Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services (J PSYCHOSOC NURS MEN )

Description

The Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services is the only monthly peer-reviewed publication for mental health nurses in clinical, academic, and research positions in a variety of community and institutional settings. The Journal provides the most up-to-date, practical information available for today's psychosocial nurse. Original articles and regular features are presented in a full-color magazine format. In addition to full-length scholarly articles, the Journal publishes short articles about new clinical approaches; new ways to organize departments, develop programs, or motivate staff; first-person accounts; and opinion pieces.

  • Impact factor
    0.83
    Show impact factor history
     
    Impact factor
  • 5-year impact
    0.78
  • Cited half-life
    5.90
  • Immediacy index
    0.10
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.18
  • Website
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing & Mental Health Services website
  • Other titles
    Journal of psychosocial nursing and mental health services
  • ISSN
    0279-3695
  • OCLC
    7816794
  • Material type
    Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: As the population continues to age and new medical developments make surgery at advanced ages increasingly possible, it is important to consider how older adults tolerate surgery and anesthesia. Considerable evidence shows that older adults have a higher risk of developing postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD), which leads to transient and sometimes long-term cognitive changes that may affect quality of life. Because little is known about how to prevent or treat POCD, it is important that nurses identify ways in which they can intervene to help patients who experience this disorder. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 52 (11), 17-20.].
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 11/2014; 52(11):17-20.
  • Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 11/2014; 52(11):3-4.
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    ABSTRACT: To the extent that genetic factors are associated with the efficacy, tolerability, and safety of different drugs, pharmacogenetic tests may be used to personalize medication treatments for an individual. Pharmacogenetic tests, such as GeneSight Psychotropic and the Genecept Assay, are being marketed directly to patients and prescribers despite a relative lack of evidence to support their clinical validity or utility. Pharmacogenetic testing is potentially useful in certain clinical situations, but its usefulness will depend on the knowledge base of the prescriber to be able to interpret the findings for a particular patient. Proposed guidelines on laboratory developed tests will likely encourage, if not require, evidence for the clinical validity and utility of pharmacogenetic tests before they are approved for marketing. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 52(11), 13-16.].
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 11/2014; 52(11):13-16.
  • Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 11/2014; 52(11):5-6.
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    ABSTRACT: The Hendrich II Fall Risk Model(™) (Hendrich II) is used to determine patient fall risks. However, the WilsonSims Fall Risk Assessment Tool (WSFRAT) is more specific to psychiatric patients. The current study tested the Hendrich II and WSFRAT simultaneously to determine which tool was the most predictive for patient falls in a psychiatric population. Fall risk assessments using the Hendrich II and WSFRAT tools were completed through discharge. Fall risk assessment scores, medications, and falls data were documented. Fifty patients who met eligibility criteria generated 319 observations; of the 50 patients, two (4%) experienced falls. Sensitivity was 100% for the Hendrich II and WSFRAT, with all patients properly categorized as high risk for falling. Both assessments had similar specificity (Hendrich II = 67.8%; WSFRAT = 63.1%). Both tools have similar specificity; thus, additional research is warranted. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, xx(x), xx-xx.].
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Restraint and seclusion (R/S) have been used in many countries and across service sectors for centuries. With the recent and increasing recognition of the harm associated with these procedures, efforts have been made to reduce and prevent R/S. Following a scathing media exposé in 1998 and congressional scrutiny, the United States began a national effort to reduce and prevent R/S use. With federal impetus and funding, an evidence-based practice, the Six Core Strategies(©) to Prevent Conflict, Violence and the Use of Seclusion and Restraint, was developed. This model was widely and successfully implemented in a number of U.S. states and is being adopted by other countries, including Finland, Australia, and the United Kingdom. Recently, the first cluster randomized controlled study of the Six Core Strategies in Finland provided the first evidence-based data of the safety and effectiveness of a coercion prevention methodology. Preliminary findings of some of the international efforts are discussed in the current article. Reduction in R/S use and other positive outcomes are also reported. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, xx(x), xx-xx.].
