Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services (J PSYCHOSOC NURS MEN)

Publisher: Slack

Journal description

The Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services is the only monthly peer-reviewed publication for mental health nurses in clinical, academic, and research positions in a variety of community and institutional settings. The Journal provides the most up-to-date, practical information available for today's psychosocial nurse. Original articles and regular features are presented in a full-color magazine format. In addition to full-length scholarly articles, the Journal publishes short articles about new clinical approaches; new ways to organize departments, develop programs, or motivate staff; first-person accounts; and opinion pieces.

Current impact factor: 0.72

Impact Factor Rankings

2015 Impact Factor Available summer 2015
2013 / 2014 Impact Factor 0.873
2012 Impact Factor 0.825
2011 Impact Factor 0.48
2010 Impact Factor 0.528
2009 Impact Factor 0.707

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 0.78
Cited half-life 5.90
Immediacy index 0.10
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.18
Website Journal of Psychosocial Nursing & Mental Health Services website
Other titles Journal of psychosocial nursing and mental health services
ISSN 0279-3695
OCLC 7816794
Material type Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

Slack

  • Pre-print
    • Author cannot archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 12 months embargo
  • Conditions
    • On Institutional Repositories
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • NIH authors may deposit in PubMed Central after 12 months
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Publisher last reviewed on 21/04/2015
  • Classification
    ​ white

