Early Child Development and Care (Early Child Dev Care )

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Description

Early Child Development and Care is a multidisciplinary publication that serves psychologists, educators, psychiatrists, pediatricians, social workers and other professionals who deal with research, planning, education and care of infants and young children. The periodical provides English translations of work in this field that has been published in other languages, and original English papers on all aspects of early child development and care: descriptive and evaluative articles on social, educational and preventive medical programs for young children, experimental and observational studies, critical reviews and summary articles. In addition, to scientific papers, the periodical will contain book reviews, reports on conferences and other items of interest.

  • Impact factor
    0.00
  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
    0.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.00
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
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  • Website
    Early Child Development and Care website
  • Other titles
    Early child development and care, ECDC, E.C.D.C., International monograph series on early child care
  • ISSN
    0300-4430
  • OCLC
    1772625
  • Material type
    Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • On author's personal website or departmental website immediately
    • On institutional repository or subject-based repository after either 12 months embargo for STM, Behavioural Science and Public Health Journals or 18 months embargo for SSH journals
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • The publisher will deposit in on behalf of authors to a designated institutional repository including PubMed Central, where a deposit agreement exists with the repository
    • STM: Science, Technology and Medicine
    • SSH: Social Science and Humanities
    • Publisher last contacted on 25/03/2014
    • 'Taylor & Francis (Psychology Press)' is an imprint of 'Taylor & Francis'
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper aims at exploring the roles preschool teachers give technologies in mathematics education and the ways they structure their mathematics learning activities using interactive whiteboard (IWB) as a technological artefact. Data collected from observations of three preschool teachers embedding IWB in a preschool practice in Sweden provided the primary data sources. The findings suggest that the use of IWB in preschool can be viewed as ‘Multisensory resources to engage young children's reasoning’, ‘Challenging young children to engage in problem-solving activities’ and ‘Taking the child's interest as a point of departure’. This study also highlights the importance of preschool teachers' pedagogical and technological knowledge that shape and mediate the ways they embed IWB in preschool pedagogical practices.
    Early Child Development and Care 01/2015; 185(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Efficient early intervention (EI) services are required to serve the needs of young children with disabilities and the needs of their families. Effective EI includes family-centred practices, evidence-based interventions, parent involvement/training, and delivery in children's natural environments. Due to the challenges of providing home-based EI for children with disabilities, there is a need to identify alternative service models. One possible alternative service-delivery model is training and coaching parents from a distance, via Internet technologies. The purposes of this paper are to (a) describe the challenges related to home-based EI services, (b) discuss the potential advantages of using Internet-based interventions as a supplemental service model, and (c) describe current Internet-based interventions by reviewing the literature related to training parents of young children with autism, from a distance via the Internet.
    Early Child Development and Care 01/2015; 185(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Developing leadership among early childhood professionals has become increasingly important as investing in children's early years has been championed as a public and private national and international priority. Two case studies present how oral inquiry and specifically, the Prospect Center's Descriptive Review of a Professional Dilemma of Practice, was used to support early childhood professionals to develop their leadership by strengthening the skills and dispositions they need to critically reflect upon, explore and negotiate the complex dilemmas they face in the context of their daily practice. Research on the use of inquiry to address uncertainty, the development of reflective practices, relational logics of effectiveness and social justice leadership inform discussion of the findings. Implications suggest the promise of using oral inquiry to support leadership development for early childhood professionals.
    Early Child Development and Care 01/2015; 185(1).
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between externalising behaviours and emotional skills of 60–72-month-old children and to determine the differentiation in externalising behaviours and emotional skills according to the variable gender. The sample consists of 209 children who are 60–72 months old. Ninety-six of the children are female and 113 are male. As data collection tools, Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory and Assessment of Children's Emotion Skills are used. The study reveals that there is a significant relationship between the total emotional skill scores, subdimensions of understanding and expressing emotions, and the externalising behaviours, whereas there is no significant relationship between recognising emotions and externalising behaviours. Regarding the variable gender, a significant difference in the total emotional skills and the subdimension of emotional skill recognition is seen in favour of the female children.
    Early Child Development and Care 01/2015; 185(1).
