British Journal of Guidance and Counselling (BRIT J GUID COUNS )

Publisher: Careers Research and Advisory Centre (Cambridge, England), Taylor & Francis

Description

British Journal of Guidance & Counselling is the leading forum for debate between academics, trainers and practitioners in the field, publishing high-quality, international contributions in the following areas: the theory and practice of guidance and counselling the provision of guidance and counselling services training and professional issues Theoretical and empirical studies relating to the practice of guidance and counselling are reported, drawing on a variety of disciplines, encompassing both quantitative and qualitative methodologies, and ranging in scope from large-scale surveys to individual case-studies. The journal also explores the links between various areas of guidance and counselling and their relationship to such cognate fields as education, psychotherapy and social work. In addition to regular papers, the journal features special articles under the headings 'A Personal View', 'Interview', 'In Practice' and 'Debate', along with book reviews and frequent Symposia focusing on areas of particular interest. British Journal of Guidance & Counselling is published on behalf of the Careers Research and Advisory Centre.

  • Impact factor
    0.75
  • 5-year impact
    0.75
  • Cited half-life
    7.50
  • Immediacy index
    0.18
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.23
  • Website
    British Journal of Guidance and Counselling website
  • Other titles
    British journal of guidance & counselling (Online), British journal of guidance and counselling, British journal of guidance and counseling
  • ISSN
    0306-9885
  • OCLC
    43770214
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 12 month embargo for STM, Behavioural Science and Public Health Journals
    • 18 month embargo for SSH journals
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • Pre-print on authors own website, Institutional or Subject Repository
    • Post-print on authors own website, Institutional or Subject Repository
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • Publisher will deposit to PMC on behalf of NIH authors.
    • STM: Science, Technology and Medicine
    • SSH: Social Science and Humanities
    • 'Taylor & Francis (Psychology Press)' is an imprint of 'Taylor & Francis'
  • Classification
    ​ yellow

