Clinical Gerontologist Journal Impact Factor & Information

Publisher: Taylor & Francis (Routledge)

Journal description

The superlative journal of aging and mental health, Clinical Gerontologist presents timely material relevant to the needs of mental health professionals and all practitioners who deal with the aged client. The journal is designed for psychologists, physicians, nurses, social workers, and counselors (family, pastoral, and vocational) who address the issues commonly found in later life, including: adjustments to changing roles, dementia, caregivers, depression, hypochondriasis, paranoia. Here is an excellent and informative resource for mental health professionals and practitioners who work with elderly clients. There is no "poetry and politics" in Clinical Gerontologist, nor is there dry theory with no practical application. All articles in this practitioners' journal feature timely, practical material relevant and applicable to the assessment and management of mental disorders in later life.

Current impact factor: 0.66

Impact Factor Rankings

2015 Impact Factor Available summer 2015
2013 / 2014 Impact Factor 0.66
2012 Impact Factor 0.464
2011 Impact Factor 0.727

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 0.68
Cited half-life 0.00
Immediacy index 0.08
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.25
Website Clinical Gerontologist website
Other titles Clinical gerontologist
ISSN 0731-7115
OCLC 8236085
Material type Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis (Routledge)

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • On author's personal website or departmental website immediately
    • On institutional repository or subject-based repository after either 12 months embargo
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • The publisher will deposit in on behalf of authors to a designated institutional repository including PubMed Central, where a deposit agreement exists with the repository
    • STM: Science, Technology and Medicine
    • Publisher last contacted on 25/03/2014
    • This policy is an exception to the default policies of 'Taylor & Francis (Routledge)'
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A growing number of ethnically diverse persons are diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease and related disorders (ADRD). Cognitive impairment is a key antecedent to agitation in persons with ADRD. There is increased recognition for the identification and testing of non-pharmacological interventions for the management of agitation in ethnically diverse populations. The evidence-based guideline of individualized music, currently in its 5th edition (Gerdner, 2013a), is one such intervention. This guideline has been tested in eight countries. In keeping with the holistic approach to this intervention, this article focuses on the importance of incorporating the role of ethnicity in the assessment of individualized music. This is underscored with a previously unpublished case example of a Mexican American man.
    Clinical Gerontologist 12/2015; 38(2):179-186. DOI:10.1080/07317115.2014.988900
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Treatment of personality disorders (PDs) in older adults is a highly underexplored topic. In this article clinical applicability of the findings from a recent Delphi study regarding treatment aspects of PDs in older adults is explored. This concerns the relevance of three psychotherapeutic treatment levels for PDs in later life: 1) personality-changing treatment, 2) adaptation-enhancing treatment and 3) supportive-structuring treatment. By means of three cases concerning the three levels, all from a cognitive behavioral perspective, namely 1) schema therapy, 2) cognitive behavioral therapy and 3) behavioral therapy, we illustrate the usefulness of the different levels in the selection of treatment for older adults with PDs. Throughout all treatment levels, attention to specific age-related psychotherapeutic topics - such as loss of health and autonomy, cohort beliefs, sociocultural context, beliefs about and consequences of somatic comorbidity, intergenerational linkages, and changing life perspectives - is crucial, as they often cause an exacerbation of personality pathology in later life. Suggestions as to how to adapt existing treatments within a cognitive behavioral framework in order to better mold them to the needs and experiences of older adults with PDs, are discussed.
    Clinical Gerontologist 06/2015; 38(4):325-341.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Treatment of personality disorders (PDs) in older adults is a highly underexplored topic. In this article clinical applicability of the findings from a recent Delphi study regarding treatment aspects of PDs in older adults is explored. This concerns the relevance of three psychotherapeutic treatment levels for PDs in later life: 1) personality-changing treatment, 2) adaptation-enhancing treatment and 3) supportive-structuring treatment. By means of three cases concerning the three levels, all from a cognitive behavioral perspective, namely 1) schema therapy, 2) cognitive behavioral therapy and 3) behavioral therapy, we illustrate the usefulness of the different levels in the selection of treatment for older adults with PDs. Throughout all treatment levels, attention to specific age-related psychotherapeutic topics - such as loss of health and autonomy, cohort beliefs, sociocultural context, beliefs about and consequences of somatic comorbidity, intergenerational linkages, and changing life perspectives - is crucial, as they often cause an exacerbation of personality pathology in later life. Suggestions as to how to adapt existing treatments within a cognitive behavioral framework in order to better mold them to the needs and experiences of older adults with PDs, are discussed.
