Journal of the American College of Emergency Physicians (JACEP )

Publisher: American College of Emergency Physicians; University Association for Emergency Medical Services, Elsevier

Description

Discontinued in 1979. Continued as Annals of Emergency Medicine (0196-0644).

  • Impact factor
    0.00
  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
    0.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.00
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.00
  • Website
    Journal of the American College of Emergency Physicians website
  • Other titles
    JACEP, Journal of the American College of Emergency Physicians
  • ISSN
    0361-1124
  • OCLC
    1783917
  • Material type
    Periodical
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Elsevier

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Voluntary deposit by author of pre-print allowed on Institutions open scholarly website and pre-print servers
    • Voluntary deposit by author of authors post-print allowed on institutions open scholarly website including Institutional Repository
    • Deposit due to Funding Body, Institutional and Governmental mandate only allowed where separate agreement between repository and publisher exists
    • Set statement to accompany deposit
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to journal home page or articles' DOI
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Articles in some journals can be made Open Access on payment of additional charge
    • NIH Authors articles will be submitted to PMC after 12 months
    • Authors who are required to deposit in subject repositories may also use Sponsorship Option
    • Pre-print can not be deposited for The Lancet
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • Journal of the American College of Emergency Physicians 01/1980; 8(12):545-6.
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    ABSTRACT: We used the external rotation method for reducing anterior shoulder dislocations on 85 consecutive patients seen in our emergency department during a one-year period. In relatively inexperienced hands, the external rotation method was successful on first attempt in 80% of cases. There were no complications attributable to the technique itself. We feel that it is a successful, easy, and atraumatic method of achieving reduction in both first occurrence and recurrent anterior shoulder dislocations.
    Journal of the American College of Emergency Physicians 01/1980;
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    ABSTRACT: Although emergency department observation-holding units have been shown to be effective in limiting hospitalizations and improving the accuracy of disposition, the possibility of adverse outcome following discharge from such units has not been addressed. To establish the safety of the unit, a five-month prospective study of all patients admitted to this area was carried out and included long-term follow-up. There were 442 patients admitted. Of these, 78% were discharged improved. Complications in the unit were minimal and there were no deaths. Long-term follow-up revealed four deaths (1%) and four patients (1%) who had complicated hospitalizations. Diagnosis, age, patient condition, and time of admission to the unit were predictive of the need for inpatient hospitalization. We conclude that the observation-holding unit, with appropriate supervision, represents a safe alternative disposition for selected emergency patients.
    Journal of the American College of Emergency Physicians 01/1980; 8(12):508-12.
  • Journal of the American College of Emergency Physicians 01/1980; 8(12):532-41.
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    ABSTRACT: Quantitative aspects of various methods of warming are presented comparing the peripheral method of warm bath immersion to the central method of ventilation with heated water-saturated air, infusion of warmed intravenous solutions, peritoneal lavage with warmed solutions, and hemodialysis or cardiopulmonary bypass. The need to convert arterial blood gas results for body temperature is emphasized. Two cases demonstrate combined use of peripheral warming using warming mattress and blankets and central warming with ventilation and infusion.
    Journal of the American College of Emergency Physicians 01/1980; 8(12):523-7.
  • Journal of the American College of Emergency Physicians 01/1980; 8(12):544-5.
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    ABSTRACT: In 1977 the Department of Anesthesiology of the Medical College of Virginia coordinated a compulsory 72-hour course for first-year medical students fulfilling all requirements of the Department of Transportation and leading to eligibility for certification of the medical student as an Emergency Medical Technician (EMT-A). We describe the methodology and content of this course, as well as problems encountered and lessons learned. This sound foundation in emergency care concepts will enable the medical student to develop greater competence in critical skills during the clinical years.
    Journal of the American College of Emergency Physicians 01/1980; 8(12):513-4.
