Hearing Research (HEARING RES )

Publisher: Elsevier

Description

The aim of the journal is to provide a forum for papers concerned with basic auditory mechanisms. Emphasis is on experimental studies, but theoretical papers will also be considered. The editor of the journal is prepared to accept original research papers in the form of full-length papers, short communications, letters to the Editor, and reviews. Papers submitted should deal with auditory neurophysiology, ultrastructure, psychoacoustics and behavioural studies of hearing in animals, and models of auditory functions. Papers on comparative aspects of hearing in animals and man, and on effects of drugs and environmental contaminants on hearing function will also be considered. Clinical papers will not be accepted unless they contribute to the understanding of normal hearing functions.

Impact factor 2.85

  • Hide impact factor history
     
    Impact factor
  • 5-year impact
    2.74
  • Cited half-life
    0.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.62
  • Eigenfactor
    0.01
  • Article influence
    0.99
  • Website
    Hearing Research website
  • Other titles
    Hearing research
  • ISSN
    0378-5955
  • OCLC
    4410062
  • Material type
    Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

Elsevier

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Pre-print allowed on any website or open access repository
    • Voluntary deposit by author of authors post-print allowed on authors' personal website, arXiv.org or institutions open scholarly website including Institutional Repository, without embargo, where there is not a policy or mandate
    • Deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate only allowed where separate agreement between repository and the publisher exists.
    • Permitted deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental policy or mandate, may be required to comply with embargo periods of 12 months to 48 months .
    • Set statement to accompany deposit
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to journal home page or articles' DOI
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • NIH Authors articles will be submitted to PubMed Central after 12 months
    • Publisher last contacted on 18/10/2013
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The early contributions of the UCSF cochlear implant (CI) research team to the development of multiple-channel cochlear implants from about 1971 through the mid-1980s are briefly summarized. Scientists at UCSF conducted fundamental studies related to device safety, the control of patterned electrical stimulation, and the designs of intracochlear electrode arrays, coders, and implanted multiple-channel electrode drivers. They conducted many original studies documenting parameters of hearing with cochlear implants relevant to next-generation CI designs. On these bases, the UCSF team constructed early models of multichannel devices that were progenitors of the Advanced Bionics' Clarion CI. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.
    Hearing Research 01/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: .. DOWNLOAD ARTICLE: http://authors.elsevier.com/a/1Q7ey1M5IZ82cn
    Hearing Research 01/2015; 319:32-47.
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    ABSTRACT: Patients with single sided deafness have recently begun receiving cochlear implants in their deaf ear. These patients gain a significant benefit from having a cochlear implant. However, despite this benefit, they are considerably slower to develop binaural abilities such as summation compared to bilateral cochlear implant patients. This suggests that these patients have difficulty fusing electric and acoustic signals. Although this may reflect inherent differences between electric and acoustic stimulation, it may also reflect properties of the processor and fitting system, which result in spectral and temporal compression. To examine the possibility that unilateral spectral and temporal compression can adversely affect binaural fusion, this study tested normal hearing listeners’ binaural fusion through the use of vocoded speech with unilateral spectral and temporal compression. The results indicate that unilateral spectral and temporal compression can hinder binaural fusion and thus may adversely affect binaural abilities in patients with single sided deafness who use a cochlear implant in their deaf ear.
    Hearing Research 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: We determined the absolute hearing sensitivity of the red fox (Vulpes vulpes) using an adapted standard psychoacoustic procedure. The animals were tested in a reward-based go/no-go procedure in a semi-anechoic chamber. At 60 dB sound pressure level (SPL) (re 20 μPa) red foxes perceive pure tones between 51 Hz and 48 kHz, spanning 9.84 octaves with a single peak sensitivity of -15 dB at 4 kHz. The red foxes’ high-frequency cutoff is comparable to that of the domestic dog while the low-frequency cutoff is comparable to that of the domestic cat and the absolute sensitivity is between both species. The maximal absolute sensitivity of the red fox is among the best found to date in any mammal. The procedure used here allows for assessment of animal auditory thresholds using positive reinforcement outside the laboratory.
    Hearing Research 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Several multipolar current focusing strategies are examined in a computational model of the implanted human cochlea. The model includes a realistic spatial distribution of cell bodies of the auditory neurons throughout Rosenthal’s canal. Simulations are performed of monopolar, (partial) tripolar and phased array stimulation. Excitation patterns, estimated thresholds, electrical dynamic range, excitation density and neural recruitment curves are determined and compared. The main findings are: (I) current focusing requires electrical field interaction to induce spatially restricted excitation patterns. For perimodiolar electrodes the distance to the neurons is too small to have sufficient electrical field interaction, which results in neural excitation near non-centre contacts. (II) Current focusing only produces spatially restricted excitation patterns when there is little or no excitation occurring in the peripheral processes, either because of geometrical factors or due to neural degeneration. (III) The model predicts that neural recruitment with electrical stimulation is a three-dimensional process; regions of excitation not only expand in apical and basal directions, but also by penetrating deeper into the spiral ganglion. (IV) At equal loudness certain differences between the spatial excitation patterns of various multipoles cannot be simulated in a model containing linearly aligned neurons of identical morphology. Introducing a form of variability in the neurons, such as the spatial distribution of cell bodies in the SG used in this study, is therefore essential in the modelling of spread of excitation.