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    ABSTRACT: Children's early relationships with their caregivers are important for later developmental outcomes, both proximally and distally, and enhanced caregiver–child relationships may promote positive outcomes at both the individual and family levels. In this article, we review six evidence-based caregiver–child interaction interventions that can be translated for use by staff in community-based early childhood programmes serving children between the ages of birth and five years. Early childhood programmes selecting a parenting intervention have opportunities to set priorities across a number of relevant criteria, ranging from the theoretical basis of the intervention to more practical issues such as the time commitment for families and staff requirements. To provide a starting point for such considerations, we compare the interventions' approaches and associated training requirements, summarise the evidence base for each intervention, and identify areas of divergence and common themes across the six selected interventions.
    Early Child Development and Care 01/2015; 185(1).
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    ABSTRACT: We designed a working memory (WM) training programme in game framework for mild intellectually disabled students. Twenty-four students participated as test and control groups. The auditory and visual–spatial WM were assessed by primary test, which included computerised Wechsler numerical forward and backward sub-tests and secondary tests, which contained three parts: dual visual–spatial test, auditory test and a one-syllable word recalling test. The results showed significant difference between WM capacity in the intellectually disabled children and normal ones (p-value We found that school is the best place for training. More comprehensive human–computer interfaces could be suitable for intellectually disabled students with visual and auditory impairments and problems in motor skills.
    Early Child Development and Care 01/2015; 185(1).
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    ABSTRACT: Mothers experiencing psychological distress in the postpartum period may have difficulties parenting their children. Inconsistent and unresponsive parenting may increase the risk of later emotional and behavioural problems in children. The purpose of this study was to identify how maternal psychological characteristics cluster at eight weeks postpartum, and whether these clusters were associated with maternal-reported child emotional and behavioural problems at the age of three years, as measured by the Parents' Evaluation of Developmental Status (PEDS) questionnaire. In a longitudinal pregnancy cohort (N = 647), three clusters of postpartum psychological characteristics were identified. Contrary to expectations, mothers with the greatest psychological distress did not report concerns about their child's emotional and behavioural problems; rather, they reported concerns about global developmental delay. These findings suggest that infants of mothers experiencing postpartum psychological distress should receive additional follow-up to reduce the risk for global developmental delay.
    Early Child Development and Care 01/2015; 185(1).
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    ABSTRACT: Relationships between exposure to preschool education and children's academic and social outcomes have been documented in Western countries. There is a lack of comparable research in China, where preschool education is relatively formal, but rather flexible in arrangement. We conducted research at six public kindergartens in a large Chinese city (Beijing), involving 342 Chinese preschoolers (188 boys, 154 girls, M age = 60.45 months) and their middle-class parents and teachers. We examined the influence of preschool education exposure (assessed by age of entry and hours of attendance per week) on children's literacy, numeracy, and classroom behaviour problems. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses found that entering preschools at a younger age and staying there for a longer time benefited children's academic development, but longer attendance was also linked to slightly more behaviour problems. Specifically, beginning a full-day preschool education (i.e. eight to nine hours) for five days at ages two to three would likely enhance the overall development of all children. Earlier entry age and higher intensity of attendance in preschools specifically benefitted the numeracy skills of children from families with lower middle income or somewhat lower education levels in Beijing.
    Early Child Development and Care 01/2015; 185(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Kindergarten has become increasingly academic in nature. One of the primary dilemmas arising from this shift is the tension between the use of developmentally appropriate practices and the obligation to teach academic standards. To gain a deeper understanding of how kindergarten is enacted in the evolving curricular landscape, we look beyond these competing perspectives to develop a theoretical framework informed by Schwab's conception of the eclectic and the four commonplaces. We re-envision the four commonplaces – subject matter, teacher, milieu, and learner – to align them with contemporary conceptions of educational purposes, practical theory, classroom climate, and childhood. Acknowledging that kindergarten is an eclectic space, we create a robust theoretical framework for researchers interested in classroom research. The application of this framework is explored using an ethnographic methodology that integrates data from classroom observations, teacher interviews, and photo elicitation interviews with the students in one kindergarten classroom.
    Early Child Development and Care 12/2014; 184(12).
