The Bone & Joint Journal (J BONE JOINT SURG BR)

Publisher: British Editorial Society of Bone and Joint Surgery, British Editorial Society of Bone and Joint Surgery

Journal description

The Bone & Joint Journal (BJJ) formerly known as The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (British Volume), is published by The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery, a registered charity (No. 209299). The Society was established with the object of: 'The advancement and improvement of education in orthopaedic surgery and allied branches of surgery and the diffusion of knowledge of new and improved methods of teaching and practising orthopaedic surgery in all its branches'. BJJ is the flagship publication under the Bone & Joint umbrella, a major provider of content and services for the orthopaedic community.

Current impact factor: 2.80

Impact Factor Rankings

2015 Impact Factor Available summer 2015
2013 / 2014 Impact Factor 2.801
2012 Impact Factor 2.689
2011 Impact Factor 2.832
2010 Impact Factor 2.351
2009 Impact Factor 2.655
2008 Impact Factor 2.196
2007 Impact Factor 1.868
2006 Impact Factor 1.79
2005 Impact Factor 1.565
2004 Impact Factor 1.33
2003 Impact Factor 1.503
2002 Impact Factor 1.457
2001 Impact Factor 1.467
2000 Impact Factor 1.612
1999 Impact Factor 1.551
1998 Impact Factor 1.501
1997 Impact Factor 1.543
1996 Impact Factor 1.518
1995 Impact Factor 1.16
1994 Impact Factor 1.264
1993 Impact Factor 1.18
1992 Impact Factor 0.986

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 3.35
Cited half-life 0.00
Immediacy index 0.30
Eigenfactor 0.01
Article influence 0.38
Website Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery, British Volume website
Other titles Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery - British Volume
ISSN 0301-620X
OCLC 1754474
Material type Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

