Journal of prison & jail health

Description

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  • 5-year impact
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  • Other titles
    Journal of prison & jail health, Journal of prison and jail health
  • ISSN
    0731-8332
  • OCLC
    8261167
  • Material type
    Periodical
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Describes 5 cases of male jail inmates who ingested either 1 of 2 depilatory (shaving) products which contain barium sulfide as the toxic component. One of the cases resulted in a fatality. The suicide rate in penal institutions is 3 times higher than the national average. It is suggested that correctional facilities remain alert to the risk of suicide in the jail population. Potentially toxic products such as barium containing depilatories should be restricted in use, or should be substituted for with safer products in this high risk population. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Journal of prison & jail health 01/1993;
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    ABSTRACT: Addresses the steps that need to be taken to care for the increasing population of elderly inmates in America's prisons. Safety, medical care, and programs that build good morale are identified as major areas of concern. Particular attention is paid to identifying the special needs of the elderly and how these can best be met within the corrections environment. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Journal of prison & jail health 01/1993;
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    ABSTRACT: Examined the differential health service needs of 399 male and female youths (aged 10–18 yrs) entering a juvenile detention center. Comparisons were made on sociodemographic characteristics, family problems, records of contact with the juvenile court, physical abuse or sexual victimization history, alcohol/other drug use, friends' involvement in substance use and crime, and emotional/psychological functioning problems. A stepwise discriminant analysis of the data indicates that female detainees were significantly more likely to have been sexually victimized and to have more contact with a juvenile court for status offense reasons and for being sexually abused/exploited, whereas male detainees had higher referral rates for delinquency offenses and self-reported greater participation in theft crimes. It is suggested that mental health oriented programs are especially needed for female youths involved in the juvenile justice system. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Journal of prison & jail health 01/1993;
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    ABSTRACT: Argues that prison health workers must manage prison pathology both clinically and from the perspective of its public health implications. Health problems that are experienced on both sides of prison walls include substance abuse, acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), hepatitis, trauma, violence, tuberculosis, suicide, mental illness, and venereal disease. It is suggested that prison health workers join with state and local health professionals to assure that both personal and public health needs are optimally served. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Journal of prison & jail health 01/1991;
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    ABSTRACT: Studied the physical and psychological health problems that incarcerated women have at the time of incarceration and after a period of incarceration. Data were collected through interviews with 135 women during the 1st wk of their incarceration and follow-up interviews with 55 of the Ss after 6 mo in prison. Results reveal that women enter prison with numerous health problems and that these problems persist. Specific health problems documented were severe psychological disturbances, substance abuse, obesity, and gynecological disorders, as well as numerous stress-related symptoms. Ss also exhibited a high utilization rate of health care services. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Journal of prison & jail health 01/1991;
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    ABSTRACT: Collected data in the 2nd phase of a longitudinal study previously reported on by R. Dembo et al (in press) involving young residents at a detention center. Initial interviews were conducted with 399 detainees and follow-up interviews were completed with 236 male and 69 female Ss 11–14 mo later. Findings highlight the different roles played by Ss' physical abuse and sexual victimization experiences in their use of marijuana/hashish and cocaine over time. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Journal of prison & jail health 01/1990;
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    ABSTRACT: Investigated the prevalence of mental disorder among 190 male prison inmates (aged 15+ yrs) using a needs assessment survey for prison populations. 45 Ss had at least 1 inpatient psychiatric experience prior to incarceration. 23 Ss had been admitted to inpatient psychiatric units during incarceration. The frequency of hospitalizations was 1 admission, 50%; 2 admissions, 25%; 3+ admissions, 25%. 26 additional inmates had received nonresidential, clinic-based, psychiatric care consisting of verbal therapy or psychopharmacology. Medical record abstraction indicated that 12.6% of Ss were currently receiving psychiatric treatment with an additional 4.2% requiring but refusing prescribed treatment. The prevalence of psychiatric disability was 19.5% needing treatment, with an additional 8.9% with possible psychiatric problems requiring further evaluation. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Journal of prison & jail health 01/1989;
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    ABSTRACT: Reviews the literature on the health status of juvenile delinquents, including a community perspective conceptual model; overviews of adolescents, juvenile delinquency and the learning disability/juvenile delinquency association; assessments of the health problems of juvenile delinquents; and the health care delivery systems in juvenile systems. Most articles are on assessment and description. Largely absent are the areas of planning, implementation and evaluation. 12 recommendations address system needs for juvenile delinquent health care delivery, including (1) seeking system-wide accreditation; (2) interacting with community health caregivers, educators and institutions; and (3) cooperating with existing data gathering and research institutions. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Journal of prison & jail health 01/1989;
