Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services (J PSYCHOSOC NURS MEN )

Journal description

The Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services is the only monthly peer-reviewed publication for mental health nurses in clinical, academic, and research positions in a variety of community and institutional settings. The Journal provides the most up-to-date, practical information available for today's psychosocial nurse. Original articles and regular features are presented in a full-color magazine format. In addition to full-length scholarly articles, the Journal publishes short articles about new clinical approaches; new ways to organize departments, develop programs, or motivate staff; first-person accounts; and opinion pieces.

Current impact factor: 0.87

Impact Factor Rankings

2015 Impact Factor Available summer 2015
2013 / 2014 Impact Factor 0.873
2012 Impact Factor 0.825
2011 Impact Factor 0.48
2010 Impact Factor 0.528
2009 Impact Factor 0.707

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 0.78
Cited half-life 5.90
Immediacy index 0.10
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.18
Website Journal of Psychosocial Nursing & Mental Health Services website
Other titles Journal of psychosocial nursing and mental health services
ISSN 0279-3695
OCLC 7816794
Material type Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The dramatic increase in the number of older adults in our society is creating greater demand for age-appropriate health care services. Because older adults use proportionally more emergency services than any other age group, it is important to address problems and find solutions to emergency care for this vulnerable population. Older adults often need specialized care to meet complex physical and psychological needs in an emergency department (ED). A new focus on establishing geriatric EDs holds promise for reducing barriers to ED access and decreasing suboptimal outcomes. Recently published geriatric ED guidelines provide health care professionals with recommendations to systematically improve emergency care for older adults. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, xx(x), xx-xx.]. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 02/2015;
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    ABSTRACT: InSHAPE (Self Help Action Plan for Empowerment), an exercise and nutrition wellness program, is gaining national recognition for its success in helping individuals with serious mental illness (SMI) improve physical fitness and dietary habits. Although gains have been reported in objective measures of fitness as participants progressed through the year-long program, there is little information about what happens with participants after program completion. To address this gap in knowledge, the authors conducted a longitudinal qualitative study in which 11 InSHAPE participants were interviewed both near the end of their year in the program and 9 months later. Participants identified the trainer's ability to contain their initial feelings of distress and form a working alliance as factors that contributed to their exercise persistence. Current findings suggest that individuals with SMI may need a longer period of time working closely with fitness trainers to sustain physical activity levels achieved during the program. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 53 (2), 46-53.]. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 02/2015; 53(2):46-53.
  • Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 02/2015; 53(2):16-7.
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    ABSTRACT: Starting college is a challenging time for first-year students and is often accompanied by emotions such as depression, which can negatively affect academic performance and quality of life. This descriptive correlational study examined stress, coping, depressive symptomology, spirituality, and social support in a convenience sample of first-year students (N = 188) from two private colleges. Results indicated that 45% of students demonstrated greater than average levels of stress and 48% reported clinically significant depressive symptomology. Significant relationships existed between depressive symptoms and stress (p < 0.01) and depressive symptoms and social support (p < 0.01). Less social support was associated with more stress (p < 0.01). The results suggested that interventions targeting stress reduction in first-year students should be considered for decreasing depressive symptoms to enhance their college experience. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 53(2), 38-44.]. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 02/2015; 53(2):38-44.
  • Article: What's New?
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 02/2015; 53(2):13-5.
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    ABSTRACT: It is essential to recognize the relationship between mind and body when providing holistic, client-centered care. The need for an improved care delivery system is highlighted by the health inequity experienced by those with severe mental illness (SMI). Clinical guidelines on physical health monitoring for those with SMI are condition-specific and do not focus on prevention. Health status data on clients with SMI suggest that barriers exist to the delivery of holistic care. Clients with SMI may benefit from a collaborative care model, holistic approaches, and preventive health monitoring. The mental health advanced practice nurse is pivotal in providing quality care to limit the burden of disease and promote health. The following literature review describes models of care aimed at reducing the comorbidity of physical and mental illness in outpatient care settings. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 53(2), 32-37.]. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 02/2015; 53(2):32-7.
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    ABSTRACT: A potential adverse effect of some psychiatric medications is an abnormally prolonged corrected QT (QTc) interval and an increased risk of developing Torsade de Pointes (TdP), which is associated with sudden death. Because antidepressant and antipsychotic drug use is increasing and rates of sudden cardiac death are decreasing, the proportion of sudden cardiac death cases that may be attributed to these drugs is likely to be exceedingly small compared to other risk factors. A comprehensive review of the published literature has concluded that there is little evidence that psychotropic drug-associated QTc interval prolongation by itself is sufficient to predict TdP. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 53 (2), 23-25.]. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 02/2015; 53(2):23-5.
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    ABSTRACT: The current article provides a basic literature review on high energy drinks (HED), with and without alcohol, and presents the results of surveys completed by samples of psychiatric nurses and college students. The nurses' responses, including knowledge, attitudes, and practices are compared with student sample responses. HED, which have high caffeine contents, have become increasingly popular with teens and young adults. A recent trend documented in the literature is mixing HED with alcohol. Not only are youth and young adults (who are the highest users of these products) unaware of the dangers of such combination use, but faculty, clinicians, and administrators are also uninformed, misinformed, or unaware of the dangers associated with such use. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 53(1), 39-44.]. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 01/2015; 53(1):39-44.