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Balanced assessment of mental health involves assessing well-being and strengths as well as psychopathology. The character strengths of curiosity, gratitude, hope, optimism and forgiveness are assessed in 214 new undergraduates and their relationships to mental health, subjective well-being and self-esteem explored. Scoring the mental health scale for psychiatric caseness, case and non-case students did not differ in character strengths, positive affect or life satisfaction, supporting a dual-factor model. Hope pathways and gratitude predicted mental health. Gratitude, hope agency and exploratory curiosity predicted positive affect. Gratitude and hope agency predicted life satisfaction. Hope agency, hope pathways, exploratory curiosity and gratitude predicted self-esteem, with absorption curiosity as a negative predictor. The benefits of assessing strengths are discussed and interventions designed to develop them.
    British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 05/2014; 42(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study aimed at investigating the intercorrelation among affective, cognitive and behavioural components on procrastination. A total of 402 undergraduate students (115 males, 286 females, 1 not indicated) participated in the study. Students completed the General Procrastination Scale, Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale, Frost Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale and Self-regulation Inventory. A constructed hypothesised model was tested by utilising path analysis. Overall, the analysis indicated that the model sufficiently explained the data. The findings showed the multicorrelation among the variables, ranging from 14 to 58. Squared multiple correlation coefficients (R 2) of procrastination revealed that endogenous and mediator variables explained 33% of the total variance in procrastination. The results demonstrated the importance of affect, cognition and behaviour on problematic delay referred to as procrastination.
    British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 05/2014; 42(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Hope has long been identified as an important therapeutic factor in counselling. Further, research evidence for the importance of hope to counselling practice and outcome is abundant. However, the field is only beginning to explicitly consider how hope can be effectively and intentionally practised. One of the most challenging dilemmas encountered by counsellors committed to working with this important therapeutic factor is that of so-called unrealistic hope. In this paper, we outline two real-life counselling vignettes illustrating unrealistic hope, and consider these scenarios alongside relevant scholarship and practice experience. Guiding principles and practices for conceptualising and working with unrealistic hope are offered as a means of beginning the conversation about this complex aspect of working with client hope.
    British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 05/2014; 42(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Structural explanations of career choice and development are well established. Socioeconomic inequality represents a powerful factor shaping career trajectories and economic outcomes achieved by individuals. However, a robust and growing body of evidence demonstrates a strong link between socioeconomic inequality and health outcomes. Work is a key factor explaining differences in income and lifestyle. It seems unavoidable that inequality in careers has profound consequences for health and well-being, but this relationship is largely ignored by career scholars. Some implications of health inequality for career guidance interventions are suggested.
    British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 05/2014; 42(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Other than through personal reflection and anecdotal evidence, I have had little opportunity to explore the influence of my visual impairment upon my therapeutic relationships. In order to address this, I conducted three research conversations with former clients (participants), each of whom had expressed an interest in participating in the research. Potential participants also had to meet the inclusion criteria for the research and provide informed consent prior to their participation. Research conversations were conducted between March and July 2009 and were analysed qualitatively, using a method informed by Moustakas's heuristic inquiry. Participants demonstrated idiosyncratic responses to my visual impairment; their perception of their responses to my visual impairment sometimes differed from mine. Feelings identified included uncertainty, disappointment and relief. My visual impairment appeared to influence the therapeutic relationship in a variety of ways, including resonance with the inner world significance of disability to the participant and interaction with my personal process. While not the therapeutic agent, my visual impairment had the potential to act as a catalyst in therapeutic change. The potential for me to either under-estimate or over-estimate the significance of my visual impairment highlights the need for continued self-awareness and the maintenance of an open and non-defensive attitude.
    British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 05/2014; 42(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Teacher–child relationship building (TCRB) is a play-based professional development programme adapted from kinder training and filial therapy. Intended for early education teachers and students, TCRB is designed to strengthen the teacher–child relationship, improve student behaviour, enhance academic involvement and develop teachers' classroom management skills. In the current study, we utilised a phenomenological approach to examine teachers' perceptions of the initial implementation of TCRB through identifying individual and collective perspectives in the summation of themes. Findings indicated that the teachers perceived the TCRB model to be informative, well organised, appropriately structured and effective in enhancing teacher–child relationships, improving classroom management skills and reducing behavioural problems among child participants. Limitations of the study, implications and suggestions for future research are discussed.
    British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 05/2014; 42(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of the present study was to compare the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioural (CBT) and psychodynamic (PDT) therapies in the treatment of anxiety among university students. To this aim, the Symptom Questionnaire (SQ) was completed by 30 students assigned to CBT and by 24 students assigned to PDT, both at the beginning and at the end of treatment. The main problem presented by all patients was anxiety. Except for one sub-scale, we observed significant differences in the scores of all sub-scales and scales of SQ, with lower scores at the end of the therapy, indicating lower distress, regardless of the type of treatment. The present findings suggest that both therapies are effective in the treatment of anxiety among university students.