    Hearing Research 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Bone conduction (BC) hearing relies on sound vibration transmission in the skull bone. Several clinical findings indicate that in the human, the skull vibration of the inner ear dominates the response for BC sound. Two phenomena transform the vibrations of the skull surrounding the inner ear to an excitation of the basilar membrane, (1) inertia of the inner ear fluid and (2) compression and expansion of the inner ear space. The relative importance of these two contributors were investigated using an impedance lumped element model. By dividing the motion of the inner ear boundary in common and differential motion it was found that the common motion dominated at frequencies below 7 kHz but above this frequency differential motion was greatest. When these motions were used to excite the model it was found that for the normal ear, the fluid inertia response was up to 20 dB greater than the compression response. This changed in the pathological ear where, for example, otosclerosis of the stapes depressed the fluid inertia response and improved the compression response so that inner ear compression dominated BC hearing at frequencies above 400 Hz. The model was also able to predict experimental and clinical findings of BC sensitivity in the literature, for example the so called Carhart notch in otosclerosis, increased BC sensitivity in superior semicircular canal dehiscence, and altered BC sensitivity following a vestibular fenestration and RW atresia.
    Hearing Research 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: On September 10th 2013, the clinical medical research Lasker award winners were rewarded for their work on multichannel cochlear implant. It has been my pleasure to see that such a major topic had caught the attention of the Members of the Jury for this prestigious award. That is why I accepted an invitation to participate in a special issue of Hearing Research devoted to the three winners. Here I highlight four scientific contributions made by the French team in late 1970s and early 1980s to modern multichannel cochlear implant development. 1) Chouard and MacLeod plotted an approximate frequency map of the whole length of the human cochlea, including its "hidden face" corresponding to speech frequencies. Moreover MacLeod suggested a sequential display of electrical stimulation as a function of each electrode, a precursor to today's electrodogram and interleaved stimulation. 2) Chouard performed total cochlear implantation in a deaf adult male with 8 electrically independent electrodes that were evenly distributed along the cochlea. 3) Chouard and MacLeod described in a patent detailed sound signal processing for a functional multichannel cochlear implant and reported speech discrimination without help of lip reading in some totally deafened patients. 4) Chouard experimentally demonstrated in the guinea pig the advantage of early cochlear implantation in treating profound neonatal deafness. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled . Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
    Hearing Research 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Envelope following responses (EFRs) elicited by stimuli of opposite polarities are often averaged due to their insensitivity to polarity when elicited by amplitude modulated tones. A recent report illustrates that individuals exhibit varying degrees of polarity-sensitive differences in EFR amplitude when elicited by vowel stimuli (Aiken and Purcell, 2013). The aims of the current study were to evaluate the incidence and degree of polarity-sensitive differences in EFRs recorded in a large group of individuals, and to examine potential factors influencing the polarity-sensitive nature of EFRs. In Experiment I of the present study, we evaluated the incidence and degree of polarity-sensitive differences in EFR amplitude in a group of 39 participants. EFRs were elicited by opposite polarities of the vowel/ε/in a natural/hVd/context presented at 80 dB SPL. Nearly 30% of the participants with detectable responses (n = 24) showed a difference of greater than ∼39 nV in EFR response amplitude between the two polarities, that was unexplained by variations in noise estimates. In Experiment II, we evaluated the effect of vowel, frequency of harmonics and presence of the first harmonic (h1) on the polarity sensitivity of EFRs in 20 participants with normal hearing. For vowels/u/,/a/and/i/, EFRs were elicited by two simultaneously presented carriers representing the first formant (resolved harmonics), and the second and higher formants (unresolved harmonics). Individual but simultaneous EFRs were elicited by the formant carriers by separating the fundamental frequency in the two carriers by 8 Hz. Vowels were presented as part of a naturally produced, but modified sequence/susaʃi/, at an overall level of 65 dB SPL. To evaluate the effect of h1 on polarity sensitivity of EFRs, EFRs were elicited by the same vowels without h1 in an identical sequence. A repeated measures analysis of variance indicated a significant effect of polarity on EFR amplitudes for the vowel/u/and a near-significant effect for/i/, when h1 was present. EFRs elicited by unresolved harmonics and resolved harmonics without h1 demonstrated no significant differences in amplitude due to polarity. The