Early Child Development and Care (Early Child Dev Care )

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Description

Early Child Development and Care is a multidisciplinary publication that serves psychologists, educators, psychiatrists, pediatricians, social workers and other professionals who deal with research, planning, education and care of infants and young children. The periodical provides English translations of work in this field that has been published in other languages, and original English papers on all aspects of early child development and care: descriptive and evaluative articles on social, educational and preventive medical programs for young children, experimental and observational studies, critical reviews and summary articles. In addition, to scientific papers, the periodical will contain book reviews, reports on conferences and other items of interest.

  • Impact factor
    0.00
  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
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  • Immediacy index
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  • Eigenfactor
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  • Article influence
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  • Website
    Early Child Development and Care website
  • Other titles
    Early child development and care, ECDC, E.C.D.C., International monograph series on early child care
  • ISSN
    0300-4430
  • OCLC
    1772625
  • Material type
    Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis

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  • Post-print
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    • 18 month embargo for SSH journals
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    • Post-print on authors own website, Institutional or Subject Repository
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    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • Publisher will deposit to PMC on behalf of NIH authors.
    • STM: Science, Technology and Medicine
    • SSH: Social Science and Humanities
    • 'Taylor & Francis (Psychology Press)' is an imprint of 'Taylor & Francis'
  • Classification
    ​ yellow