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    ABSTRACT: Play has long been recognised as a vehicle by which significant developmental advances occur during early childhood. Children use play to explore their relationships, their psychosocial skills, and their environment, and through their experiences, they begin to adopt specific capacities and values that have an impact on future socio-emotional and academic outcomes. To understand more fully the factors that contribute to well-being in early childhood, we explored footage of a full ‘day in the life’ of a 5-year-old boy in transition to kindergarten, and we conducted interviews with him, his parents, and teacher. We identified agentive and communitarian strivings to be significant sources of his thriving and primary elements of many episodes of play during his filmed day. Previous research indicates that the development of strong agentive and communitarian skills and values is related to positive psychosocial outcomes. The current case study explores our participant's agentive and communitarian behaviours as exemplified through episodes of play, and the ways in which these skills and values are encouraged and supported by his caregivers. Implications regarding the role of parents and educators in the facilitation of agentive and communitarian skills are discussed.
    Early Child Development and Care 12/2014; 184(12).
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    ABSTRACT: This paper provides a brief description of the Greek–Cypriot early childhood education system and focuses on the current education reform. We focus on one of the main changes of the reform, a new status for play within the daily educational programme. The goal of this paper is two-fold; first to portray play in the former and current proposed curricula though document analysis and second to provide examples of the current practices through non-participant observations and interviews with children, teachers and principals, concerning the role of play and describe how these have been traditionalised. Findings show the different perspectives on play and support the need for the reconceptualisation of play, since free activities are basically organised around structured and teacher-directed activities. The paper provides a stance on play which allows children to be social agents, supports socio-cultural processes of learning and encourages participation in meaningful play activities.
    Early Child Development and Care 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: This study investigates through observations and interviews what importance further education has for preschool teachers’ practice in two music-profiled preschool and their way of conceptualising it. A distinction between music as a method for teaching, on the one hand, and as a content of knowledge, on the other, is used in the analysis. The result shows that the teachers act confidently in dealing with music; both in spontaneous and planned activities, and that they show competence in teaching music to the children. In contradiction, when the teachers are interviewed about their work, they say that they have never been able to sing or play. They talk about music as a method for learning language, but they realise it in practice as the content of learning. This contradiction and its implications are discussed and it is argued that further education needs to take care of the fact that teachers need to develop a professional language.
    Early Child Development and Care 12/2014; 184(12).
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    ABSTRACT: The physical environment of the preschool programmes has been proven to affect both children's overall development and the quality of the programme. However, both nationally and internationally the contribution of the physical environment in the effectiveness of a programme and in the achievement of educational goals is often overlooked. The aim of the present study was to assess the quality of the indoor physical environment of infant/toddler and preschool classrooms and to examine differences between private and public classrooms. Research results indicate that the quality of the physical environment in both infant/toddler and preschool classrooms was of minimum quality. Moreover, limited differences have been revealed controlling for inspection body. The findings are discussed and the need to bring the scientific field of the physical environment to the forefront is highlighted.
    Early Child Development and Care 12/2014; 184(12).
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    ABSTRACT: This study examined fathers' perceptions regarding their home-based activities (HBA) and the influence of fathers' demographic characteristics on their perceptions and practices at home. A total of 396 fathers completed a survey questionnaire describing their demographic information, perceptions and their practices regarding their involvement in HBA. Results indicated that fathers have moderate level of practice concerning their HBA, yet they have low perception of their actual practice at HBA. In addition, there was a statistical significance in HBA due to fathers' age, educational level and specialisation which had an influence on their perceptions as well. Recommendations and implications of future research were discussed.
    Early Child Development and Care 12/2014; 184(12).
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    ABSTRACT: Building on Vinden's pioneering research [(2001). Parenting attitudes and children's understanding of mind: A comparison of Korean American and Anglo-American families. Cognitive Development, 16, 793–809], we examined how parents’ use of authoritative versus authoritarian styles of discipline related to their children's development of theory of mind (ToM). ToM was assessed using standard false belief tests and a developmental ToM Scale [Wellman, H. M., & Liu, D. (2004). Scaling of theory-of-mind tasks. Child Development, 75(2), 523–541] comprising five reliably sequential steps of ToM understanding from awareness of others’ desires through false belief to the recognition of hidden emotion that even 8-year-olds often have difficulty with. In contrast to previous largely null results, our results from a sample of 30 Anglo-Australian children aged 5–12 years and their 30 parents showed, for the first time, that there are significant negative links of child ToM with parental authoritarianism and significant positive links, independent of child age and language skill, between ToM understanding and authoritative parenting. These results contribute to a growing body of research on how family processes interconnect with children's social understanding and social adjustment.
