British Journal of Guidance and Counselling (BRIT J GUID COUNS )

Publisher: Careers Research and Advisory Centre (Cambridge, England), Taylor & Francis

Description

British Journal of Guidance & Counselling is the leading forum for debate between academics, trainers and practitioners in the field, publishing high-quality, international contributions in the following areas: the theory and practice of guidance and counselling the provision of guidance and counselling services training and professional issues Theoretical and empirical studies relating to the practice of guidance and counselling are reported, drawing on a variety of disciplines, encompassing both quantitative and qualitative methodologies, and ranging in scope from large-scale surveys to individual case-studies. The journal also explores the links between various areas of guidance and counselling and their relationship to such cognate fields as education, psychotherapy and social work. In addition to regular papers, the journal features special articles under the headings 'A Personal View', 'Interview', 'In Practice' and 'Debate', along with book reviews and frequent Symposia focusing on areas of particular interest. British Journal of Guidance & Counselling is published on behalf of the Careers Research and Advisory Centre.

  • Impact factor
    0.75
  • 5-year impact
    0.75
  • Cited half-life
    7.50
  • Immediacy index
    0.18
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.23
  • Website
    British Journal of Guidance and Counselling website
  • Other titles
    British journal of guidance & counselling (Online), British journal of guidance and counselling, British journal of guidance and counseling
  • ISSN
    0306-9885
  • OCLC
    43770214
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • On author's personal website or departmental website immediately
    • On institutional repository or subject-based repository after either 12 months embargo for STM, Behavioural Science and Public Health Journals or 18 months embargo for SSH journals
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • The publisher will deposit in on behalf of authors to a designated institutional repository including PubMed Central, where a deposit agreement exists with the repository
    • STM: Science, Technology and Medicine
    • SSH: Social Science and Humanities
    • Publisher last contacted on 25/03/2014
    • 'Taylor & Francis (Psychology Press)' is an imprint of 'Taylor & Francis'
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This positional paper originates from our need as researcher/practitioners to establish a meaningful epistemological framework for research into bereaved people's journey through loss and grief over time. We describe how the field of grief research has a long and established biological basis, in keeping with a positivist epistemology. However, there has been a diminution of the influence of logical positivism in twenty-first-century counselling research. We argue that in grief counselling research, naturalistic observation of the grieving process within a logical positivist paradigm, remains a valid and valuable construct. We posit an observational protocol for the grief counselling process which minimises the intrusion of research method into the therapeutic process. We offer this as a means of conducting qualitative research within a bereavement counselling service. Further, we suggest that the development of an observational protocol for a client's grieving process has potential implications for developing good practice in grief work.
    British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 10/2014; 42(5).
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    ABSTRACT: This study sought to explore the impact of ending therapy on counsellors working with children in schools. Five counsellors were interviewed and their responses were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Four master themes emerged, one of which, empathic identification, is the focus of this paper. The findings of this study suggest that the counsellor's experience of ending therapy can evoke long-term powerful emotions.
    British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 10/2014; 42(5).
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    ABSTRACT: This study explores how adolescent clients construct the purpose and outcome of counselling. A narrative analysis was performed on interviews with 22 clients (aged 16–18) who had used a school-based counselling service. The aim was to identify the purpose and outcomes that participants attributed to their counselling experience. The analysis identified four narrative forms that young clients used to describe counselling. These included ‘transformative’, ‘supportive’, ‘pragmatic’ and ‘disappointed’ narratives. Each narrative form constructed a different purpose and outcome for counselling. Engaging with clients' narratives about the purpose and intended outcome of counselling may allow counsellors to better match their expectations and approach to fit with their young client or to work with them to co-construct more flexible narratives that support helpful outcomes.
    British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 10/2014; 42(5).
  • British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 10/2014; 42(5).
  • British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 10/2014; 42(5).
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    ABSTRACT: Moving to a new country is often seen as a disturbing event in sojourners' lives. Several models of adjustment postulate that the first phase of the sojourn is either categorised by euphoria or anxiety. Using a case study of three Indian Postgraduate students, this paper investigates whether the beginning phase of these sojourners was euphoric or anxious in nature. The findings revealed that they had varied experiences and even mixed experiences that were both pleasant and/or unpleasant which were in turn determined by their individual differences and personal experiences. Another salient finding of this study was that the psychological side of the sojourn starts much before the students have even first set foot in the UK. This could serve as a basis for further research and to conceptualise a model of cultural adjustment that takes into account the impact of the pre-arrival phase on the overall sojourn experience.