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The current study explored and described the experiences of individuals who either directed or participated in successfully reducing the use of restraint and seclusion (R/S) in two inpatient public mental health hospitals. A phenomenological methodology was used to capture the lived experiences of 21 study participants, including senior leaders, middle managers, and direct care staff, who were interviewed as key informants. Thirty-two themes were extracted and subsequently synthesized into five "meaning themes." The five meaning themes yielded six significant findings: (a) critical roles of leadership and staff in successful R/S reduction projects; (b) ability of leaders and staff to change their beliefs and behaviors; (c) ability of leaders and staff to build a shared vision that was critical to the reduction of R/S use in inpatient settings; (d) identification and resolution of key challenges staff and leaders experienced in reduction efforts; (e) use of a solid performance improvement lens to direct changes in practices; and (f) important lessons learned. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, xx(x), xx-xx.].
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Sleep disturbance is a problem for many children; however, it remains an underevaluated factor when assessing behavior. The purpose of the current article is to explore sleep problems in children, as well as the effects that disrupted sleep patterns have on child behavior. The authors recommend strategies to guide the assessment of sleep and improve children's sleep quality. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 52 (10), 27-32.].
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 10/2014; 52(10):27-32.
  • Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 10/2014; 52(10):14-15.
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of the current qualitative study was to investigate the experience of baccalaureate nursing (BSN) students with the clinical simulation of hearing distressing voices and derive themes from the written reflective data of students' evaluative statements. A purposive convenience sample of BSN students (N = 74) was recruited from two nursing cohorts at a private, religiously affiliated university BSN program in the northeastern United States. Student reflections on three evaluation questions of the simulation experience were analyzed using constant comparison as per naturalistic inquiry methodology. Themes emerged from each of the three questions related to students' experiences of hearing the simulated voices. Findings support the value of this simulation as a means to promote both active and affective learning in BSN students as they enter psychiatric-mental health clinical rotations. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 52(10), 42-51.].
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 10/2014; 52(10):42-51.
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    ABSTRACT: Suvorexant is a pharmacologically novel dual antagonist of orexin receptors OX1R and OX2R, which has an effect that promotes sleep by reducing arousal and wakefulness. Its approval for the treatment of insomnia was based on three clinical trials that found it to be efficacious and relatively well tolerated. Somnolence, headache, and dry mouth are the most common side effects. Because suvorexant has unique effects on arousal systems and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, it is contraindicated in patients with narcolepsy, and its use should be avoided or closely monitored in patients at risk for REM sleep behavior disorder, depression, or delirium. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 52(10), 23-26.].
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 10/2014; 52(10):23-26.
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    ABSTRACT: The current article presents the experiences of three different child- and family-serving programs in the United States that have successfully implemented interventions to prevent the use of restraint and seclusion (R/S) in their respective facilities. The article also provides family and youth perspectives on the impact of and recommendations for preventing R/S. Over the past decade, a significant shift has occurred toward preventing the use of R/S within programs serving children and adolescents. National efforts have included the work of the Building Bridges Initiative, as well as growing interest and support for the implementation of trauma-informed environments of care. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, xx(x), xx-xx.].
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: In one segment of a multifactor study conducted in 2011 at five psychiatric sites in three counties of Long Island, New York, 110 nurses were interviewed about their experiences with physical assault by psychiatric patients. Marked differences were identified between the male and female nurse participants who were assaulted. Women expressed feelings of inadequacy and questioned their competence. They felt blamed by administration and sometimes even colleagues. In addition, many did not report the incident for fear of reprisal. Women believed that violence was to be expected, and they considered it part of the job. On the other hand, men did not question their competency. They blamed external factors, such as poor staffing or unsafe design of the unit, or they stated that the patient was inadequately medicated and impossible to control. The male nurses did not feel blamed for the incident. All but one male nurse formally reported the incidents. They believed that violence in psychiatry is to be expected but should not be considered part of the job. These findings may be explained by Weiner's Attribution Theory. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, xx(x), xx-xx.].
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Experiential teaching strategies have the potential to more effectively help students with critical thinking than traditional lecture formats. Gaming is an experiential teaching-learning strategy that reinforces teamwork, interaction, and enjoyment and introduces the element of play. Two Bachelor of Science in Nursing students and a clinical instructor created a Jeopardy(®)-style game to enhance understanding of psychopharmacology, foster student engagement in the learning process, and promote student enjoyment during clinical postconference. The current article evaluates the utility, relevance, and effectiveness of gaming using a Jeopardy-style format for the psychiatric clinical setting. Students identified the strengths of this learning activity as increased awareness of knowledge deficits, as well as the reinforcement of existing knowledge and the value of teamwork. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, xx(x), xx-xx.].
