Journal of Hydraulic Engineering (J HYDRAUL ENG-ASCE )

Publisher: American Society of Civil Engineers; American Society of Civil Engineers. Hydraulics Division, American Society of Civil Engineers

Journal description

A central forum for the dissemination of original work, this journal describes the analyses and solutions of problems in hydraulic engineering, hydrology, and water resources. Contributors emphasize concepts, methods, techniques, and results that advance knowledge, or are suitable for general application and use in the hydraulic engineering profession. Technical papers, notes, and professional discussions highlight hydraulic engineering issues ranging from short-term fluctuations in ground water to moment models of nonuniform channel-bend flow. On occasion, the results of any technical, economic, or social facet of the use and conservation of water as a natural resource are published.

Current impact factor: 1.26

Impact Factor Rankings

2015 Impact Factor Available summer 2015
2013 / 2014 Impact Factor 1.258
2012 Impact Factor 1.276
2011 Impact Factor 1.429
2010 Impact Factor 1.227
2009 Impact Factor 1.478
2008 Impact Factor 1.272
2007 Impact Factor 0.876
2006 Impact Factor 1.004
2005 Impact Factor 1.214
2004 Impact Factor 1.241
2003 Impact Factor 0.849
2002 Impact Factor 0.986
2001 Impact Factor 0.69
2000 Impact Factor 0.579
1999 Impact Factor 1.018
1998 Impact Factor 0.493
1997 Impact Factor 0.319
1996 Impact Factor 0.392
1995 Impact Factor 0.768
1994 Impact Factor 0.844
1993 Impact Factor 0.585
1992 Impact Factor 0.678

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 1.88
Cited half-life 0.00
Immediacy index 0.20
Eigenfactor 0.01
Article influence 0.70
Website Journal of Hydraulic Engineering website
Other titles Journal of hydraulic engineering (New York, N.Y.), Journal of hydraulic engineering, Hydraulic engineering, A.S.C.E. hydraulic engineering, ASCE hydraulic engineering, ASCE journal of hydraulic engineering
ISSN 0733-9429
OCLC 8672558
Material type Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

American Society of Civil Engineers

  • Pre-print
    • Archiving status unclear
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Internet website or institutional repository
    • Must link to publisher version at ASCE Civil Engineering Database (http://cedb.asce.org)
    • Publisher copyright and source must be acknowledged
    • Reviewed 09 July 2014
    • Publishers' PDF may be used on an Intranet with password protection
  • Classification
    ​ blue