    British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 10/2014; 42(5).
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    ABSTRACT: This paper presents an abbreviated version of a verbatim script developed from oral history interviews with individuals key to the development of counselling and psychotherapy in Scotland from 1960 to 2000. Earlier versions were used in workshops with counsellors and pastoral care practitioners to share counter-narratives of counselling and to provide opportunities for conversations about historical and contemporary relationships between faith, spirituality, counselling and psychotherapy. By presenting intertwined histories in a readers' theatre script, the narrative nature of lives lived in context was respected. By bringing oral histories into virtual dialogue with each other and with contemporary practitioners, whether through workshops or through publications, the interplay between individual, institutional and societal narratives remains visible and open to change.
    British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 10/2014; 42(5):525-543.
  • British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 10/2014; 42(5).
  • British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 10/2014; 42(5).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The effect of psychological resilience as a buffer against anxiety was investigated in a sample of 39 boys with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder (ASD) via individual online questionnaire responses to standardised inventories for assessing anxiety and psychological resilience. Ability to handle problems, make good decisions, think before acting and help others were the most powerful buffers against Generalised Anxiety Disorder, while thinking before acting significantly buffered social phobia. Believing that they were able to handle problems was significantly associated with less emotional anxiety about school, work or social activities, being irritable, unable to relax and fatigue. As well as describing the pathways between the components of psychological resilience and anxiety, these findings also suggest several specific directions for training programmes aimed at equipping boys with an ASD with skills to cope more effectively with anxiety.
    British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 10/2014; 42(5).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study evaluates the impact of an intervention on business school graduates' employability comprising of a curriculum-based career management skills (CMS) module and an industrial placement year. The study uses data from the destinations of leavers of higher education survey to examine the employability of different groups within the cohort (no intervention, CMS module only and CMS module plus structured work experience). It finds that structured work experience has clear, positive effects on the ability of graduates to secure employment in ‘graduate level’ jobs within six months of graduation. Furthermore, participation in the CMS module also has a clear, positive effect upon the ability of participants to secure employment.
    British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 10/2014; 42(5).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article reports findings from a phenomenographic investigation into career practitioners' understanding of competency for social media in career services. Sixteen Danish and Finnish practitioners with experience using social media in career services were interviewed in focus groups. Competency for social media in career services was conceived as (i) an ability to use social media for delivering information, (ii) an ability to use social media for delivering career services, (iii) an ability to utilise social media for collaborative career exploration and (iv) an ability to utilise social media for co-careering. The findings can be used to develop pre-service and in-service training of career practitioners and support for the deepening of their competency, using the critical aspects that were identified.
    British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Balanced assessment of mental health involves assessing well-being and strengths as well as psychopathology. The character strengths of curiosity, gratitude, hope, optimism and forgiveness are assessed in 214 new undergraduates and their relationships to mental health, subjective well-being and self-esteem explored. Scoring the mental health scale for psychiatric caseness, case and non-case students did not differ in character strengths, positive affect or life satisfaction, supporting a dual-factor model. Hope pathways and gratitude predicted mental health. Gratitude, hope agency and exploratory curiosity predicted positive affect. Gratitude and hope agency predicted life satisfaction. Hope agency, hope pathways, exploratory curiosity and gratitude predicted self-esteem, with absorption curiosity as a negative predictor. The benefits of assessing strengths are discussed and interventions designed to develop them.
    British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 05/2014; 42(3).
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    ABSTRACT: This study aimed at investigating the intercorrelation among affective, cognitive and behavioural components on procrastination. A total of 402 undergraduate students (115 males, 286 females, 1 not indicated) participated in the study. Students completed the General Procrastination Scale, Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale, Frost Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale and Self-regulation Inventory. A constructed hypothesised model was tested by utilising path analysis. Overall, the analysis indicated that the model sufficiently explained the data. The findings showed the multicorrelation among the variables, ranging from 14 to 58. Squared multiple correlation coefficients (R 2) of procrastination revealed that endogenous and mediator variables explained 33% of the total variance in procrastination. The results demonstrated the importance of affect, cognition and behaviour on problematic delay referred to as procrastination.
