Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management (J WATER RES PL-ASCE )

Publisher: American Society of Civil Engineers. Water Resources Planning and Management Division, American Society of Civil Engineers

Description

Publishes technical papers, notes, and discussions on all phases of planning and management of water resources. Contributing engineers and researchers examine social, economic, environmental, and administrative concerns relating to the use and conservation of water. Social and environmental objectives in areas such as fish and wildlife management, water-based recreation, and wild and scenic river use are assessed. Recent developments in computer applications and systems analysis and a variety of ecological, cultural, and historical values of water resources are also featured.

  • Impact factor
    1.71
    Show impact factor history
     
    Impact factor
  • 5-year impact
    1.76
  • Cited half-life
    9.60
  • Immediacy index
    0.10
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.51
  • Website
    Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management website
  • Other titles
    Journal of water resources planning and management, American Society of Civil Engineers water resources planning and management, ASCE water resources planning and management, ASCE journal of water resources planning and management
  • ISSN
    0733-9496
  • OCLC
    8674714
  • Material type
    Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

American Society of Civil Engineers

  • Pre-print
    • Archiving status unclear
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Internet website or institutional repository
    • Must link to publisher version at ASCE Civil Engineering Database (http://cedb.asce.org)
    • Publisher copyright and source must be acknowledged
    • Reviewed 09 July 2014
    • Publishers' PDF may be used on an Intranet with password protection
  • Classification
    ​ blue

