Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services (J PSYCHOSOC NURS MEN)

Publisher: Slack

Journal description

The Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services is the only monthly peer-reviewed publication for mental health nurses in clinical, academic, and research positions in a variety of community and institutional settings. The Journal provides the most up-to-date, practical information available for today's psychosocial nurse. Original articles and regular features are presented in a full-color magazine format. In addition to full-length scholarly articles, the Journal publishes short articles about new clinical approaches; new ways to organize departments, develop programs, or motivate staff; first-person accounts; and opinion pieces.

Current impact factor: 0.87

Impact Factor Rankings

2015 Impact Factor Available summer 2015
2013 / 2014 Impact Factor 0.873
2012 Impact Factor 0.825
2011 Impact Factor 0.48
2010 Impact Factor 0.528
2009 Impact Factor 0.707

Impact factor over time

Impact factor
Year

Additional details

5-year impact 0.78
Cited half-life 5.90
Immediacy index 0.10
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.18
Website Journal of Psychosocial Nursing & Mental Health Services website
Other titles Journal of psychosocial nursing and mental health services
ISSN 0279-3695
OCLC 7816794
Material type Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

Slack

  • Pre-print
    • Author cannot archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 12 months embargo
  • Conditions
    • On Institutional Repositories
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • NIH authors may deposit in PubMed Central after 12 months
    • Must link to publisher version
  • Classification
    ‚Äč white