    British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 05/2014; 42(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Teacher–child relationship building (TCRB) is a play-based professional development programme adapted from kinder training and filial therapy. Intended for early education teachers and students, TCRB is designed to strengthen the teacher–child relationship, improve student behaviour, enhance academic involvement and develop teachers' classroom management skills. In the current study, we utilised a phenomenological approach to examine teachers' perceptions of the initial implementation of TCRB through identifying individual and collective perspectives in the summation of themes. Findings indicated that the teachers perceived the TCRB model to be informative, well organised, appropriately structured and effective in enhancing teacher–child relationships, improving classroom management skills and reducing behavioural problems among child participants. Limitations of the study, implications and suggestions for future research are discussed.
    British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 05/2014; 42(3).
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    ABSTRACT: This paper proposes incorporating the concept of the ‘observing eye/I’, from cognitive analytic therapy (CAT), to Hawkins and Shohet's seven modes of supervision, comprising their transtheoretical model of supervision. Each mode is described alongside explicit examples relating to CAT. This modification using a key idea from CAT (in the form of the addition of a Mode 8 ‘observing us’) enhances the model's utility in supervisory practice. With this adaptation, the model could also be used, with greater breadth and depth, in therapies where the primary focus is not relational. The collaboratively reflexive ‘observing us’ ensures that the very process of supervision is effectively monitored and attended to. The inclusion of this eighth level leads to more formal emphasis on the meta communication and meta commentary levels in supervision.
    British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 05/2014; 42(3).
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    ABSTRACT: Hope has long been identified as an important therapeutic factor in counselling. Further, research evidence for the importance of hope to counselling practice and outcome is abundant. However, the field is only beginning to explicitly consider how hope can be effectively and intentionally practised. One of the most challenging dilemmas encountered by counsellors committed to working with this important therapeutic factor is that of so-called unrealistic hope. In this paper, we outline two real-life counselling vignettes illustrating unrealistic hope, and consider these scenarios alongside relevant scholarship and practice experience. Guiding principles and practices for conceptualising and working with unrealistic hope are offered as a means of beginning the conversation about this complex aspect of working with client hope.
    British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 05/2014; 42(3).
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    ABSTRACT: Other than through personal reflection and anecdotal evidence, I have had little opportunity to explore the influence of my visual impairment upon my therapeutic relationships. In order to address this, I conducted three research conversations with former clients (participants), each of whom had expressed an interest in participating in the research. Potential participants also had to meet the inclusion criteria for the research and provide informed consent prior to their participation. Research conversations were conducted between March and July 2009 and were analysed qualitatively, using a method informed by Moustakas's heuristic inquiry. Participants demonstrated idiosyncratic responses to my visual impairment; their perception of their responses to my visual impairment sometimes differed from mine. Feelings identified included uncertainty, disappointment and relief. My visual impairment appeared to influence the therapeutic relationship in a variety of ways, including resonance with the inner world significance of disability to the participant and interaction with my personal process. While not the therapeutic agent, my visual impairment had the potential to act as a catalyst in therapeutic change. The potential for me to either under-estimate or over-estimate the significance of my visual impairment highlights the need for continued self-awareness and the maintenance of an open and non-defensive attitude.
    British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 05/2014; 42(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of the present study was to compare the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioural (CBT) and psychodynamic (PDT) therapies in the treatment of anxiety among university students. To this aim, the Symptom Questionnaire (SQ) was completed by 30 students assigned to CBT and by 24 students assigned to PDT, both at the beginning and at the end of treatment. The main problem presented by all patients was anxiety. Except for one sub-scale, we observed significant differences in the scores of all sub-scales and scales of SQ, with lower scores at the end of the therapy, indicating lower distress, regardless of the type of treatment. The present findings suggest that both therapies are effective in the treatment of anxiety among university students.
    British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 05/2014; 42(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Structural explanations of career choice and development are well established. Socioeconomic inequality represents a powerful factor shaping career trajectories and economic outcomes achieved by individuals. However, a robust and growing body of evidence demonstrates a strong link between socioeconomic inequality and health outcomes. Work is a key factor explaining differences in income and lifestyle. It seems unavoidable that inequality in careers has profound consequences for health and well-being, but this relationship is largely ignored by career scholars. Some implications of health inequality for career guidance interventions are suggested.
    British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 05/2014; 42(3).