Publications in this journal

  • Journal of Hydraulic Engineering 02/2015;
  • Journal of Hydraulic Engineering 02/2015;
  • Journal of Hydraulic Engineering 01/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: An experimental investigation on measurement of 3-D instantaneous velocity profiles in a mobile boundary channel with uniform and non-uniform sediments are reported. The estimated velocity fluctuations from measured velocity profiles along the center line of the flume are used to quantify the nature of bursting events, and turbulence characteristics on uniform (finer and coarser) and non-uniform sediments. The analysis presented in the paper indicated that sediment characteristics play very significant roles for existence of aforesaid characteristics (turbulence characteristics and bursting events) near the channel beds and fluid flow regions in the main flow. Further investigations on aforesaid theme are recommended, while taking the measurements on velocity profiles along the depths across the channel width including the center line depth of the channel.
    Journal of Hydraulic Engineering 01/2015;
  • Journal of Hydraulic Engineering 01/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper discusses the ability of the two-dimensional (2D) shallow water equations to model meandering flows in shallow rectangular reservoirs. Four meandering flows of various shallowness were modeled using an academic flow model that includes a depth-averaged k-ϵ model accounting for the horizontal and vertical turbulent length-scales. Different roughness heights were considered for modeling the bottom friction. A proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) was applied to the simulation results to extract the behavior of the main structures responsible for the meandering flow. The same POD analysis was also performed for the reference experimental flow fields, obtained by large-scale particle image velocimetry. The first two POD modes obtained from the numerical simulations assuming a smooth bottom are in good agreement with the experimental modes in terms of energy, as well as temporal and spatial variations, whatever the shallowness. In contrast, the remaining simulated modes are not well rendered. The effect of an increased roughness height in the simulations is finally discussed. It leads to an improved reproduction of the first two modes and of the following modes, except when significant viscous effects govern in the flow.
    Journal of Hydraulic Engineering 01/2015;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The present study focuses on riprap protection at single piers under live-bed conditions. The riprap mattress is displayed so that its top is levelled with the surrounding river bed, for ease in the construction process. Over 48 laboratory experiments have been carried out to understand the trend of the required riprap mattress width to protect single piers against edge and bedform undermining failures. The influence of bedform height on the required width is emphasized. A simple expression is given to calculate the required riprap mattress width; for low sediment transport rates the expressions given in the literature for clear-water conditions are recovered.
    Journal of Hydraulic Engineering 01/2015; in press.
  • Journal of Hydraulic Engineering 12/2014; 140(12):04014060.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study explores the comprehensive calibration potential of impedance-based methods implementing several unsteady friction models for a pipeline system with or without leakage. The corresponding response functions in the frequency domain approach have been derived by the impulse response method and incorporated into the genetic algorithm-based calibration method. Unsteady models addressed either frequency-dependent friction or acceleration-based frictions. Parameter calibration exercises with experimental data have shown that the impedance-based approach provides a versatile and feasible optimization framework via the fitting of an objective function based on the predicted and measured pressure head variation. To check the impact of pressure pulsation and noise, extended calibration tests were performed using oscillated and disturbed pressure data bounded by the frequency and amplitude of a pump system and the measurement error of a conventional pressure transducer. The performance of the integrated optimization examples demonstrates the robustness of the impedance-based approach, both in the representation of a real-life system and the configuration of various system characteristics.
    Journal of Hydraulic Engineering 12/2014; 140(12):04014063.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Pressure management has been used for more than 3 decades to reduce leakage from water distribution systems. While few of these studies have been published, information on the ranges of field study leakage exponents is available. In contrast, several studies on the pressure-leakage relationship of individual leaks have been published, and verified models have been developed for predicting the response of elastically deforming leaks. The main aim of this paper was to determine whether researchers’ current understanding of the pressure-leakage response of individual leaks can be reconciled with the observed pressure-leakage response of district metered areas containing many leaks. To investigate this, a model of the distribution of individual leaks and their parameters was developed based on available literature and expert advice. A repeatability study showed that such a model can indeed produce typical distributions of leakage exponents found in field studies. A sensitivity analysis of the various parameters showed that the average system pressure and condition of the system had the greatest influence on the system leakage exponent. Finally, it was shown that a small fraction of leaks with high leakage numbers (i.e., in highly flexible material or closing under zero pressure conditions) can explain the high background leakage exponents often found in systems with only background leakage
