving the intervention offered, namely (1) the child getting in contact with the unit, (2) the child starting the intervention process, and, because the intervention is directed at their experiences of IPV, and (3) the child actually talking about the violence. The implications of these results are used to discuss children’s willingness and reluctance to talk about IPV during interventions in which talking about their experiences is thought to be of therapeutic value.
    Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal 02/2014;