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Providing psychiatric services in the primary care setting is challenging. The multidisciplinary, coordinated approach of collaborative care models (CCMs) addresses these challenges. The purpose of the current article is to discuss the implementation of a CCM at a free medical clinic (FMC) where volunteer staff provide the majority of services. Essential components of CCMs include (a) comprehensive screening and assessment, (b) shared development and communication of care plans among providers and the patient, and (c) care coordination and management. Challenges to implementing and sustaining a CCM at a FMC in Virginia attempting to meet the medical and psychiatric needs of the underserved are addressed. Although the CCM produced favorable outcomes, sustaining the model long-term presented many challenges. Strategies for addressing these challenges are discussed. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 53(8), 36-44.]. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 08/2015; Volume 53(Issue 8):36-44. DOI:10.3928/02793695-20150720-06
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    ABSTRACT: Alexithymia is characterized by impairment of an individual's ability to experience, identify, and express emotions, and is associated with impaired emotional intelligence and an externally oriented cognitive style. There has been increasing interest in the phenomenon, with numerous peer-reviewed articles published recently. Alexithymia may occur in patients with many psychiatric disorders, and more severe alexithymia is related to worse outcome. However, many clinicians remain unaware of the issue. The current article discusses alexithymia and its importance in the field of mental health. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 53(8), 25-29.]. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 08/2015; 53(8):25-9. DOI:10.3928/02793695-20150720-04
  • Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 08/2015; 53(8):3-4. DOI:10.3928/02793695-20150727-22
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    ABSTRACT: New admissions to psychiatric inpatient units can significantly impact the environment and level of safety. Maintaining safety is a core and critical responsibility of nursing, but nurses are often overlooked in the decision to admit a patient. Missed opportunities for dialogue between nurses and the admitting physician challenge nurses' ability to proactively manage the therapeutic environment. When nurses are limited in this ability, the outcome can be an unpredictable and unstable milieu. In a 25-bed acute psychiatric inpatient unit, a formalized communication system among the multidisciplinary admission team was developed. Data collected over 1 year demonstrated improved safety. Increasing the admitting provider's awareness of the current unit acuity and involving the nursing staff early in the admission process improved collaboration among care team members and reduced risks to maintaining milieu safety. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 53(8), 30-35.]. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 08/2015; 53(8):30-5. DOI:10.3928/02793695-20150720-05
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    ABSTRACT: Children and adolescents who eat unusually large amounts of food, feel guilty about it, and try to hide their overeating may be struggling with binge eating disorder (BED), a condition associated with suicidal ideation and other eating disorders. Although BED is new to the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, the syndrome is becoming increasingly recognized. The study of BED in children and adolescents is in its natal phase, but the importance of recognition and possible treatment strategies are discussed in the current article along with psychiatric nursing implications. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 53(8), 18-22.]. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 08/2015; 53(8):18-22. DOI:10.3928/02793695-20150720-03
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    ABSTRACT: Skeletal muscle can be considered a secretory organ that produces myokines and other humoral factors having autocrine-, paracrine-, and endocrine-like signaling effects throughout the body. Exercise has such profound pharmacological and physiological effects that it should be considered a drug therapy. Exercise has documented benefits for preventing or treating many physical and mental disorders or their sequelae, and it has a potential role in managing adverse effects associated with drug therapies. If exercise were a drug evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration, it might be approved for a large number of therapeutic indications. Exercise can be appropriately prescribed for virtually anyone for primary, secondary, or tertiary prevention of many mental and physical disorders. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 53(8), 13-16.]. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 08/2015; 53(8):13-6. DOI:10.3928/02793695-20150727-03
  • Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 07/2015; 53(7):3-5. DOI:10.3928/02793695-20150618-55
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    ABSTRACT: Pictures can aid in understanding individual perspectives of an experience. Photovoice, a visual elicitation research approach, was used to engage nine participants with Parkinson's disease in taking photographs that, for them, represented important aspects of living with the disease. Participants' descriptions of their photographs revealed perspectives that can be theoretically linked to two psychosocial stages of development: (a) generativity versus stagnation and (b) integrity versus despair. Clear examples of generativity and integrity were present in participants' responses, reflecting determination and optimism in living with the disease. Findings highlight the need to seek understanding of patients' individual experiences of living with an illness so it is not falsely assumed that they are not adjusting or managing their disease. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 53(7), 20-23.]. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 07/2015; 53(7):20-23. DOI:10.3928/02793695-20150623-03
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    ABSTRACT: A head-to-head debate published in The BMJ was centered on the question "Does long-term use of psychiatric drugs cause more harm than good?" One of the debaters stated that virtually all psychotropic drug use could be stopped without deleterious effects, claiming that these drugs have minimal benefits, are immensely harmful, and cause more than 500,000 deaths each year. In the current article, this conclusion is disputed by the discussion of the history of psychiatric therapeutics, limitations of research investigations, inherent morbidity and mortality associated with mental disorders, and importance of direct care experience with psychiatric patients and their families. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 53(7), 15-19.]. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 07/2015; 53(7):15-19. DOI:10.3928/02793695-20150618-01
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    ABSTRACT: The 1.5 million older adults who self-identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) are expected to double in number by 2030. Research suggests that health disparities are closely linked with societal stigma, discrimination, and denial of civil and human rights. More LGBT older adults struggle with depression, substance abuse, social isolation, and acceptance compared to their heterosexual counterparts. Despite individual preferences, most health care providers recognize the right of any individual to have access to basic medical services. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services requires that all hospitals receiving funds from Medicare and Medicaid respect visitation and medical decision-making rights to all individuals identifying as LGBT. The Joint Commission also requires a non-discrimination statement for accreditation. The current literature review examines LGBT health disparities and the consequential psychosocial impact on LGBT older adults as well as brings awareness to the needs of this underserved and underrepresented population. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 53(7), 25-30.]. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 07/2015; 53(7):25-30. DOI:10.3928/02793695-20150623-04
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    ABSTRACT: An estimated 2.3 to 3.5 million individuals are homeless in the United States, many of whom have chronic medical and mental illnesses. Underserved individuals who are homeless experience gaps in services, resulting in poor health care outcomes and readmission to the hospital setting, often presenting in crisis through the emergency department. The financial state of hospitals is negatively impacted by the burden of patients returning to the hospital due to unresolved issues. The current article presents the role of a psychiatric-mental health nurse practitioner as part of a pilot program, Opportunity Village Mobile Health, that provides a comprehensive approach to meet the physical and mental health challenges of homeless individuals who are discharged from inpatient to outpatient services. Continuity of health care services are made available to this unique patient population to reduce hospital readmission rates and provide much needed transitional care. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 53(7), 38-43.]. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 07/2015; 53(7):38-43. DOI:10.3928/02793695-20150615-01