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    ABSTRACT: Strychnine intoxication is manifested by agitation, muscle spasms, and convulsions. We report a case in which intractable convulsions led to severe lactic acidosis which secondarily resulted in visceral (lung, heart, kidney, liver, and brain) collapse and death. Aggressive therapy instituted in the emergency department and aimed at control of seizure activity and lactic acidosis may be lifesaving.
    Journal of the American College of Emergency Physicians 01/1980; 8(12):520-2.
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    ABSTRACT: Ninety-one patients with cervical injuries treated at the Geisinger Medical Center Emergency Department were reviewed. Most injuries were bony injuries with no evidence of cord injury. Of the 43 cases with cord injury, 56% had partial cord injuries and 44% had complete cord injuries. Clinical presentations of these patients were reviewed. A basic outline of management is discussed.
    Journal of the American College of Emergency Physicians 01/1980; 8(12):504-7.
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    ABSTRACT: This study was undertaken to determine if epinephrine administered endotracheally is as effective in treating anaphylactic shock as is intravenously administered epinephrine. An animal model of anaphylactic shock was produced in anesthetized dogs by the intravenous administration of histamine phosphate. Both the endotracheal and intravenous routes of epinephrine administration resulted in efficient and effective reversal of histamine-induced hypotension. At the doses employed, the intravenous administration of epinephrine resulted in the production of significantly (p less than 0.05) greater numbers of ventricular cardiac arrhythmias than did the endotracheal route of administration.
    Journal of the American College of Emergency Physicians 01/1980; 8(12):500-3.
  • Journal of the American College of Emergency Physicians 01/1980; 8(12):542.
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    ABSTRACT: The endotracheal route for the administration of epinephrine has been studied extensively in dogs. There has been little in the medical literature to document the successful use of this technique in humans. The successful use of endotracheally administered epinephrine in two patients with cardiorespiratory collapse is reported. Specific points concerning endotracheal drugs are discussed and a set of guidelines for clinical use is offered.
    Journal of the American College of Emergency Physicians 01/1980; 8(12):515-9.
  • Journal of the American College of Emergency Physicians 01/1980; 8(12):544.
  • Journal of the American College of Emergency Physicians 12/1979; 8(12):542.
  • Journal of the American College of Emergency Physicians 12/1979; 8(12):549–550.
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    ABSTRACT: Prompt blood-gas analysis consisting of pH, PCO2, and PO2 is now almost universally accessible. PCO2 directly conveys the role of the respiratory mechanism in any acid-base disturbance. The metabolic condition, however, is hidden in a relationship between pH and PCO2 that is most faithfully expressed by the cumbersome Henderson-Hasselbalch equation (HHE). Two methods of quickly determining metabolic status from pH and PCO2, without resorting to the HHE, are discussed. The first method is well known and adjusts pH to represent only metabolic state by quantitatively cancelling the influence of hyper- or hypoventilation. The second method, not previously reported, uses measured pH to estimate the ratio [HCO3-]/PCO2, which, when multiplied by PCO2, equals bicarbonate ion concentration.
    Journal of the American College of Emergency Physicians 12/1979; 8(11):462-6.
  • Journal of the American College of Emergency Physicians 12/1979; 8(12):546.
  • Journal of the American College of Emergency Physicians 12/1979; 8(11):485-9.
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    ABSTRACT: Suicide attempts using hypoglycemic agents are uncommon but are associated with a high level of morbidity and mortality. Their recognition is sometimes difficult and the duration of hypoglycemic effect is often prolonged. Two cases that illustrate the difficulties encountered in recognition and therapy are described. Effective therapy depends on adequate glucose supplementation to maintain euglycemia. Therapeutic intervention often must be maintained for several days. Glucocorticoids may be useful in difficult cases. Other modes of therapy, including glucagon, are unproven or controversial.
    Journal of the American College of Emergency Physicians 12/1979; 8(11):467-70.
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    ABSTRACT: Dystonic reactions induced by phenothiazines are not uncommon, yet rapid relief of symptoms is still often delayed. We think that a test dose of diphenhydramine should be given for its diagnostic and therapeutic efficacy when phenothiazine-induced dystonic reactions are suspected. Differential diagnostic testing should then proceed. We present three typical cases and discuss the therapy and diagnosis.
    Journal of the American College of Emergency Physicians 12/1979; 8(11):471-2.

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