    Clinical Gerontologist 05/2015; DOI:10.1080/07317115.2015.1032464
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    ABSTRACT: There are various reasons underlying why older adults find themselves in the role of a caregiver to their adult child, ranging from having a child born with a developmental disability, to having a child who suffers from a long term disability to having an adult child who has been diagnosed with a psychological disorder to raising one’s grandchildren in the absence of their adult children. The caregiving literature focuses almost entirely on care provided to the older adult, rather than by the older adult. Unlike the breadth of literature on these adult children or spouse caregivers, there is a dearth of literature about this cohort and the impact that care provision has on their mental health and well-being. This may be largely due to the lack of a framework for identifying and focusing on the needs of this cohort of caregivers. The only framework to date has focused on the bi-directionality of care when the adult child is at the center of care provision. As older adult caregivers age, they are pressed between their own physical and emotional aging needs and providing care to their adult children. The conceptualization of caregivers in this cohort as the Panini Sandwich Generation provides the needed lens by which mental health professionals can begin to explore and address the emotional and psychological needs and experiences of older adult caregivers.
    Clinical Gerontologist 05/2015; DOI:10.1080/07317115.2015.1032466
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    ABSTRACT: This article presents the qualitative results of semi-structured interviews with five established couples where one individual was diagnosed with early stage Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The interviews were designed to explore the effects of the initial diagnosis, the felt experience of the disease by both members of the couple and the resulting impact on the couple’s dynamics. The aim of the study was to discover the issues unique to this situation, what successful management strategies these couples may have found, and thus to inform the future provision of couples therapies where AD is present. The primary findings support results found in other recent studies of couples encountering AD with some additional insights: (a) The actual diagnosis was very difficult to hear. An unexpected finding in this study was that the way the diagnosis was delivered was often more traumatic than the diagnosis itself. (b) All couples reported challenging issues of increasing dependency and marked changes in the balance of independent action for each partner versus shared responsibilities. In addition, couples shared their individual experiences of anger as a response to unfulfilled performance expectations, both by the AD patient and the well spouse. (c) This small study group saw travel, a common activity for older people, as maintaining “couplehood” in addition to its other benefits.
    Clinical Gerontologist 05/2015; DOI:10.1080/07317115.2015.1032465
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study describes the initial contact of 255 potential participants, recruitment of 63 participants, and retention of 57 participants from three geriatric Hoarding Disorder (HD) studies. Patients with HD were easily recruited from the community, primarily through the use of clinician referrals and posted flyers, as evidenced by steady patient flow despite lack of compensation for participation. Contrary to treatment outcomes of late life mood and anxiety disorders, geriatric HD patients are largely retained in clinical research treatment studies.
    Clinical Gerontologist 05/2015; DOI:10.1080/07317115.2015.1032467
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study aimed to test a model of telephone-assisted behavioral activation (BA) intervention for Chinese dementia caregivers to reduce the level of depressive symptoms of caregivers. The study compared two telephone interventions using a four-month longitudinal randomized controlled trial. For the first four weeks, all participants received the same psychoeducation program via telephone. Then for the following four months, eight biweekly telephone follow-up calls were carried out. For these eight follow-up calls, participants were randomized into either one of the two following groups with different conditions. For the Psychoeducation with (PsyED-BA) group, participants received eight biweekly sessions of BA practice focused on pleasant event scheduling and improving communications. For the Psychoeducation only (PsyED Only) group, there were eight biweekly sessions of general discussion