    Early Child Development and Care 12/2014; 184(12).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The Swedish preschool curriculum emphasises preschool teachers' task to stimulate children's interest in science and technology. Technology education, however, has not always had a given place in Swedish early childhood education, and this has been associated with female preschool teachers' fear of technology. This qualitative study explores how students training to be teachers in Swedish preschool view both the technology education they themselves received during their school days and their future task of teaching technology in preschool. The study's empirical material is an assignment that the students did within their Preschool Teacher Programme. Seventy-nine students, including 77 women and 2 men, described their experiences in writing. Many students describe a boring technology education which made them, as girls, feel marginalised. However, there were also those who felt quite at ease with their technology classes. Nevertheless, the students, regardless of their former experiences, have a positive attitude towards the task of teaching technology. Technology education in preschool is viewed as something quite different from the technology education they themselves had in school. The students stress that technology in early childhood education should be something that children and preschool teachers explore together.
    Early Child Development and Care 12/2014; 184(12).
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    ABSTRACT: This research investigated the views of pre-service and in-service preschool teachers concerning the developing of children's creativity in early childhood education by determining the similarities and/or differences among their views. The data were gathered from 10 pre-service and 11 in-service teachers through focus group meetings, and then from the participants' views four basic themes were constituted consisting of their opinions on ‘creativity’, ‘creative people’, ‘importance of creativity in early childhood education’, and ‘obstacles to creativity in early childhood education’. The findings indicated that although the subjects had their own creativity definitions, they also had some common ideas. The subjects also shared their ideas about some of the essential characteristics of creative individuals. Furthermore, although the participants were aware of the value of creativity for young children's development and the need to implement activities that would nurture children's creativity, they still face many obstacles preventing them from achieving this crucial goal.
    Early Child Development and Care 12/2014; 184(12).
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    ABSTRACT: Primary objective: Research has provided evidence of the intersubjective function of imitation in grandparent–infant interaction based on the basic aspects of imitation. This lacks the systematic investigation of behaviour dynamics framing spontaneous imitation. The aim of this study was to compare the dyadic expressive behaviours (vocal, kinetic and vocal–kinetic combinations) preceding and following spontaneous imitative exchanges in grandmother–infant (GM–I) and grandfather–infant (GF–I) interactions. Method: Sixteen infants were video-recorded during spontaneous dyadic interactions with maternal grandmothers and grandfathers at home from the second to the tenth month of life. Results: Before and after imitation, there was a similarity between the GM–I and GF–I interactions, in that: (a) the communicative expressive behaviours predominated over non-communicative behaviours, (b) grandparent vocal/kinetic behaviours predominated over vocal and kinetic behaviours and (c) infant kinetic behaviours predominated over vocal and vocal/kinetic behaviours. Conclusion: It is assumed that imitation serves an intersubjective and transitional function in early grandparent–infant interaction.
    Early Child Development and Care 12/2014; 184(12).
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    ABSTRACT: In this qualitative study, interviews about children's secret hiding places were conducted with 3–5-year-olds (n = 17) in a university sponsored preschool programme using art narratives. Since prior studies indicate that children understand the concept of a secret as early as five and that they associate secrets with hiding places, the purpose of this study was to look specifically at preschool children's experiences within their secret spaces. Analyses using interpretive phenomenology indicated that preschool children view secret hiding places with a sense of complexity, and they reserve certain areas as off limits to everyone, even in terms of the knowledge that these places exist. Consistent with a sociocultural framework, hiding places appear to serve individual, relational, and collaborative purposes, and children show heightened agency when deciding the function of a particular place. Children also relate secrets with secret hiding places and describe both with excitement, imagination, and intimacy. Finally, children's conceptualisations of secret hiding places are discussed in relation to the sociocultural perspective and the implications for children's social and emotional development.
    Early Child Development and Care 12/2014; 184(12).
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    ABSTRACT: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/03004430.2014.901012#.UzxFZqiSwpE
    Early Child Development and Care 11/2014;