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    ABSTRACT: Reviews the literature on the problem of the incarceration of mentally ill persons. Because most jails are ill-equipped to provide the required diagnosis and treatment, the problem of self-destructive behavior often arises. The need for mental health screening in jails is noted, and more involvement of mental health professionals in finding appropriate solutions is advocated. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Journal of prison & jail health 01/1985;
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    ABSTRACT: Studied medical charts and confinement records, and reviewed other data on the 38 male prisoners who committed suicide from January 1980 to October 1985, while incarcerated under the authority of the Texas Department of Corrections. Data are provided according to age, race, sex, marital status, criminal history, offense for which the S was incarcerated at the time of suicide, length of sentence, history of mental illness and prior suicide attempts, involvement of alcohol or drugs, and characteristics of the suicide act. It appears that the most salient characteristics include a history of mental illness and suicide attempts and conviction of a death-related offense. Verbal threats of suicide, bizarre or withdrawn behavior, and recent message of bad news were situational characteristics significantly associated with suicide. Policy recommendations are outlined. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Journal of prison & jail health 01/1985;
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    ABSTRACT: Describes efforts to serve mentally retarded inmates in the Georgia State Prison (GSP). Strategies in identifying mentally retarded inmates (e.g., assessment of intelligence and adaptive behavior) and implementing programs for them (e.g., development of individualized educational plans) are detailed. The program grew out of a lawsuit brought by inmates at GSP in 1973, and it mandates habilitation by means of educational, vocational, life skills programs, and by group counseling. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Journal of prison & jail health 01/1985;
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    ABSTRACT: Reports results of a national survey undertaken in 1983 to determine the availability of health services in juvenile detention and correctional facilities. Deficiencies identified included the need for ongoing mental health care. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Journal of prison & jail health 01/1984;
  • Journal of prison & jail health 01/1982; 2(1):41-6.
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    ABSTRACT: Presents the case of a 30-yr-old White male prisoner who staged a hunger strike and describes the resolution of this strike by prison officials. The pathophysiology and physical findings on starvation are reviewed and historical perspectives from Britain, France, Canada, and the US are discussed along with the ethical and legal issues surrounding hunger-striking prisoners. The question of whether the hunger strike is, in reality, threatened suicide is addressed. The opinion developing in the US for management of hunger-striking inmates is discussed, and institutional policy and procedures for dealing with hunger strikers are presented. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Journal of prison & jail health 01/1970;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Due to the nature of prison conditions, inmate codes, and staff attitudes, prison administrators and the general public fail to appreciate the extent and seriousness of rape in prison. Inmate rape is not primarily a sexually motivated act but instead constitutes a sexual expression of aggression that may be retaliatory, compensatory, and/or erotic. The trauma experienced by a male inmate victim of rape may be even more devastating than for a female victim since he is devalued in regard to the 2 primary sources of his male identity; sexuality and aggression. In addition, he continues to live in the same institution as his attacker. Civil litigation regarding institutional liability is increasing, and it is incumbent upon correctional institutions to train their personnel in regard to identifying, treating, and preventing inmate sexual abuse. The major features to be addressed for a model protocol are presented. (10 ref) (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Journal of prison & jail health
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    ABSTRACT: A comparison of the general knowledge about acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) acquisition and transmission of 210 newly incarcerated male inmates in Maryland was compared with a random sample of 1,766 men interviewed by the National Center for Health Statistics. Knowledge of AIDS, likely and unlikely routes of transmission of HIV-1, and contraceptive methods of preventing HIV-1 transmission were very high and similar in the 2 groups. However, perceived risk of acquiring HIV-1 was significantly higher among prisoners, possibly reflecting that a substantial proportion possess a pre-incarceration history of iv drug use. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Journal of prison & jail health
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    ABSTRACT: Conducted in-depth interviews with 61 detention center staff before and after the implementation of full-time mental health services. Findings support the view that the services of the mental health counselor (MHC) had a salutatory impact on the activities of the center. The MHC's positive impact was attributed to her role as a resource person; a safety valve to relieve detainee and staff tension, hostility, and frustration; a link between the center and an alcohol and substance abuse outreach program; and a trainer to help staff learn how to deal with stress and tension on-the-job. The level of stress among staff remaining at the center declined while the MHC was present, whereas the level of stress among staff who resigned increased over the same period. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Journal of prison & jail health 01/1970;
  • Journal of prison & jail health 2(1):15-26.
  • Journal of prison & jail health 2(2):116-24.