British Journal of Guidance and Counselling (BRIT J GUID COUNS )

Publisher: Careers Research and Advisory Centre (Cambridge, England), Taylor & Francis

Description

British Journal of Guidance & Counselling is the leading forum for debate between academics, trainers and practitioners in the field, publishing high-quality, international contributions in the following areas: the theory and practice of guidance and counselling the provision of guidance and counselling services training and professional issues Theoretical and empirical studies relating to the practice of guidance and counselling are reported, drawing on a variety of disciplines, encompassing both quantitative and qualitative methodologies, and ranging in scope from large-scale surveys to individual case-studies. The journal also explores the links between various areas of guidance and counselling and their relationship to such cognate fields as education, psychotherapy and social work. In addition to regular papers, the journal features special articles under the headings 'A Personal View', 'Interview', 'In Practice' and 'Debate', along with book reviews and frequent Symposia focusing on areas of particular interest. British Journal of Guidance & Counselling is published on behalf of the Careers Research and Advisory Centre.

Impact factor 0.75

  • 5-year impact
    0.75
  • Cited half-life
    7.50
  • Immediacy index
    0.18
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.23
  • Website
    British Journal of Guidance and Counselling website
  • Other titles
    British journal of guidance & counselling (Online), British journal of guidance and counselling, British journal of guidance and counseling
  • ISSN
    0306-9885
  • OCLC
    43770214
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • On author's personal website or departmental website immediately
    • On institutional repository or subject-based repository after either 12 months embargo for STM, Behavioural Science and Public Health Journals or 18 months embargo for SSH journals
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • The publisher will deposit in on behalf of authors to a designated institutional repository including PubMed Central, where a deposit agreement exists with the repository
    • STM: Science, Technology and Medicine
    • SSH: Social Science and Humanities
    • Publisher last contacted on 25/03/2014
    • 'Taylor & Francis (Psychology Press)' is an imprint of 'Taylor & Francis'
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article reports findings from a phenomenographic investigation into career practitioners' understanding of competency for social media in career services. Sixteen Danish and Finnish practitioners with experience using social media in career services were interviewed in focus groups. Competency for social media in career services was conceived as (i) an ability to use social media for delivering information, (ii) an ability to use social media for delivering career services, (iii) an ability to utilise social media for collaborative career exploration and (iv) an ability to utilise social media for co-careering. The findings can be used to develop pre-service and in-service training of career practitioners and support for the deepening of their competency, using the critical aspects that were identified.
    British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 01/2015; 43(1):43-56.
  • British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 11/2014; 42(2).
  • British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 11/2014; 42(2).
  • British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 11/2014; 42(2).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Careers advisers in the UK have experienced significant change and upheaval within their professional practice. This research explores the role of postgraduate-level professional development in contributing to professional identity. The research utilises a case study approach and adopts multiple tools to provide an in-depth examination of practitioners' perceptions of themselves as professionals within their lived world experience. It presents a group of practitioners struggling to define themselves as professionals due to changing occupational nomenclature resulting from shifting government policy. Postgraduate professional development generated a perceived enhancement in professional identity through exposure to theory, policy and opportunities for reflection, thus contributing to more confident and empowered practitioners. Engagement with study facilitated development of confident, empowered practitioners with a strengthened sense of professional self.
    British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 11/2014; 42(2).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study sought to explore the impact of ending therapy on counsellors working with children in schools. Five counsellors were interviewed and their responses were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Four master themes emerged, one of which, empathic identification, is the focus of this paper. The findings of this study suggest that the counsellor's experience of ending therapy can evoke long-term powerful emotions.
    British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 10/2014; 42(5).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This positional paper originates from our need as researcher/practitioners to establish a meaningful epistemological framework for research into bereaved people's journey through loss and grief over time. We describe how the field of grief research has a long and established biological basis, in keeping with a positivist epistemology. However, there has been a diminution of the influence of logical positivism in twenty-first-century counselling research. We argue that in grief counselling research, naturalistic observation of the grieving process within a logical positivist paradigm, remains a valid and valuable construct. We posit an observational protocol for the grief counselling process which minimises the intrusion of research method into the therapeutic process. We offer this as a means of conducting qualitative research within a bereavement counselling service. Further, we suggest that the development of an observational protocol for a client's grieving process has potential implications for developing good practice in grief work.
    British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 10/2014; 42(5).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study explores how adolescent clients construct the purpose and outcome of counselling. A narrative analysis was performed on interviews with 22 clients (aged 16–18) who had used a school-based counselling service. The aim was to identify the purpose and outcomes that participants attributed to their counselling experience. The analysis identified four narrative forms that young clients used to describe counselling. These included ‘transformative’, ‘supportive’, ‘pragmatic’ and ‘disappointed’ narratives. Each narrative form constructed a different purpose and outcome for counselling. Engaging with clients' narratives about the purpose and intended outcome of counselling may allow counsellors to better match their expectations and approach to fit with their young client or to work with them to co-construct more flexible narratives that support helpful outcomes.