of psychoeducation and related information. The telephone administration of the BA and general discussion component was administered with the help of senior citizens and also university students engaged as paraprofessionals. A total of 96 family caregivers of persons living with dementia were recruited and 93 caregivers completed the whole study. As compared to the PsyED Only group, the PsyED-BA had significantly decreased levels of level of depressive symptoms. Caregivers who reported longer caregiving hours at baseline were found to benefit more from the intervention. For the PsyED-BA group, there was an increase in the frequency of using emotional regulation strategies after the BA training. Findings can contribute to the literature by offering some framework for developing accessible, sustainable and cost-effective interventions.
    Clinical Gerontologist 04/2015; 38(3):150415122113007. DOI:10.1080/07317115.2015.1008118
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Misconceptions about Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are important to identify because they can interfere with treatment, caregiving, and understanding of the disease. The present study aimed to identify core misconceptions of AD and describe variations in endorsement of these misconceptions between groups (e.g., health care professionals vs. non–health care professionals); 2989 partic- ipants completed 10 items that assess AD misconceptions. There were notable differences in the prevalence of these misconceptions, which varied from 8% (prescription drugs can prevent Alzheimer’s disease) to 68% (reminder notes contribute to decline). Health care professionals were less likely to endorse that AD is a normal part of aging compared to non–health care professionals (13% vs. 16%). Understanding which misconceptions are most common is critical for designing and tailoring educational interventions. Full text available at: http://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/XCBngHpyInvMEpXvQ827/full
    Clinical Gerontologist 03/2015; 38:149-156. DOI:10.1080/07317115.2014.990600
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Individuals with dementia have difficulty distinguishing their personal items and spaces from others, which creates problems in long-term care (LTC). Prosthetic memory aids may help facilitate recognition. This study assessed which self-referent stimuli were best recognized by individuals with dementia. LTC residents with dementia (n =27) were shown arrays of three stimuli and asked to select the picture/name that featured them. Stimulus arrays included photographs from young adulthood, middle adulthood, current age, and their printed name. Most participants (95%) completed the assessment and recognized at least one stimulus type above chance levels. Participants recognized printed names most accurately (M = 89%). Current photographs were recognized least (M = 64%). Printed names and early adulthood photographs facilitate self-recognition in individuals with dementia.
    Clinical Gerontologist 02/2015; 38(2):150203063256004. DOI:10.1080/07317115.2014.990602
  • Clinical Gerontologist 01/2015; 38(1):68-87. DOI:10.1080/07317115.2014.970319
  • Clinical Gerontologist 01/2015; 38(1):32-48. DOI:10.1080/07317115.2014.970316
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Perception of caregiver burden among stroke survivors varies based on socioeconomic and cultural backgrounds. The objectives of this study were to identify the burdens among Thai caregivers of older stroke survivors, characteristics of caregivers and severity of caregiver burden. Caregivers of older stroke survivors were randomly interviewed (March–June, 2012). Information on baseline characteristics and caregiver burden using Zarit Burden Inventory (ZBI) was collected. One hundred one participants were assessed. The mean ZBI was 21.6 ± 14.5 [95% CI, 18.7–24.8]. More than half of caregivers reported no burden (54.5%). High burdens were associated with low self-reported income, high numbers of basic activities of daily living needed and coexisting musculoskeletal conditions. The observed low degree of burden might be the result of the sociocultural view of the study participants.
    Clinical Gerontologist 01/2015; 38(1):19-31. DOI:10.1080/07317115.2014.970315
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The current study explores the role of social support in changes in quality of life resulting from home-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). One hundred thirty-seven participants, characterized primarily as rural, low-resource, and frail, were randomly assigned to either CBT or a minimal support control condition. Hierarchical regression revealed that positive change in satisfaction with social support was associated with improvement in quality of life beyond the effects of the CBT treatment. In addition, pretreatment satisfaction with social support and change in satisfaction with social support moderated the effect of CBT on quality of life. These results suggest that bolstering social support concomitant to CBT may increase quality of life.
    Clinical Gerontologist 01/2015; 38(2):150113110640001. DOI:10.1080/07317115.2014.990598
  • Clinical Gerontologist 01/2015; 38(1):88-102. DOI:10.1080/07317115.2014.973132