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: New research is providing health care professionals with evidence for the effectiveness of mindfulness meditation as an intervention for older adults. Recent studies have provided evidence that meditation results in observable changes in brain structure related to memory, sense of self, empathy, and stress. Health care professionals should consider mindfulness training as a helpful intervention for older adults with problems such as depression, anxiety, chronic pain, loneliness, and caregiver burden. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, xx(x), xx-xx.]. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 04/2015; DOI:10.3928/02793695-20150330-01
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of the current study was to describe reintegration experiences of U.S. military nurses returning from deployments in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. A qualitative study using a phenomenological method was conducted. The population comprised nurses who served in the U.S. Army, Navy, or Air Force in Iraq or Afghanistan during 2003-2013, including Active Duty, National Guard, and Reserve nurses. Purposive sampling with Veteran and professional nursing organizations yielded a sample of 35 nurses. Nine themes emerged from analysis: (a) homecoming; (b) renegotiating roles; (c) painful memories of trauma; (d) getting help; (e) needing a clinical change of scenery; (f) petty complaints and trivial whining; (g) military unit or civilian job: support versus lack of support; (h) family and social networks: support versus lack of support; and (i) reintegration: a new normal. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, xx(x), xx-xx.]. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 04/2015; DOI:10.3928/02793695-20150406-01
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    ABSTRACT: Every society has norms that frame the way individuals grieve. These norms also help define significant and insignificant losses. Losses exist within cultures that are not discussed or acknowledged because of social stigma. When the ways individuals grieve, or the losses they endure, go beyond accepted social norms, their grief may be seen as disenfranchised. The current article explores the topic of disenfranchised grief and presents methods that could be used by mental health nurses to help clients who are experiencing disenfranchised grief. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 53(4), 52-57.]. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 04/2015; 53(4):52-7. DOI:10.3928/02793695-20150319-05
  • Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 04/2015; 53(4):13-5. DOI:10.3928/02793695-20150319-01
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    ABSTRACT: Many deployed women Veterans, as described in a previous article, have experienced similar combat exposure as their male counterparts in wars since 1990. Upon reintegration, many Veterans visit civilian health facilities with behavioral health issues, sometimes voicing and/or attempting suicide. Effective nursing assessment and actions are needed to specifically care for this unique population. Any suicide variables (e.g., ideation, attempts, completed) are concerning; therefore, all women Veterans from the Vietnam, Gulf I, Iraq, and Afghanistan wars should be assessed. The first priority is always patient safety. Timely and frequent screening for a variety of risk factors, documented for both men and women Veterans, and women specifically, are important. Symptomology may not become evident for 3 to 15 months into reintegration. Applicable dialogue can recognize changing thoughts, judgment, and behavior patterns. Health promotion efforts, interventions, and resourceful referrals are provided. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 53(4), 33-42.]. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 04/2015; 53(4):33-42. DOI:10.3928/02793695-20150320-01
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    ABSTRACT: Brexpiprazole (also known as OPC-34712 or Lu-AF41156) is a novel molecular compound chemically and structurally similar to aripiprazole. This drug is currently under review by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as a monotherapy for schizophrenia and an adjunct to antidepressant medication for major depressive disorder. Additional clinical trials include studies of brexpiprazole in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder, and for agitation associated with dementia of the Alzheimer's type. Brexpiprazole is an example that illustrates how pharmacological drug diversity may be translated to multipurpose uses. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 53(4), 23-25.]. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 04/2015; 53(4):23-5. DOI:10.3928/02793695-20150323-01
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    ABSTRACT: In 2001, an inpatient psychiatric unit sought to greatly reduce, or even eliminate, the use of seclusion and restraint by initiating the Engagement Model. Despite many changes in management and staff, the model has remained largely intact and effective during the past 13 years. The current article reflects on key clinical interventions and leadership approaches that have helped sustain the culture change undertaken to better serve patients on this unit. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 53(3), 39-45.]. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 03/2015; 53(3):39-45. DOI:10.3928/02793695-20150211-01
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    ABSTRACT: Fumagillin, an antimicrobial compound first isolated in 1949 from the fungus Aspergillus fumigatus, four decades later was unexpectedly found to inhibit angiogenesis. Interest in developing angiogenesis inhibitor drugs as possible treatments for cancer led to the synthesis of analogs of fumagillin. Preclinical studies of various analog drugs confirmed that they inhibited angiogenesis, but they also were associated with weight loss as an adverse effect. Because adipose tissue can grow and regress throughout adulthood, is highly vascularized, and has angiogenic properties, interest in investigating anti-angiogenic agents in animal models of obesity found that fumagillin analogs caused dose-dependent reversible weight reduction and adipose tissue loss. Beloranib, a fumagillin analog that is an angiogenesis inhibitor and associated with decreased adiposity in animals, has been studied in phase I clinical trials for cancer. It is currently being investigated for the treatment of obesity and related conditions. Three phase I and three phase II studies found significant degrees of weight loss and acceptable tolerability for beloranib compared to placebo, justifying further clinical development of the drug for obesity. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 53(3), 13-16.]. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 03/2015; 53(3):13-16. DOI:10.3928/02793695-20150219-01
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    ABSTRACT: Little is known about suicide variables in women Veterans. The authors reviewed numerous applicable health care and military literary sources regarding suicide in this population. The current article describes the surrounding circumstances, military war/conflict culture, and potential effects on women Veterans, including major collection problems with current Veteran data. Women Veterans are increasingly reporting more behavioral health issues (e.g., posttraumatic stress disorder) and attempting suicide upon civilian reintegration. Outcomes from this literature review suggest the importance of nursing advocacy to create better rapport and communication with women Veterans from Vietnam, Gulf I, Iraq, and Afghanistan wars seeking care at civilian health facilities, as some may present with suicidal ideologies. [Journal of Psychosocial and Mental Health Nursing, 53(3), 24-30.]. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 03/2015; 53(3):24-30. DOI:10.3928/02793695-20150220-01