results suggest that h1 contributes to the polarity sensitivity of EFRs elicited by low frequency F1 carriers. However, it is unlikely that this is only due to the influence of a polarity-sensitive frequency-following response to the fine structure at h1. Removing h1 by filtering also decreased the asymmetry of the vowel envelope, especially for those with low first formant frequencies. A measure called the envelope asymmetry index was computed to evaluate the relationship between stimulus envelope asymmetry above and below the baseline, and polarity-sensitive differences in EFR amplitude. A significant positive correlation between envelope asymmetry index and absolute amplitude differences in EFR due to polarity suggests that one of the causes contributing to the polarity sensitivity of EFRs could be the asymmetry in stimulus envelope. This stimulus characteristic, however, explains only a fraction of the variability observed and there may be other factors that contribute to individual differences in polarity sensitivity of the EFR to naturally produced vowel stimuli.
    Hearing Research 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The challenge in getting a decent signal to the brain for users of cochlear implants (CIs) is described. A breakthrough occurred in 1989 that later enabled most users to understand conversational speech with their restored hearing alone. Subsequent developments included stimulation in addition to that provided with a unilateral CI, either with electrical stimulation on both sides or with acoustic stimulation in combination with a unilateral CI, the latter for persons with residual hearing at low frequencies in either or both ears. Both types of adjunctive stimulation produced further improvements in performance for substantial fractions of patients. Today, the CI and related hearing prostheses are the standard of care for profoundly deaf persons and ever-increasing indications are now allowing persons with less severe losses to benefit from these marvelous technologies. The steps in achieving the present levels of performance are traced, and some possibilities for further improvements are mentioned. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.
    Hearing Research 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: CaV2.1 Ca2+ channels play a key role in triggering neurotransmitter release and mediating synaptic transmission. Familial hemiplegic migraine type-1 (FHM-1) is caused by missense mutations in the CACNA1A gene that encodes the α1A pore-forming subunit of CaV2.1 Ca2+ channels. We used knock-in (KI) transgenic mice harbouring the pathogenic FHM-1 mutation R192Q to study inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmission in the principle neurons of the lateral superior olive (LSO) in the auditory brainstem. We tested if the R192Q FHM-1 mutation differentially affects excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission, disturbing the normal balance between excitation and inhibition in this nucleus. Whole cell patch-clamp was used to measure neurotransmitter elicited excitatory (EPSCs) and inhibitory (IPSCs) postsynaptic currents in wild-type (WT) and R192Q KI mice. Our results showed that the FHM-1 mutation in CaV2.1 channels has multiple effects. Evoked EPSC amplitudes were smaller whereas evoked and miniature IPSC amplitudes were larger in R192Q KI compared to WT mice. In addition, in R192Q KI mice, the release probability was enhanced compared to WT, at both inhibitory (0.53 ± 0.02 vs. 0.44 ± 0.01, P = 2.10−5, Student's t-test) and excitatory synapses (0.60 ± 0.03 vs. 0.45 ± 0.02, P = 4 10−6, Student's t-test). Vesicle pool size was diminished in R192Q KI mice compared to WT mice (68 ± 6 vs 91 ± 7, P = 0.008, inhibitory; 104 ± 13 vs 335 ± 30, P = 10−6, excitatory, Student's t-test). R192Q KI mice present enhanced short-term plasticity. Repetitive stimulation of the afferent axons caused short-term depression (STD) of E/IPSCs that recovered significantly faster in R192Q KI mice compared to WT. This supports the hypothesis of a gain-of-function of the CaV2.1 channels in R192Q KI mice, which alters the balance of excitatory/inhibitory inputs and could also have implications in the altered cortical excitability responsible for FHM pathology.
    Hearing Research 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Early multi-channel designs in the history of cochlear implant development were based on a vocoder-type processing of frequency channels and presented bands of compressed analog stimulus waveforms simultaneously on multiple tonotopically arranged electrodes. The realization that the direct summation of electrical fields as a result of simultaneous electrode stimulation exacerbates interactions among the stimulation channels and limits cochlear implant outcome led to the breakthrough in the development of cochlear implants, the continuous interleaved (CIS) sampling coding strategy. By interleaving stimulation pulses across electrodes, CIS activates only a single electrode at each point in time, preventing a direct summation of electrical fields and hence the primary component of channel interactions. In this paper we show that a previously presented approach of simultaneous stimulation with channel interaction compensation (CIC) may also ameliorate the deleterious effects of simultaneous channel interaction on speech perception. In an acute study conducted in eleven experienced MED-EL implant users, configurations involving simultaneous stimulation with CIC and doubled pulse phase durations have been investigated. As pairs of electrodes were activated simultaneously and pulse durations were doubled, carrier rates remained the same. Comparison conditions involved both CIS and fine structure (FS) strategies, either with strictly sequential or paired-simultaneous stimulation. Results showed no statistical difference in the perception of sentences in noise and monosyllables for sequential and paired-simultaneous stimulation with doubled phase durations. This suggests that CIC can largely compensate for the effects of simultaneous channel interaction, for both CIS and FS coding strategies. A simultaneous stimulation paradigm has a number of potential advantages over a traditional sequential interleaved design. The flexibility gained when dropping the requirement of interleaving pulses across electrodes may be instrumental in designing coding strategies for a more accurate transmission of stimulus features such as temporal fine structure or interaural time delays to the auditory nerve. Also, longer pulse phase durations may be implemented while maintaining relatively high stimulation pulse rates. Utilizing longer pulse durations may relax requirements on implant compliance and facilitate the design of more energy-efficient implant receivers for a longer battery lifetime or a reduction in implant size. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