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The future of psychiatric-mental health nursing depends on the preparation of nurses who will meet the mental health care needs of society. The current article discusses the development of the "Mental Health Ward," a simulated mental health experience that was offered for the first time to undergraduate baccalaureate nursing students at a Midwestern university in the United States. The Mental Health Ward is an innovative simulated hospital environment that includes the use of standardized patients and role play scenarios, resulting in a full mission simulation whereby students learn various psychiatric diagnoses and practice various pertinent skills, including nursing assessments, admission and discharge processes, medication administration, and therapeutic communication. Lessons learned by faculty and students in formulating the Mental Health Ward are presented. [ Journal of Psychosocial and Mental Health Nursing, xx(x), xx-xx.].
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The literature on techniques for improving student competency in therapeutic communication and interpersonal skills is limited. A simulation approach to enhance the learning of communication skills was developed to address these issues. Second-semester and senior nursing students participated in videorecorded standardized patient simulations, with senior students portraying the patient. Following simulated interactions, senior students provided feedback to junior students on their use of communication skills and other therapeutic factors. To integrate the learning experience, junior students completed a written assignment, in which they identified effective and noneffective communication; personal strengths and weaknesses; and use of genuineness, empathy, and positive regard. A videorecording of each student interaction gave faculty the opportunity to provide formative feedback to students. Student evaluations have been positive. Themes identified in student evaluations include the impact of seeing oneself, significance of practicing, getting below the surface in communication, and moving from insight to goal setting. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, xx(x), xx-xx.].
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Atypical antipsychotic drugs are not all alike with respect to their pharmacologies, therapeutic uses, and side eff ects, although many clinicians lump them together and do not distinguish among them. Risk assessment for the potential use of a drug, such as aripiprazole (Abilify), should not focus on any particular adverse effect, but rather should consider risk assessment in a broader context. Specifically, what are the alternatives, and what are their inherent risk profiles? What is the risk of no treatment? Side eff ects commonly associated with a particular drug or class of drugs can also occur with other drugs. For any drug prescribed for any reason, prescribers should document discussion about common and potentially serious adverse effects, as well as document clinical monitoring. Alternative treatments and their inherent risks, along with the risks of not taking medication for a particular condition, should also be discussed with patients and documented.
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 09/2014; 52(9):13-5.
  • Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 09/2014; 52(9):5.
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    ABSTRACT: The legalization of marijuana is a controversial issue with implications for health care providers, policy makers, and society at large. The use of marijuana for medical reasons is accepted in many states. However, legal sale of the drug for non-medical use began for the first time on January 1, 2014, in Colorado, following a relaxation of marijuana restrictions that is unprecedented worldwide. News reports have indicated that sales of the drug have been brisk. Marijuana-infused food products have been unexpectedly popular, exceeding sales projections. Marijuana use is associated with numerous physical and mental disorders and could result in addiction. Evidence suggests its potency has increased since the 1980s. Colorado has established regulations regarding the sale of marijuana for non-medical use, but concerns still exist. The current article offers a discussion of the health, public policy, socioeconomic, and nursing implications of the legalization of marijuana for non-medical use. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, xx(x), xx-xx.].
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Liver toxicity is the leading reason for withdrawal of marketed drugs and is a common reason for terminating the development of new drugs. Anticonvulsant, antidepressant, and antipsychotic drugs can be associated with significant liver injury or liver failure, but this is relatively rare compared to other non-psychotropic drug classes. More commonly, mild asymptomatic elevations in liver function tests are seen and these are not predictive of progression to more severe liver injury. Laboratory monitoring of liver function before and during treatment is recommended with the use of valproic acid and carbamazepine, but not for other psychotropic drugs, although regular laboratory testing is not a reliable method for detecting or preventing severe liver injury. Clinical monitoring for signs and symptoms suggesting hepatotoxicity or hypersensitivity reactions that affect the liver is more important. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 52(8), 23-26.].
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 08/2014; 52(8):23-26.