British Editorial Society of Bone and Joint Surgery

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • On author's personal website or institutional repository
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • Must link to publisher version
    • NIH funded authors will have their article deposited in PubMed Central 12 months after publication
    • Publisher last contacted on 16/06/2014
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We define the long-term outcomes and rates of further operative intervention following displaced Bennett's fractures treated with Kirschner (K)-wire fixation. We prospectively identified patients who were treated for displaced Bennett's fractures over a 13 year period between 1996 and 2009. Electronic records for these patients were examined and patients were invited to complete a Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire in addition to a patient satisfaction questionnaire. We identified 143 patients with displaced Bennett's fractures treated with K-wire fixation and followed them up at a mean of 13 years. The mean patient age at the time of injury was 33.2 years. At the time of follow up, 11 patients had died and 1 had developed dementia and was unable to respond. 9 patients had no contact details. This left 122 patients available for recruitment. Of these, 60 did not respond leaving a study group of 62 patients. Patients reported excellent functional outcomes and high levels of satisfaction at follow up. Mean satisfaction was 89% and the mean DASH score was 3.2. The infection rate was 3%. None of the 122 patients had undergone salvage procedures and none of the responders had changed occupation or sporting activities. Long-term patient reported outcomes following displaced Bennett's are excellent. Fusion surgery or trapeziectomy was not undertaken for any patient in this series nor did this injury result in sporting or occupational changes. The rate of infection is low and similar to the literature for other surgical procedures with percutaneous K-wires.
    The Bone & Joint Journal 05/2015; 97-B((SUPP 5)):5.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Knee arthrodesis is a potential salvage procedure for limb preservation after failure of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) due to infection. In this study, we evaluated the outcome of single-stage knee arthrodesis using an intramedullary cemented coupled nail without bone-on-bone fusion after failed and infected TKA with extensor mechanism deficiency. Between 2002 and 2012, 27 patients (ten female, 17 male; mean age 68.8 years; 52 to 87) were treated with septic single-stage exchange. Mean follow-up duration was 67.1months (24 to 143, n = 27) (minimum follow-up 24 months) and for patients with a minimum follow-up of five years 104.9 (65 to 143,; n = 13). A subjective patient evaluation (Short Form (SF)-36) was obtained, in addition to the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). The mean VAS score was 1.44 (SD 1.48). At final follow-up, four patients had recurrent infections after arthrodesis (14.8%). Of these, three patients were treated with a one-stage arthrodesis nail exchange; one of the three patients had an aseptic loosening with a third single-stage exchange, and one patient underwent knee amputation for uncontrolled sepsis at 108 months. All patients, including the amputee, indicated that they would choose arthrodesis again. Data indicate that a single-stage knee arthrodesis offers an acceptable salvage procedure after failed and infected TKA
    The Bone & Joint Journal 05/2015; 97-B(5):649-653.
  • The Bone & Joint Journal 04/2015; 97-B:520-526.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study demonstrates a significant correlation between the American Knee Society (AKS) Clinical Rating System and the Oxford Knee Score (OKS) and provides a validated prediction tool to estimate score conversion. A total of 1022 patients were prospectively clinically assessed five years after TKR and completed AKS assessments and an OKS questionnaire. Multivariate regression analysis demonstrated significant correlations between OKS and the AKS knee and function scores but a stronger correlation (r = 0.68, p < 0.001) when using the sum of the AKS knee and function scores. Addition of body mass index and age (other statistically significant predictors of OKS) to the algorithm did not significantly increase the predictive value. The simple regression model was used to predict the OKS in a group of 236 patients who were clinically assessed nine to ten years after TKR using the AKS system. The predicted OKS was compared with actual OKS in the second group. Intra-class correlation demonstrated excellent reliability (r = 0.81, 95% confidence intervals 0.75 to 0.85) for the combined knee and function score when used to predict OKS. Our findings will facilitate comparison of outcome data from studies and registries using either the OKS or the AKS scores and may also be of value for those undertaking meta-analyses and systematic reviews.
    The Bone & Joint Journal 04/2015; 2015(97-B):503-509. DOI:10.1302/0301-620X.97B4.34867
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a rare proliferative process of the synovium which most commonly affects the knee and occurs in either a localised (LPVNS) or a diffuse form (DPVNS). The effect of different methods of surgical synovectomy and adjuvant radiotherapy on the rate of recurrence is unclear. We conducted a systematic review and identified 35 observational studies in English which reported the use of surgical synovectomy to treat PVNS of the knee. A meta-analysis included 630 patients, 137 (21.8%) of whom had a recurrence after synovectomy. For patients with DPVNS, low-quality evidence found that the rate of recurrence was reduced by both open synovectomy (odds ration (OR) = 0.47; 95% CI 0.25 to 0.90; p = 0.024) and combined open and arthroscopic synovectomy (OR = 0.19, 95% CI = 0.06 to 0.58; p = 0.003) compared with arthroscopic surgery. Very low-quality evidence found that the rate of recurrence of DPVNS was reduced by peri-operative radiotherapy (OR = 0.31, 95% CI 0.14 to 0.70; p = 0.01). Very low-quality evidence suggested that the rate of recurrence of LPVNS was not related to the surgical approach. This meta-analysis suggests that open synovectomy or synovectomy combined with peri-operative radiotherapy for DPVNS is associated with a reduced rate of recurrence. Large long-term prospective multicentre observational studies, with a focus on both rate of recurrence and function, are required to confirm these findings. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2015;97-B:550-7. ©2015 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.
    The Bone & Joint Journal 04/2015; 97-B(4):550-7. DOI:10.1302/0301-620X.97B4.34907