    Journal of Hydraulic Engineering 12/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Pressure management has been used for more than 3 decades to reduce leakage from water distribution systems. While few of these studies have been published, information on the ranges of field study leakage exponents is available. In contrast, several studies on the pressure-leakage relationship of individual leaks have been published, and verified models have been developed for predicting the response of elastically deforming leaks. The main aim of this paper was to determine whether researchers’ current understanding of the pressure-leakage response of individual leaks can be reconciled with the observed pressure-leakage response of district metered areas containing many leaks. To investigate this, a model of the distribution of individual leaks and their parameters was developed based on available literature and expert advice. A repeatability study showed that such a model can indeed produce typical distributions of leakage exponents found in field studies. A sensitivity analysis of the various parameters showed that the average system pressure and condition of the system had the greatest influence on the system leakage exponent. Finally, it was shown that a small fraction of leaks with high leakage numbers (i.e., in highly flexible material or closing under zero pressure conditions) can explain the high background leakage exponents often found in systems with only background leakage.
    Journal of Hydraulic Engineering 12/2014;
  • Journal of Hydraulic Engineering 12/2014; 140(12):04014062.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The accurate prediction of the dilution and motion of the produced denser water (e.g., discharge of concentrated brine generated during solution mining and desalination) is of importance for environmental protection. Boundary conditions and ambient stratification can significantly affect the dilution and motion of gravity currents. In this study, a multiphase model was applied to simulate the gravity current descending a slope into a linearly stratified ambient. The k-ω turbulence model was used to better simulate the near-bed motion. The mathematical model, the initial and boundary conditions, and the details of the numerical scheme are described here. The time-dependent evolution of the gravity current, the flow thickness, and the velocity and density field were simulated for a range of flow parameters. Simulations show that the Kelvin–Helmholtz (K-H) billows are generated at the top of the trailing fluid by the interfacial velocity shear. The K-H instability becomes weaker with the slope distance from the source because of the decrease in interfacial velocity shear along the slope. The ambient stratification restricts and decreases the current head velocity as it descends the slope, which differs from the situation in the homogenous ambient while the head velocity remains in an approximately steady state. Motion of the descending flow into the stratified ambient has two stages: initial acceleration and deceleration at a later stage based on the balance of inertial, buoyancy, and friction forces. When the descending current approaches the initial neutral position at a later stage, it separates from the slope and spreads horizontally into the environment. The simulated results, such as vertical velocity and density profiles and front positions, agree well with the measurements, indicating that the mathematical model can be successfully applied to simulate the effect of the boundary conditions and ambient stratification on the dilution and propagation of gravity currents.
    Journal of Hydraulic Engineering 12/2014; 140(12).
  • Journal of Hydraulic Engineering 12/2014; 140(12).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A distorted physical model, based on Ürkmez Dam in Izmir, Turkey, was built to study sudden partial dam break flows. The distorted model had a horizontal scale of 1=150 and a vertical scale of 1=30, containing dam reservoir, dam body, and downstream area—from dam body to Ürkmez urban area until the sea coast. In the model, the reservoir is approximately 12 m3, the dam body has a width of 2.84 m and a height of 1.07 m, and the downstream area is nearly 200 m2. The Ürkmez Dam was chosen because Ürkmez Town is located right at its downstream area, allowing the study of dam break flows in an urban area. Furthermore, the dimensions were suitable such that it allowed the construction of a physical model (dam reservoir, dam body, and downstream area) having a horizontal scale of 1=150 in the available space of 300 m2. The features creating roughness such as buildings, bridge, and roads were also reflected in the physical model. The dam break flow was investigated for sudden partial collapse, which was simulated by a trapezoidal breach on the dam body. The water depths at downstream area were measured at eight different locations by using eþWATER L (level) sensors. The velocities were measured at four different locations by ultrasonic velocity profiler (UVP) transducers. The propagation of the flood was recorded by a high-defnition camera. The experimental results show that the Ürkmez area can be flooded in a matter of minutes, at depths reaching up to 3 m in residential areas in 4 min. The flood wave front can reach the residential areas in 2 min and to the sea coast in 4 min. Flow velocities can reach 70.9 km=h in sparse residential areas, close to dam body. Away from the dam body in the sparse buildings part of the town, the velocities can reach 27.7 km=h. In dense residential areas of the town, the velocities are too low (2.8 km=h) but flow depths can reach 3 m. Velocity profiles show similar behavior like unsteady and nonuniform open channel flow in nonresidential areas close to the dam body. In residential areas away from the dam body, the velocity profiles are more uniform, having lower velocity values. Vertical variations of velocities show markedly different behavior during rising and recession stages. The profiles are smooth during the rising stage in sparse residential area, yet it shows fluctuating behavior during the recession stage.
    Journal of Hydraulic Engineering 11/2014; 11:05014006.