Publications in this journal

  • Shuo Wang, G. H. Huang, Y. Zhou
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    ABSTRACT: Flood management systems involve a variety of complexities, such as multiple uncertainties and their interdependences, as well as multiregion and dynamic features. This paper thus presents an inexact two-stage mixed-integer programming with random coefficients (ITMP-RC) model for flood management in a dynamic and uncertain environment. ITMP-RC is capable of addressing dual uncertainties expressed as random boundary intervals that exist in the coefficients of the objective function. A case study of flood diversion planning is used to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed methodology. Results indicate that total system costs would be rising gradually with increased probabilities of occurrence, implying a trade-off between economic objective and system safety. A variety of decision alternatives can be obtained under different policy scenarios, which are useful for decision makers to formulate appropriate flood management policies according to practical situations. The performance of ITMP-RC is analyzed and compared with an inexact two-stage stochastic programming model.
    Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management 11/2014;
  • Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management 11/2014; 140(11):04014031.
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    ABSTRACT: This paper explores the trade-offs between water quality and pumping costs objectives in optimization of operation of regional multiquality water distribution systems. The optimization model is designed to concurrently minimize each objective, where water quality is represented by the deviations of constituent concentrations from required values and pumping costs are represented by energy consumed by the pumps. The optimization problem is solved using an optimization software, incorporating the nondominated sorting genetic algorithm II (NSGA-II), linked with network analysis software. Two typical but purposefully different example networks are used. First, a network with multiple water sources of different qualities and second, a network with one water source only, which was converted to represent a regional nondrinking water distribution system. The trade-offs between water quality and pumping costs are explored using a total of 14 scenarios reflecting different water quality configurations of these networks. Those scenarios, into which time variability was introduced for both source water quality and customer water quality requirements, were systematically developed to represent real-life situations that could be found in practice. The results indicate that for the majority of the scenarios, there is a trade-off with a competing nature between water quality and pumping costs objectives. Additionally, it was discovered that multiobjective optimization problems with water quality (i.e., concentration deviations) and pumping costs objectives could be reduced in certain instances into a single-objective problem of minimizing pumping costs. In fact, a regional water distribution system in which water quality is represented by a single conservative constituent can produce either a trade-off or single-objective solution between those two objectives, and this outcome is dependent on both the water quality configuration of the system and system operational flexibility. Last, some particular conclusions are drawn for both a water distribution system with multiple water sources and a water distribution system with a single water source, which suggest how changes in source water qualities or customer water quality requirements may impact system operation. It is, therefore, demonstrated that water utilities which operate regional multiquality nondrinking water distribution systems could benefit from the exploration of trade-offs between water quality and pumping costs for the purpose of operational planning. Read More: http://ascelibrary.org/doi/abs/10.1061/(ASCE)WR.1943-5452.0000472
    Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Water consumption is perhaps the main process governing water distribution systems. Because of its uncertain nature, water consumption should be modeled as a stochastic process or characterized using statistical tools. This paper presents a description of water consumption using statistics as the mean, variance, and correlation. The analytical equations expressing the dependency of these statistics on the number of served users, observation time, and sampling rate, namely, the scaling laws, are theoretically derived and discussed. Real residential water consumption data are used to assess the validity of these theoretical scaling laws. The results show a good agreement between the scaling laws and scaling behavior of real data statistics. The scaling laws represent an innovative and powerful tool allowing inference of the statistical features of overall water consumption at each node of a network from the process that describes the demand of a user unit without loss of information about its variability and correlation structure. This will further allow the accurate simulation of overall nodal consumptions, reducing the computational time when modeling networks.
    Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management 07/2014; Just Released.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Water consumption is perhaps the main process governing water distribution systems. Because of its uncertain nature, water consumption should be modeled as a stochastic process or characterized using statistical tools. This paper presents a description of water consumption using statistics as the mean, variance, and correlation. The analytical equations expressing the dependency of these statistics on the number of served users, observation time, and sampling rate, namely, the scaling laws, are theoretically derived and discussed. Real residential water consumption data are used to assess the validity of these theoretical scaling laws. The results show a good agreement between the scaling laws and scaling behavior of real data statistics. The scaling laws represent an innovative and powerful tool allowing inference of the statistical features of overall water consumption at each node of a network from the process that describes the demand of a user unit without loss of information about its variability and correlation structure. This will further allow the accurate simulation of overall nodal consumptions, reducing the computational time when modeling networks. Read More: http://ascelibrary.org/doi/abs/10.1061/%28ASCE%29WR.1943-5452.0000467
    Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management 07/2014; Just Released.
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    ABSTRACT: In semi-arid regions, aquifers provide a series of practical advantages that make them preferential sources of water supply. In Spain, groundwater meets about one-fifth of the total water demand and is used to irrigate over one-third of the total irrigated land. This article examines groundwater use in Spain from the perspective of the EU Water Framework Directive. Analysis of different sector uses suggests that core problems (and solutions) related to groundwater lie in agricultural uses and that the Directive’s environmental requirements remain distant from reality on the ground, where economic, political and social reasons prevail on legal obligations set by national and supranational authorities.
    Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Climate change and increased urban demand can significantly stress water supply systems, emphasizing the importance of reallocating reservoir storage for the designed uses. Most studies on climate change assessment have analyzed arid region reservoirs due to high interannual variability in stream flows. This study focuses on a within-year reservoir system, Lake Jordan in North Carolina, from a temperate region that has been experiencing rapid growth since the 1990s. Given the interest in utilizing climate change projections for planning purposes, the current operational policies are evaluated, and revised rules for operating the within-year system over 30 year period (2012–2041) are suggested. Downscaled general circulation model (GCM) projections are used to implement the soil and water assessment tool (SWAT) model for the upper Cape Fear River basin to estimate changes in mean monthly stream flows during 2012–2041 at Lake Jordan. Projected monthly stream flows from four GCMs indicate wet winter conditions and increased interannual variability. The authors forced the reservoir model with multiple stream flow realizations that preserve the projected changes in monthly stream flow using a stochastic scheme. The within-year reservoir system performance was evaluated under stationary climate, climate change under existing and projected water demands, and by investigating interventions to ensure the design reliability under increased demands. These results indicate that the changes in the reliability due to increased urban demands are small because initial reservoir storage ensure the demand for multiple seasons. However, increases in the urban demand and stream flow variability tend to decrease the reservoir resiliency, forcing the within-year reservoir to behave like an over-year system. This could result in increased period of proactive measures such as restrictions and necessitates periodical reevaluation of drought management plans for better managing existing systems.
    Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: This study proposes a successive improved dynamic programming (SIDP) algorithm for hydropower reservoir operation based on an analysis of concavity, complementarity, and monotonicity of hydropower problems. For single-period hydropower generation, storage and release have diminishing marginal contributions to hydropower generation (i.e., concavity), and there is also a complementary effect between storage and release (i.e., release becomes more productive with increased storage). For multiple-period hydropower generation, the complementarity is shown to influence the concavity of objective function and the monotonicity of operation decisions, and is the major cause of complexity in hydropower operation. With the mathematical derivations, this study proposes a concave approximation to the hydropower generation function and a SIDP algorithm for hydropower reservoir operation. The efficiency of SIDP is demonstrated with two hypothetical case studies of long-term hydropower scheduling, which shows that the computation time of SIDP increases linearly with the number of storage intervals (i.e., O(n)), whereas DP shows a quadratic increase (i.e., O(n2)).
    Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management 03/2014; 140(3):365-374.
  • Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management 02/2014; 140(2):250-257.
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    ABSTRACT: Water distribution system (WDS) models may improve system control when applied using real-time data, and in doing so, help meet consumer and regulatory demands. Such real-time modeling often overlooks the multiple sources of system uncertainty that cascade into model forecasts and affect the identification of robust operational solutions. This paper considers key uncertainties in WDS modeling and reviews promising approaches for uncertainty quantification and reduction in the modeling cascade from calibration, through data assimilation, to model forecasting. An uncertainty framework exemplifying how such methods may be applied to propagate uncertainty through the real-time control process is outlined. Innovative methods to constrain uncertainty when the time-horizon and data availability limit such thorough analysis are also discussed, alongside challenges that need to be addressed to incorporate uncertain information into the control decision. Further work evaluating the value of these methods in light of computational resources, and the nature of model errors in real WDS, is required. Such work is necessary to demonstrate the benefits of considering model and data uncertainty, leading to robust control decisions. Read More: http://ascelibrary.org/doi/abs/10.1061/(ASCE)WR.1943-5452.0000325
    Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management 02/2014; 140(2):169-183.
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    ABSTRACT: Network model detail can influence the accuracy of results from analyses of water distribution systems. Previous work has shown the limitations of skeletonized network models when considering water quality and hydraulic effects. Loss of model detail is potentially less important for aggregated effects such as the systemwide health effects associated with a contamination event, but has received limited attention. The influence of model detail on such effects is examined here by comparing results obtained for contamination events using three large network models and several skeletonized versions of the models. Loss of model detail decreases the accuracy of estimated aggregated adverse effects related to contamination events. It has the potential to have a large negative influence on the results of consequence assessments and the design of contamination warning systems. However, the adverse influence on analysis results can be minimized by restricting attention to high percentile effects (i.e., 95th percentile or higher). Read More: http://ascelibrary.org/doi/abs/10.1061/%28ASCE%29WR.1943-5452.0000436
    Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management 01/2014;