    Hearing Research 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Adults with unilateral hearing loss often demonstrate decreased sound localization ability and report that situations requiring spatial hearing are especially challenging. Few studies have evaluated localization abilities combined with training in this population. The present pilot study examined whether localization of two sound types would improve after training, and explored the relation between localization ability or training benefit and demographic factors. Eleven participants with unilateral severe to profound hearing loss attended five training sessions; localization cues gradually decreased across sessions. Localization ability was assessed pre- and post-training. Assessment stimuli were monosyllabic words and spectral and temporal random spectrogram sounds. Root mean square errors for each participant and stimulus type were used in group and correlation analyses; individual data were examined with ordinary least squares regression. Mean pre-to post-training test results were significantly different for all stimulus types. Among the participants, eight significantly improved following training on at least one localization measure, whereas three did not. Participants with the poorest localization ability improved the most and likewise, those with the best pre-training ability showed the least training benefit. Correlation results suggested that test age, age at onset of severe to profound hearing loss and better ear high frequency audibility may contribute to localization ability. Results support the need for continued investigation of localization training efficacy and consideration of localization training within rehabilitation protocols for individuals with unilateral severe to profound hearing loss. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
    Hearing Research 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The House Ear Institute (HEI) had a long and distinguished history of auditory implant innovation and development. Early clinical innovations include being one of the first cochlear implant (CI) centers, being the first center to implant a child with a cochlear implant in the US, developing the auditory brainstem implant, and developing multiple surgical approaches and tools for Otology. This paper reviews the second stage of auditory implant research at House – in-depth basic research on perceptual capabilities and signal processing for both cochlear implants and auditory brainstem implants. Psychophysical studies characterized the loudness and temporal perceptual properties of electrical stimulation as a function of electrical parameters. Speech studies with the noise-band vocoder showed that only four bands of tonotopically arrayed information were sufficient for speech recognition, and that most implant users were receiving the equivalent of 8–10 bands of information. The noise-band vocoder allowed us to evaluate the effects of the manipulation of the number of bands, the alignment of the bands with the original tonotopic map, and distortions in the tonotopic mapping, including holes in the neural representation. Stimulation pulse rate was shown to have only a small effect on speech recognition. Electric fields were manipulated in position and sharpness, showing the potential benefit of improved tonotopic selectivity. Auditory training shows great promise for improving speech recognition for all patients. And the Auditory Brainstem Implant was developed and improved and its application expanded to new populations. Overall, the last 25 years of research at HEI helped increase the basic scientific understanding of electrical stimulation of hearing and contributed to the improved outcomes for patients with the CI and ABI devices.This article is part of a Special Issue entitled .
    Hearing Research 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Summarize differences between peripheral and central response measures to electrical stimulation.•Observe variations in both peripheral and central responses among individual cochlear implant users.•Interpret these variations as evidence of differences between both peripheral stimulation as well as central processing.•Combined measures may be particularly informative in clinical situations.
    Hearing Research 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: We study how humans adapt to spectrally degraded, frequency shifted auditory input.•Imposing the frequency shift in gradual small steps makes speech perception improve faster.•The gradual approach also results in better generalization to understand the speech of novel talkers.
    Hearing Research 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Shear layer Young's modulus of 16 Pa is predicted matching other work.•Experimental data used in high fidelity finite element model.•Geometrically accurate finite element models provide most accurate prediction.•FEA model natural frequency (363 Hz) matches experimental measured values (363 Hz).•Hair bundle contribution to shear layer stiffness is predicted to be 45–47% of the total.•Otolithic organs are accelerometers, not seismometers.
    Hearing Research 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Influence of auditory attention on medial olivocochlear (MOC) activity was studied.•Focusing attention enhanced MOC inhibition for adults but not for children.•Attentional modulation of MOC activity in children was immature.
    Hearing Research 10/2014;