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Abuse or neglect and disability often go hand in hand. Unfortunately, most professionals who work with maltreated young children are not aware of early childhood and disability-related resources and services available. In order to raise awareness across early childhood and child welfare systems, a five-week advanced training for volunteer child advocates, entitled Court-Appointed Special Advocate Strong Beginnings, was created. The pilot programme and formative evaluation are highlighted. Upon completion of the training, advocates reported being better prepared and more informed about both early childhood and child welfare systems. Future directions for raising awareness across the child welfare and early childhood special education communities are discussed.
    Early Child Development and Care 10/2014; 184.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The branding of children as ‘witches’, capable of harming others is a widespread practice in some countries in Africa and across the world. There is evidence of this within specific communities and faith groups; however, the extent to which this phenomenon occurs in England is unclear as is the response by childcare professionals, statutory agencies and Voluntary Organisations. Between 2000 and 2010, at least six children lost their lives in different parts of the UK following periods of abuse, neglect and trauma linked to what is now known as abuse arising from being labelled ‘witches’. Each of these children, died because their parent or carer believed that they were responsible for ill luck, ill fortune and/or ill health that had befallen them and/or members of their families.Drawing upon a children's rights framework, this paper aims to provide a critical examination of child abuse that is caused by a belief that children can and are ‘witches’ or possess some evil spirits, making them capable of causing harm and discord within a family. Existing literature will be interrogated to provide some background and a historical context to this alarming and abusive practice.
    Early Child Development and Care 10/2014; 184.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Behaviour problems in young children are fairly common. It has been suggested that approximately 5–14% of preschool children exhibit problem behaviour. There are many reasons for behaviour problems in preschool-aged period children. Researches reveal that link between victimisation and individual differences. However, but still, we do not know the prevalence of the possible precursors of peer victimisation among preschool children. The aim of this study was to investigate the predictive effects the level of behaviour problem variables have on peer victimisation of five to six-year-old children attending preschool education. The sample group of the research included 152 normally developed children selected by simple random sampling method among 5–6 years old children receiving preschool education in the city centre of the province of Çorum in Turkey. The relational survey method was used in this study. The Preschool Behaviour Questionnaire (PBQ) and the Peer Victimisation Scale were used in this study. The PBQ and the Peer Victimisation Scale were completed by the teachers. Results of this study concluded that there was a significant positive relationship between the level of child behaviour problems variables and peer victimisation. In addition, results show that behaviour problems of five to six-year-old preschool children have a significant predictive effect on their peer victimisation.
    Early Child Development and Care 10/2014; 184.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Prevention and intervention programmes for children at risk aim to improve child well-being and resilience. They do so using both direct and indirect strategies, intervening with children but also considering broader contextual factors (such as family dynamics). Children's subjective well-being comprises five main components (physical health, mental health, self-regulation, social competence, and cognitive competence) and is predicted by person, relationship, and contextual factors. Children's resilience, or ability to beat the odds under adverse conditions, is predicted by similar protective factors. Family well-being (FWB) is one of the strongest and most consistent predictors of child well-being and resilience. Aspects of FWB (including adult health and well-being, family self-sufficiency, and family resiliency) have been shown to impact child well-being through positive parent–child interactions. However, risk factors (including poverty and living in geographic locales with limited resources or high levels of neighbourhood violence) can threaten both family and child well-being. Strategies are offered for promoting FWB as a means of supporting resilience and well-being in children at risk for violence, abuse, or neglect.
    Early Child Development and Care 10/2014; 184.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Today, levels of mistreatment of children are internationally reported as having reached epidemic proportions. Throughout recorded history babies and young children have suffered acts of violence by parents, care providers and others. However, ‘some believe that, for the first time in history, we are beginning to face the true prevalence and significance of child abuse’ (Hopper, J. (2010). Child abuse. Statistics, research and resources. Retrieved December 10, 2011, from http://www.jimhopper.com). In this review of the literature, we will use ECVAN (early childhood violence, abuse and neglect) to refer to violence, abuse and neglect of children, birth to eight years, in harmony with the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (1989). The review has been undertaken using a comprehensive series of data bases across all major disciplines which have regard to the heath, well-being and development of young children from birth to 8 years – and beyond wherever appropriate. The paper is guided by a socio-ecological model of contexts, participants and interactional complexity. There is no simple explanation for the abuse of young children – sometimes systemic in particular cultures – as there is no simple mechanism for the early identification of possible abusers and hence preventative practice. A wide range of contemporary research literature has enabled us to draw out significant issues related to abuse and abuse prevention. Central to all this we suggest is community engagement with the issue of child health, the establishment or refinement of public health policies and practices which through routine surveillance, parent support, education and multisectoral actions bring best practice to the fore within and on behalf of families and communities.
    Early Child Development and Care 10/2014; 184.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Family interviews were conducted with 28 7–12-year-old children who had experienced various forms of bullying and relational aggression by their peers, as well as with their parent and with an older sibling. Interviews explored possible supportive strategies of older siblings, parents, and teachers. All bullied children reported negative feelings about their experiences. Boys reported more physical bullying than girls. Bullies of boys were significantly more likely to experience consequences as a result of their behaviours. About half of the parents said that they had contacted the school about the bullying. Specific suggestions are given for how schools together with parents can create a climate that decreases bullying in schools.
    Early Child Development and Care 10/2014; 184.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Parental abuse is supposedly objectionable because it is the instigation of the child's delinquency. This instigation is likely to stem from the impairment of parental control arising from parental abuse, with respect to social control theory. For the substantiation of this likelihood, the present study surveyed 229 users of youth social work services in Hong Kong, China. Results illuminate the mediating role of parental control for the instigation of delinquency and delinquent intention by parental abuse reported to happen at the age of 11 years. The results imply the importance of curbing parental abuse and enhancing or reviving parental control after parental abuse to prevent delinquent risks and expedite rehabilitation from the risks.
    Early Child Development and Care 10/2014; 184.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: International research indicates that children with disabilities are more exposed to negative parenting than their non-disabled peers. The mechanisms behind this increased risk are likely operating at the levels of the individual child, the family and the broader social context. The present study investigated harsh parenting practices using self-report data from Swedish parents of children with disabilities (30 mothers and 14 fathers) and control parents (145 mothers and 25 fathers). Sweden provides an interesting context for the current research since it has outlawed physical punishment of children, displays comparatively small gaps in socio-economic circumstances and has implemented an extensive welfare system addressing the needs of children with disabilities and their families. There was no difference in harsh parenting practices between parents of children with disabilities and control parents. However, more fathers of children with disabilities than control fathers admitted use of violence at least once. Within the group of parents of children with disabilities, child disruptive behaviour problems predicted harsh parenting practices. Socio-economic disadvantage did not predict harsh parenting practices and possible explanations for this absent finding are discussed. Clinical and policy implications are discussed.