    British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 05/2014; 42(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper proposes incorporating the concept of the ‘observing eye/I’, from cognitive analytic therapy (CAT), to Hawkins and Shohet's seven modes of supervision, comprising their transtheoretical model of supervision. Each mode is described alongside explicit examples relating to CAT. This modification using a key idea from CAT (in the form of the addition of a Mode 8 ‘observing us’) enhances the model's utility in supervisory practice. With this adaptation, the model could also be used, with greater breadth and depth, in therapies where the primary focus is not relational. The collaboratively reflexive ‘observing us’ ensures that the very process of supervision is effectively monitored and attended to. The inclusion of this eighth level leads to more formal emphasis on the meta communication and meta commentary levels in supervision.
    British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 05/2014; 42(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study aimed at investigating the intercorrelation among affective, cognitive and behavioural components on procrastination. A total of 402 undergraduate students (115 males, 286 females, 1 not indicated) participated in the study. Students completed the General Procrastination Scale, Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale, Frost Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale and Self-regulation Inventory. A constructed hypothesised model was tested by utilising path analysis. Overall, the analysis indicated that the model sufficiently explained the data. The findings showed the multicorrelation among the variables, ranging from 14 to 58. Squared multiple correlation coefficients (R2) of procrastination revealed that endogenous and mediator variables explained 33% of the total variance in procrastination. The results demonstrated the importance of affect, cognition and behaviour on problematic delay referred to as procrastination.
    British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 03/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate secondary trauma and job burnout and associated factors in a sample of 71 HIV lay counsellors in South Africa. Results indicate that 49.5% were not satisfied with their work environment and 51.4% were potentially secondary traumatic stress cases. In univariate analysis, seeing more HIV counselling and testing clients, being HIV positive and a higher number of lifetime traumas was associated with secondary trauma, while in multivariable analysis only the higher number of lifetime traumas was associated with secondary trauma. In both univariate and multivariable analysis, seeing more HIV counselling and testing clients and a higher number of lifetime traumas were associated with job burnout.
    British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 01/2014; 42(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article reports on the value of career construction counselling (CCC) with a gay person. The participant was selected purposively, with the selection criteria calling for a mid-career woman who had sought career counselling. The intervention involved administration of the Career Construction Interview (CCI) and the creation of a life portrait. A case study design (working with a participant in a one-on-one research setting and incorporating a qualitative, interpretive paradigm) was implemented. The CCI (including the three early recollections technique) was administered to gather qualitative data, and Savickas' eight-step strategy was followed to complete the participant's life portrait. After the intervention, the participant demonstrated an enhanced sense of self as well as an increased sense of personal authorship. CCC can thus meet the career counselling needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered people, and, possibly, also of members of other minority groups.
    British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 01/2014; 42(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Against a backdrop of social struggles to rebalance power between colonisers and indigenous peoples, counsellor education at a university in Aotearoa New Zealand is undergoing a transformation. This article explores the creation and application of a framework that results from listening to the voices of indigenous peoples and counselling stakeholders. What is created is a form of bicultural pluralism – bicultural because the indigenous and coloniser have worked together to build cultural bridges, and pluralistic because the framework can be applied to all cultural groups equally. Our goal is to advance community wellness by increasing the capacity of counsellors to work effectively and cross-culturally, thus extending the health resource they can provide to the whole nation.
    British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 01/2014; 42(1).
  • British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 01/2014; 42(1).
  • British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 01/2014; 42(4).
  • British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 01/2014; 42(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The current study investigates how attitudes towards seeking psychological help relate to internal working models of attachment (self-model and other-model) and ruminative tendencies. The study includes 589 Turkish university students (278 females, 308 males and 3 unknown) by implementing a convenient sampling procedure. The average age of the participants was 22.4 years (SD = 2.2). Participants were administered the Attitudes toward Seeking Psychological Help-Short, the Relationship Questionnaire and the Rumination Scale. The results of the study indicate that the other-model and rumination have a relationship to women's help-seeking attitudes whereas the self-model has a relationship to men's help-seeking attitudes. The results are discussed in light of the related literature.
    British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 01/2014; 42(1).
  • British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 01/2014; 42(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article reports the findings of a qualitative study into the experience of person-centred training from the viewpoint of the trainer. Interpretative phenomenological analysis was the adopted approach. The researcher conducted a series of in-depth semi-structured interviews with five person-centred trainers with experience across a range of settings. The findings demonstrate the commitment of person-centred trainers to a relational approach with the facilitation of individual potential at its heart. The intrinsically rewarding nature of the role is highlighted alongside its substantial demands. Participants demonstrated a primary identification with themselves as counsellor trainers rather than academics and some lack of reconciliation with current developments within counselling.
    British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 01/2014; 42(2).
  • British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 01/2014; 42(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We propose that writing can be employed to foster the kind of career learning required in the twenty-first century. The article offers insights into how writing exercises and approaches can be applied to help students construct their career stories in a way that allows them to engage in a dialogical learning process and work in a self-directed way. Creative, expressive and reflective writing practices are described and parallels are drawn between these and existing practices and theories in narrative career counselling. Key exercises in graduate courses for writing for personal development are discussed and a theoretical explanation is given as to why a particular order of approaches and exercises works best to promote career learning.
    British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 01/2014; 42(1).

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