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    ABSTRACT: Seven topics previously described in this column are revisited. The use of quantitative electroencephalography has been shown in a prospective study to be effective for predicting antidepressant treatment response. A novel antidepressant drug, agomelatine, has generated much controversy, and its development for the U.S. market was discontinued. A long awaited revised system for categorizing the safety of medications during pregnancy and lactation has finally been published by the Food and Drug Administration. Dextromethorphan/quinidine, eslicarbazepine acetate, levomilnacipran, and esketamine are recent examples of drugs that were developed based on the complex concepts of chirality and stereochemistry. Lisdexamfetamine, a stimulant drug, failed to show benefit as an augmentation therapy for the treatment of depression. The combination drug naltrexone/bupropion was finally approved as a therapy for obesity, after its cardiovascular safety was confirmed in a prospective premarketing study. Further development of the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist drug mifepristone as a treatment for psychotic depression was stopped based on a large negative trial, but the drug continues to be investigated for other potential psychiatric indications. These examples illustrate how the field of psychopharmacology continues to evolve. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 53(1), 9-12.]. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 01/2015; 53(1):9-12.
  • Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 01/2015; 53(1):3-4.
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    ABSTRACT: Associations were examined between eating disorder symptoms and spiritual well-being in a convenience sample of college students. Undergraduate nursing students at a university in a Mid-Atlantic coastal beach community were recruited for the study. A total of 115 students completed the Spiritual Well-Being Scale (SWBS), the Sick, Control, One Stone, Fat, Food (SCOFF) screening questionnaire, and the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26). Approximately one quarter of students had positive screens for an eating disorder, and 40% admitted to binging/purging. SWBS scores reflected low life satisfaction and a lack of clarity and purpose among students. A significant association was found between EAT-26 scores and SWBS Existential Well-Being (EWB) subscale scores (p = 0.014). SCOFF scores were significantly associated with SWBS EWB scores (p = 0.001). Symptoms of eating disorders were pervasive. Future research that assesses the impact of spiritual factors on eating disorders may help health care providers better understand the unique contributions to the development of eating diorders. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, xx(x), xx-xx.]. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 12/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The Auditory Hallucinations Interview Guide (AHIG) is a 32-item tool that helps psychiatric-mental health (PMH) nurses assess past and current experiences of voice hearers so they can provide more individualized care. AHIG was developed as a research tool but has also been found to be clinically useful in both inpatient and outpatient settings to help voice hearers and nurses develop a shared terminology of auditory hallucinations (AH). Using the AHIG, voice hearers are able to tell their stories in a structured and safe environment, thus encouraging recovery. Through respect and active listening, PMH nurses can communicate unconditional acceptance, caring, and hope for recovery, which helps develop rapport and promote trust in the nurse-patient relationship. Once trust is developed, voice hearers and PMH nurses can work together to find effective strategies for managing AH, including commands to harm self and others. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, xx(x), xx-xx.]. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 12/2014;
  • Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 12/2014; 52(12):3-5.
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    ABSTRACT: Most drugs used in psychiatry are classified according to their initial or main therapeutic indications rather than by their pharmacological profiles. A proposed multi-axial, pharmacologically driven nomenclature system that would reclassify existing psychotropic drugs and provide a framework for classifying new drug compounds is described. The five axes of this system would describe a drug's primary pharmacological target and relevant mechanism; relevant neurotransmitter and mechanism; neurobiological activities; efficacy and side effects; and approved indications. The proposed multi-axial system is a common sense but scientifically informed approach for classifying psychotropic drugs that would be practically useful for prescribers, clinicians, and patients. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 52(12), 13-15.]. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 12/2014; 52(12):13-5.
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    ABSTRACT: Prescription pain medication has proliferated in the United States in the past 10 years, and opioid agents are the second most commonly abused substance in the United States. The opioid class comprises various prescription medications, including hydrocodone, as well as illicit substances, such as opium and heroin. The current article offers an example of one adolescent's history that began as weekend use of prescription opioid agents but expanded to daily use and physical dependence. Currently, a trend exists in which adolescents and young adults are moving from prescription opioid medication to heroin use due to increasing restrictions on prescription opioid agents. Nursing implications and web-based resources for teaching are also presented. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 52 (12), 17-20.]. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 12/2014; 52(12):17-20.
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    ABSTRACT: As the population continues to age and new medical developments make surgery at advanced ages increasingly possible, it is important to consider how older adults tolerate surgery and anesthesia. Considerable evidence shows that older adults have a higher risk of developing postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD), which leads to transient and sometimes long-term cognitive changes that may affect quality of life. Because little is known about how to prevent or treat POCD, it is important that nurses identify ways in which they can intervene to help patients who experience this disorder. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 52 (11), 17-20.].
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 11/2014; 52(11):17-20.
  • Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 11/2014; 52(11):5-6.
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    ABSTRACT: To the extent that genetic factors are associated with the efficacy, tolerability, and safety of different drugs, pharmacogenetic tests may be used to personalize medication treatments for an individual. Pharmacogenetic tests, such as GeneSight Psychotropic and the Genecept Assay, are being marketed directly to patients and prescribers despite a relative lack of evidence to support their clinical validity or utility. Pharmacogenetic testing is potentially useful in certain clinical situations, but its usefulness will depend on the knowledge base of the prescriber to be able to interpret the findings for a particular patient. Proposed guidelines on laboratory developed tests will likely encourage, if not require, evidence for the clinical validity and utility of pharmacogenetic tests before they are approved for marketing. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 52(11), 13-16.].
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 11/2014; 52(11):13-16.