    Early Child Development and Care 10/2014; 184.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: When the author was adviser to the Australian Minister for Education for writing the national Safe Schools Framework (2003), meetings were held with early-childhood care and education administrators from all state, Catholic and independent sectors. Their unexpected message was that educators were facing new problems, those of child sexual abuse in early-childhood settings including pupils forcing younger children to provide oral sex. In January 2013, the South Australian Minister for Education lost her position following well-publicised parental anger that the Education Department had concealed the sexual abuse of children in early-childhood centres and schools. Parental outrage led to a Royal Commission and ‘Report of Independent Education Inquiry’ (2013) conducted by former Justice Bruce Debelle QC. Public dissatisfaction with some aspects of the Commission led further to a Parliamentary Select Committee Inquiry (February 2014) ‘Matters Relating to the Independent Education Inquiry’1
    Early Child Development and Care 10/2014; 184.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The importance of safeguarding children from violence is internationally recognised. However, detecting, intervening and protecting children from abuse both within the family and in institutions is complex. This paper specifically focuses on safeguarding in England and how workforce reform in the early years offers the opportunity to forge new partnerships with families and professionals. These relationships have the potential to support more positive outcomes for babies, young children and families who are ‘in need’ or where the children are at risk of significant harm or abuse has occurred. The paper draws on the findings from research exploring the impact of workforce reform in the early years and how the changes impact upon the wider safeguarding agenda. It will argue that the introduction of an inter-disciplinary graduate professional in the early years has afforded an opportunity to forge new partnerships that have the potential to significantly impact on child maltreatment.
    Early Child Development and Care 10/2014; 184.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper describes a study performed to investigate the impact of the conflict in Syria on Syrian refugee children. The Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan was chosen for this task. Two control (comparison) groups of children were selected: one from the Jordanian Ramtha district, which is just across the border from Syria, and that indirectly feel the consequences of the Syrian conflict, and the other from Amman, the capital of Jordan, which is far away from the border. The study compared the Zaatari, Ramtha and Amman groups in terms of expressed anxiety and depression symptoms. They were also compared with respect to their gender and age. The Zaatari children were more distressed than the others, and the symptom ‘thoughts of ending your life’ was expressed only by this group. The Ramtha group also expressed some distress. The fact that this group indirectly experiences the consequences of violence emphasises the dire circumstances of children inside Syria who are trapped between fighting groups.
    Early Child Development and Care 10/2014; 184.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Early childhood teachers play major roles in defying child abuse and neglect and alleviating its detrimental effects on young children. Therefore, this study aimed at exploring how Jordanian pre-service early childhood teachers define and perceive violence against children and their role in child abuse detection and prevention. Furthermore, the study aimed at identifying pre-service early childhood perceived preparation needs in child abuse and neglect. To achieve the study purposes, an interpretive qualitative approach was utilised. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with 25 pre-service early childhood teachers who completed a compulsory course in child abuse at the time of the study. Thematic analysis was applied to data through which findings were confined to three themes corresponding to the research questions: violence and abuse defined; perceived preparation needs; and perceived roles in child protection. Several implications and recommendations for educators and teacher preparation programmes were offered and discussed based on the findings of this study.
    Early Child Development and Care 04/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Existing research underscores the significance of early childhood experiences in the childcare context for the development of socioemotional skills and competencies. However, the practices adopted within childcare for the enhancement of children's socioemotional development and the factors mediating these practices are less adequately researched. The present study contributes to this understanding, through studying the perceptions of 34 educators working in childcare centres in Greece with regard to children's socioemotional development and its promotion. Results showed that although they acknowledged the significance of social and emotional competencies for children's adjustment, learning and well-being, they did not report consistent use of practices having as a goal the promotion of such skills. Explanations involve on the one hand the lack of formal policy and the existence of structural barriers and on the other hand a perception that socioemotional development is mostly affected by factors beyond their influence. Results are discussed in relation to prior research and in terms of their implications for designing interventions, curricula and staff training.
    Early Child Development and Care 03/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: This article reports on the findings of a one-year qualitative study in which a nursery school used information and communication technology (ICT) and a digital media consultant as a catalyst for cultural change leading to teachers’ improved pedagogical framing and children's enhanced learning dispositions. The pedagogic framing included the children making mini-movies and avatars which were uploaded onto the nursery website. It is argued that such innovative and creative ICT pedagogy was strongly motivational and afforded opportunities for co-construction and sustained shared thinking (SST) as it engaged with children's and families’ digital cultural habitus. The research reports on field notes, interviews and observations (n = 15) of child peer interactions and teacher child interactions.
    Early Child Development and Care 01/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Over the recent years there has been a shift in the field of early childhood research to involving young children in the research process. A vast body of literature [Evans, P., & Fuller, M. (1996). Hello. Who am I speaking to? Communicating with pre-school children in educational research settings. Early Years, 17(1), 17–20; Clark, A. (2004). Listening as a way of life. London: National Children's Bureau; Clark, A., & Moss, P. (2001). Listening to young children: The mosaic approach. London: National Children's Bureau; Clark, A., & Moss, P. (2005). Spaces to play: More listening to young children using the Mosaic approach. London: National Children's Bureau; Thomson, P. (Ed.). (2008). Doing visual research with children and young people. Abingdon: Routledge; Farrell, A. (Ed.). (2005). Ethical research with children. Maidenhead: Open University Press] discusses methods to be used with young children in research by means of participatory methods and listening to children's voices. A number of researchers mentioned throughout the paper have offered creative and innovative research tools that enable young children to participate in research. While recognising the responsibility to keep the discourse around children's participation alive, there is a need to problematise it as well as the issue of participation of young children is a complex one which requires continuous critical refection. Thus the enquiry I conduct here employed grounded theory and aims to examine the paradigm of children's participation in research. It is suggested in this paper that although participation is a vitally important element in researching young children, the discourse of children's participation should be focused additionally on ethical praxis of the research which should revolve around six key layers: intersubjectivity, indivisibility, phronesis, parsimony, equilibrium and finally the power of relationships and interaction between children and adults. As a consequence of this enquiry I conclude that all methods become relevant to research with children when ethical praxis characterises the nature of the project.
    Early Child Development and Care 01/2014; 184(5).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study aimed to present part of a mathematics programme for preschool age, to examine its efficiency in improving children's mathematical abilities in the area of number, and to investigate its suitability for Saudi practice. Pre- and post-tests, using TEMA-2 for one experimental and two control groups were conducted and quantitatively analysed. Teachers' reflection on their practice was sought through reflection forms and every two weeks discussion, which were qualitatively analysed to spot any practical and cultural considerations. Findings revealed that children's number knowledge in the experimental group has significantly improved compared with those of control groups. Teachers' practices have developed through three phases, representing different levels of experience and confidence. The study emphasised the allowing of flexible practices according to learners' needs, and providing professional support with newly implemented mathematics programmes. Some modifications for culturally related tools such as stories and songs were required. However, further investigation is needed to study these cultural issues.
    Early Child Development and Care 01/2014; 184(1).

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