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study demonstrates a significant correlation between the American Knee Society (AKS) Clinical Rating System and the Oxford Knee Score (OKS) and provides a validated prediction tool to estimate score conversion. A total of 1022 patients were prospectively clinically assessed five years after TKR and completed AKS assessments and an OKS questionnaire. Multivariate regression analysis demonstrated significant correlations between OKS and the AKS knee and function scores but a stronger correlation (r = 0.68, p < 0.001) when using the sum of the AKS knee and function scores. Addition of body mass index and age (other statistically significant predictors of OKS) to the algorithm did not significantly increase the predictive value. The simple regression model was used to predict the OKS in a group of 236 patients who were clinically assessed nine to ten years after TKR using the AKS system. The predicted OKS was compared with actual OKS in the second group. Intra-class correlation demonstrated excellent reliability (r = 0.81, 95% confidence intervals 0.75 to 0.85) for the combined knee and function score when used to predict OKS. Our findings will facilitate comparison of outcome data from studies and registries using either the OKS or the AKS scores and may also be of value for those undertaking meta-analyses and systematic reviews. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2015;97-B:503-9.
    The Bone & Joint Journal 04/2015; 97-B(4):503-9.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Hypovitaminosis D has been identified as a common risk factor for fragility fractures and poor fracture healing. Epidemiological data on vitamin D deficiency have been gathered in various populations, but the association between vertebral fragility fractures and hypovitaminosis D, especially in males, remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OH D) in patients presenting with vertebral fragility fractures and to determine whether patients with a vertebral fracture were at greater risk of hypovitaminosis D than a control population. Furthermore, we studied the seasonal variations in the serum vitamin D levels of tested patients in order to clarify the relationship between other known risk factors for osteoporosis and vitamin D levels. We measured the serum 25-OH D levels of 246 patients admitted with vertebral fractures (105 men, 141 female, mean age 69 years, sd 8.5), and in 392 orthopaedic patients with back pain and no fractures (219 men, 173 female, mean age 63 years, sd 11) to evaluate the prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency. Statistical analysis found a significant difference in vitamin D levels between patients with vertebral fragility fracture and the control group (p = 0.036). In addition, there was a significant main effect of the tested variables: obesity (p < 0.001), nicotine abuse (p = 0.002) and diabetes mellitus (p < 0.001). No statistical difference was found between vitamin D levels and gender (p = 0.34). Vitamin D insufficiency was shown to be a risk factor for vertebral fragility fractures in both men and women. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2015;97-B:89-93. ©2015 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.
    The Bone & Joint Journal 01/2015; 97-B(1):89-93. DOI:10.1302/0301-620X.97B1.34558
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is an established and successful procedure. However, the design of prostheses continues to be modified in an attempt to optimise the functional outcome of the patient. The aim of this study was to determine if patient outcome after TKA was influenced by the design of the prosthesis used. A total of 212 patients (mean age 69; 43 to 92; 131 female (62%), 81 male (32%)) were enrolled in a single centre double-blind trial and randomised to receive either a Kinemax (group 1) or a Triathlon (group 2) TKA. Patients were assessed pre-operatively, at six weeks, six months, one year and three years after surgery. The outcome assessments used were the Oxford Knee Score; range of movement; pain numerical rating scales; lower limb power output; timed functional assessment battery and a satisfaction survey. Data were assessed incorporating change over all assessment time points, using repeated measures analysis of variance longitudinal mixed models. Implant group 2 showed a significantly greater range of movement (p = 0.009), greater lower limb power output (p = 0.026) and reduced report of 'worst daily pain' (p = 0.003) over the three years of follow-up. Differences in Oxford Knee Score (p = 0.09), report of 'average daily pain' (p = 0.57) and timed functional performance tasks (p = 0.23) did not reach statistical significance. Satisfaction with outcome was significantly better in group 2 (p = 0.001). These results suggest that patient outcome after TKA can be influenced by the prosthesis used. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2015;97-B:64-70. ©2015 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.
    The Bone & Joint Journal 01/2015; 97-B(1):64-70. DOI:10.1302/0301-620X.97B1.34254
  • The Bone & Joint Journal 01/2015; 97 B.
  • The Bone & Joint Journal 01/2015;
  • The Bone & Joint Journal 12/2014; 96 B:19.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We conducted a retrospective study to assess the prevalence of adverse reactions to metal debris (ARMD) in patients operated on at our institution with metal-on-metal (MoM) total hip replacements with 36 mm heads using a Pinnacle acetabular shell. A total of 326 patients (150 males, 175 hips; 176 females, 203 hips) with a mean age of 62.7 years (28 to 85) and mean follow-up of 7.5 years (0.1 to 10.8) participating in our in-depth modern MoM follow-up programme were included in the study, which involved recording whole blood cobalt and chromium ion measurements, Oxford hip scores (OHS) and plain radiographs of the hip and targeted cross-sectional imaging. Elevated blood metal ion levels (> 5 parts per billion) were seen in 32 (16.1%) of the 199 patients who underwent unilateral replacement. At 23 months after the start of our modern MoM follow-up programme, 29 new cases of ARMD had been revealed. Hence, the nine-year survival of this cohort declined from 96% (95% CI 95 to 98) with the old surveillance routine to 86% (95% CI 82 to 90) following the new protocol. Although ARMD may not be as common in 36 mm MoM THRs as in those with larger heads, these results support the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency guidelines on regular reviews and further investigations, and emphasise the need for specific a follow-up programme for patients with MoM THRs. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2014; 96-B:1610-17. ©2014 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.
    The Bone & Joint Journal 12/2014; 96-B(12):1610-7. DOI:10.1302/0301-620X.96B12.33742
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The optimal timing of total knee replacement (TKR) in patients with osteoarthritis, in relation to the severity of disease, remains controversial. This prospective study was performed to investigate the effect of the severity of osteoarthritis and other commonly available pre- and post-operative clinical parameters on the clinical outcome in a consecutive series of cemented TKRs. A total of 176 patients who underwent unilateral TKR were included in the study. Their mean age was 68 years (39 to 91), 63 (36%) were male and 131 knees (74%) were classified as grade 4 on the Kellgren–Lawrence osteoarthritis scale. A total of 154 patients (87.5%) returned for clinical review 12 months post-operatively, at which time the outcome was assessed using the Knee Society score. A low radiological severity of osteoarthritis was not associated with pain 12 months post-operatively. However, it was significantly associated with an inferior level of function (p = 0.007), implying the need for increased focus on all possible reasons for pain in the knee and the forms of conservative treatment which are available for patients with lower radiological severity of osteoarthritis.
    The Bone & Joint Journal 11/2014; 96-B(11):1498. DOI:10.1302/0301-620X.96B11.33726