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    ABSTRACT: Assertive community treatment (ACT) for individuals with serious mental illness is a community-based mental health service model where nurses play a significant leadership role as health and wellness educators and consultants to consumers and fellow staff members. The ACT model was designed to include a vocational focus as an important aspect of community integration. Nevertheless, research suggests that ACT does not assist a significant number of consumers in achieving employment goals. Nurses can play a critical part in the recovery and wellness of individuals receiving ACT services. Individual placement and support principles provide a foundation for implementing employment into current services. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 53(7), 31-37.]. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 07/2015; 53(7):31-37. DOI:10.3928/02793695-20150623-05
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the current study was to determine the most prevalent sources of stress among first-year nursing students at a military college in Jordan. A descriptive cross-sectional study was performed using a convenience sample of 138 students (females between ages 18 and 22). The Student Stress Survey was used to identify stressors and assess their relative importance. The instrument consists of 40 items divided into four categories of potential sources of stress: (a) intrapersonal, (b) interpersonal, (c) academic, and (d) environmental. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. The top five sources of stress reported were: increased class workload (89%), change in living environment (83%), change in social activities (78%), change in eating habits (77.5 %), and change in sleeping habits (76%), with academic sources of stress being the most frequently reported. The results provide valuable information for educators and administrators in nursing colleges to identify types of stress among first-year nursing students and establish strategies to reduce stress among such students, particularly from academic and environmental sources. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 53(6), 37-43.]. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 06/2015; 53(6):37-43. DOI:10.3928/02793695-20150522-01
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    ABSTRACT: Health care providers are challenged by the presentation and management of inpatients experiencing substance withdrawal delirium (SWD) and delirium. The current Delphi study used an expert panel to develop a clinical competency checklist for nurse and physician educator use in teaching health care providers about the initial care of patients with SWD or delirium. The checklist includes categories of patient safety, history and information gathering, physical examination and assessment, treatment plan, and patient/family-centered care. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 53(6), 29-36.]. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 06/2015; 53(6):29-36. DOI:10.3928/02793695-20150526-01
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    ABSTRACT: The current pre-/posttest pilot study recruited homeless women from "safe" car parks and transitional housing to evaluate the use of mantram in regard to insomnia. At baseline, study participants completed measures of cognitive function, depression, and the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI). In 40 minutes, women were taught three skills of the Mantram Repetition Program (MRP) in the natural environment: (a) silently repeating a mantram several times, several times per day; (b) repeating the mantram slowly every night before sleep; and (c) focusing full attention on the mantram during repetitions. One week later, participants completed a second ISI. Of the 29 women recruited, 83% completed 1-week follow up. After 1 week, 88% were using their mantram daily and one half were using it prior to sleep. Insomnia severity significantly decreased (p = 0.03), with a mean difference of 2.36 (SD = 4.75). The practice of MRP, an intervention that is portable and easy to teach, shows significant promise in decreasing insomnia in this unique population. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 53(6), 44-49.]. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 06/2015; 53(6). DOI:10.3928/02793695-20150526-03
  • Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 06/2015; 53(6):13-14. DOI:10.3928/02793695-20150519-01
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    ABSTRACT: Overweight and obesity are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. This is a known problem among individuals with psychiatric illness, which may be partly due to the adverse metabolic effects of certain psychotropic drugs. Melatonin, liraglutide, and naltrexone/bupropion are examples of drugs with different mechanisms of action that have favorable effects on obesity or medication-related weight gain. Melatonin is appropriate to consider for any patient who will be started on a psychotropic drug that is potentially associated with weight gain or other adverse metabolic effects. Liraglutide should also be considered appropriate for use in overweight or obese psychiatric patients, including those with medication-associated weight gain. The use of naltrexone/bupropion may be problematic in patients with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia because of the potential adverse effects of the bupropion component of the combination. All three drugs deserve further dedicated studies in psychiatric patient populations. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 53(6), 19-22.]. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 06/2015; 53(6):19-22. DOI:10.3928/02793695-20150526-02
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    ABSTRACT: Many U.S. Veterans have experienced the burdens of mental illness and suicide. The current article focuses on Veterans who served from 2001-2015. Although combat exposure and suicidal ideation are linked, approximately one half of all suicides among Active Duty service members (who have served since 2001) occurred among those who never deployed. Researchers who sought additional risks for suicide found that Veterans have greater odds of adversities in childhood than the general population. Adverse childhood experiences are stressful and traumatic experiences, including abuse and neglect, as well as witnessing household dysfunction, or growing up with individuals with mental illness or substance abuse. Further, childhood physical abuse has been shown to be a significant predictor for posttraumatic stress disorder and suicide. Adverse childhood experiences confer additional risk for the mental health of service members. Psychiatric nursing implications include the importance of assessing early childhood adversity during psychosocial assessments. Providing trauma-informed strategies for treatment is an essential element of psychiatric nursing care. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 53(6), 23-26.]. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 06/2015; 53(6):23-26. DOI:10.3928/02793695-20150527-55
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    ABSTRACT: Cannabinoids are the most commonly used illegal substances in the world. Spice and K2 are synthetic cannabinoid (SC) products that contain a mixture of herbs and plant matter combined with synthetic compounds similar to tetrahydrocannabinol, the psychoactive component of cannabis. Because the effects of Spice and K2 are similar to cannabis, many users are smoking these products as legal substitutes despite package labeling that they are not designed for human consumption. These SC products appeal to users because they are easily accessible and not readily detected in standard urine drug screens. The active components in SC products are highly potent and poorly characterized. Use of these agents has been associated with serious psychological and physiological side effects. Because abuse of SC products has become a national public health issue, nurses should be aware of the effects of SC compounds and must take a lead role in educating patients about the dangers of their use. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 53(5), 36-43.]. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 05/2015; 53(5):36-43. DOI:10.3928/02793695-20150422-01
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    ABSTRACT: Alcohol use disorder is an important public health problem for which evidence-based treatments should be used. In the current article, two recent publications related to this topic (i.e., a featured article from The Atlantic and a brief guide from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration [SAMHSA]) are critically evaluated. Both publications emphasize that evidence-based medications are underused for the treatment of alcohol use disorder. The featured article was critical of faith-based Alcoholics Anonymous(®) 12-step programs, but the critique was not based on a sound evaluation of research pertaining to their use. The brief guide prepared for SAMHSA was developed by a scientific consensus panel reviewing current evidence of the effectiveness of available medications, but focused only on those that have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for this indication, neglecting to describe potentially effective off-label use of other FDA-approved medications. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 53(5), 11-14.]. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 05/2015; 53(5):11-4. DOI:10.3928/02793695-20150427-01