    British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 10/2014; 42(5).
  • British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 10/2014; 42(5).
  • British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 10/2014; 42(5).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Moving to a new country is often seen as a disturbing event in sojourners' lives. Several models of adjustment postulate that the first phase of the sojourn is either categorised by euphoria or anxiety. Using a case study of three Indian Postgraduate students, this paper investigates whether the beginning phase of these sojourners was euphoric or anxious in nature. The findings revealed that they had varied experiences and even mixed experiences that were both pleasant and/or unpleasant which were in turn determined by their individual differences and personal experiences. Another salient finding of this study was that the psychological side of the sojourn starts much before the students have even first set foot in the UK. This could serve as a basis for further research and to conceptualise a model of cultural adjustment that takes into account the impact of the pre-arrival phase on the overall sojourn experience.
    British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 10/2014; 42(5).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The effect of psychological resilience as a buffer against anxiety was investigated in a sample of 39 boys with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder (ASD) via individual online questionnaire responses to standardised inventories for assessing anxiety and psychological resilience. Ability to handle problems, make good decisions, think before acting and help others were the most powerful buffers against Generalised Anxiety Disorder, while thinking before acting significantly buffered social phobia. Believing that they were able to handle problems was significantly associated with less emotional anxiety about school, work or social activities, being irritable, unable to relax and fatigue. As well as describing the pathways between the components of psychological resilience and anxiety, these findings also suggest several specific directions for training programmes aimed at equipping boys with an ASD with skills to cope more effectively with anxiety.
    British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 10/2014; 42(5).
  • British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 10/2014; 42(5).
  • British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 10/2014; 42(5).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study evaluates the impact of an intervention on business school graduates' employability comprising of a curriculum-based career management skills (CMS) module and an industrial placement year. The study uses data from the destinations of leavers of higher education survey to examine the employability of different groups within the cohort (no intervention, CMS module only and CMS module plus structured work experience). It finds that structured work experience has clear, positive effects on the ability of graduates to secure employment in ‘graduate level’ jobs within six months of graduation. Furthermore, participation in the CMS module also has a clear, positive effect upon the ability of participants to secure employment.
    British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 10/2014; 42(5).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The Butabika-East London Link collaborated with Ugandan mental health services to train mental health professionals (psychiatric clinical officers, ‘PCOs’, and clinical psychologists and psychiatrists, ‘Core Group’) in psychological therapies. The aims of this research were to investigate how professionals were applying and adapting psychological therapies to the Ugandan setting and to gain ideas to inform future training. Focus groups were used to explore the PCO's (N = 13) and Core Group's (N = 8) thoughts. Recordings were transcribed and thematically analysed. Themes identified were: issues affecting psychological therapy provision; cultural adaptations; voices of service users; and training. Different professional groups share similar concerns about implementing psychological therapies in a country where psychological services are just emerging. Future directions are suggested.
    British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 06/2014; 42(4).
  • British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 06/2014; 42(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Ghanaian migrants represent one of the largest Black African groups in the UK. While viewed positively in terms of economic and educational success, migration has impacts on emotional attachments. The aim of this study was therefore to explore narrative expressions of belonging and emotional connectedness for Ghanaian university students in the UK. Nine Ghanaian students took part in one of two focus group interviews. A narrative analysis revealed stories of separation, emotional belonging, meaningful connectedness and disconnections. Connections were made to the homeland through Ghanaian food, clothing, language, religion and communication with significant persons. Stories of disconnection were related to isolation and a sense of not belonging. Recommendations are made for therapist training, culturally sensitive university environments and further research.
    British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 06/2014; 42(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study aimed at investigating the intercorrelation among affective, cognitive and behavioural components on procrastination. A total of 402 undergraduate students (115 males, 286 females, 1 not indicated) participated in the study. Students completed the General Procrastination Scale, Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale, Frost Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale and Self-regulation Inventory. A constructed hypothesised model was tested by utilising path analysis. Overall, the analysis indicated that the model sufficiently explained the data. The findings showed the multicorrelation among the variables, ranging from 14 to 58. Squared multiple correlation coefficients (R 2) of procrastination revealed that endogenous and mediator variables explained 33% of the total variance in procrastination. The results demonstrated the importance of affect, cognition and behaviour on problematic delay referred to as procrastination.
    British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 05/2014; 42(3).