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    ABSTRACT: The current study explored the perspectives of family members of individuals with schizophrenia to identify family needs. Six family members from the National Alliance on Mental Illness participated in a 90-minute focus group to share their perspectives on treatment needs and delivery options and to provide suggestions on needs that might be met using telephone-based treatment. Traditional atheoretical content analysis was performed. Five major themes emerged from the data: (a) isolation, (b) negative emotions, (c) recognition of illness, (d) communication with providers, and (e) problem solving. Findings indicate that families perceive needs that could potentially be met using telephone-based treatments. More research is needed to determine family responses to telephone-based treatment initiatives. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 53(3), 32-38.]. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 03/2015; 53(3):32-38. DOI:10.3928/02793695-20150214-01
  • Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 03/2015; 53(3):3-4. DOI:10.3928/02793695-20150212-01
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    ABSTRACT: The dramatic increase in the number of older adults in our society is creating greater demand for age-appropriate health care services. Because older adults use proportionally more emergency services than any other age group, it is important to address problems and find solutions to emergency care for this vulnerable population. Older adults often need specialized care to meet complex physical and psychological needs in an emergency department (ED). A new focus on establishing geriatric EDs holds promise for reducing barriers to ED access and decreasing suboptimal outcomes. Recently published geriatric ED guidelines provide health care professionals with recommendations to systematically improve emergency care for older adults. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, xx(x), xx-xx.]. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 02/2015; 53(3):1-4. DOI:10.3928/02793695-20150127-01
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    ABSTRACT: InSHAPE (Self Help Action Plan for Empowerment), an exercise and nutrition wellness program, is gaining national recognition for its success in helping individuals with serious mental illness (SMI) improve physical fitness and dietary habits. Although gains have been reported in objective measures of fitness as participants progressed through the year-long program, there is little information about what happens with participants after program completion. To address this gap in knowledge, the authors conducted a longitudinal qualitative study in which 11 InSHAPE participants were interviewed both near the end of their year in the program and 9 months later. Participants identified the trainer's ability to contain their initial feelings of distress and form a working alliance as factors that contributed to their exercise persistence. Current findings suggest that individuals with SMI may need a longer period of time working closely with fitness trainers to sustain physical activity levels achieved during the program. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 53 (2), 46-53.]. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 02/2015; 53(2):46-53. DOI:10.3928/02793695-20150126-05
  • Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 02/2015; 53(2):16-7. DOI:10.3928/02793695-20150126-04
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    ABSTRACT: Starting college is a challenging time for first-year students and is often accompanied by emotions such as depression, which can negatively affect academic performance and quality of life. This descriptive correlational study examined stress, coping, depressive symptomology, spirituality, and social support in a convenience sample of first-year students (N = 188) from two private colleges. Results indicated that 45% of students demonstrated greater than average levels of stress and 48% reported clinically significant depressive symptomology. Significant relationships existed between depressive symptoms and stress (p < 0.01) and depressive symptoms and social support (p < 0.01). Less social support was associated with more stress (p < 0.01). The results suggested that interventions targeting stress reduction in first-year students should be considered for decreasing depressive symptoms to enhance their college experience. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 53(2), 38-44.]. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 02/2015; 53(2):38-44. DOI:10.3928/02793695-20150126-03
  • Article: What's New?
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 02/2015; 53(2):13-5. DOI:10.3928/02793695-20150123-01
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    ABSTRACT: A potential adverse effect of some psychiatric medications is an abnormally prolonged corrected QT (QTc) interval and an increased risk of developing Torsade de Pointes (TdP), which is associated with sudden death. Because antidepressant and antipsychotic drug use is increasing and rates of sudden cardiac death are decreasing, the proportion of sudden cardiac death cases that may be attributed to these drugs is likely to be exceedingly small compared to other risk factors. A comprehensive review of the published literature has concluded that there is little evidence that psychotropic drug-associated QTc interval prolongation by itself is sufficient to predict TdP. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 53 (2), 23-25.]. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 02/2015; 53(2):23-5. DOI:10.3928/02793695-20150122-01
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    ABSTRACT: It is essential to recognize the relationship between mind and body when providing holistic, client-centered care. The need for an improved care delivery system is highlighted by the health inequity experienced by those with severe mental illness (SMI). Clinical guidelines on physical health monitoring for those with SMI are condition-specific and do not focus on prevention. Health status data on clients with SMI suggest that barriers exist to the delivery of holistic care. Clients with SMI may benefit from a collaborative care model, holistic approaches, and preventive health monitoring. The mental health advanced practice nurse is pivotal in providing quality care to limit the burden of disease and promote health. The following literature review describes models of care aimed at reducing the comorbidity of physical and mental illness in outpatient care settings. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 53(2), 32-37.]. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 02/2015; 53(2):32-7. DOI:10.3928/02793695-20150120-01
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    ABSTRACT: The current article provides a basic literature review on high energy drinks (HED), with and without alcohol, and presents the results of surveys completed by samples of psychiatric nurses and college students. The nurses' responses, including knowledge, attitudes, and practices are compared with student sample responses. HED, which have high caffeine contents, have become increasingly popular with teens and young adults. A recent trend documented in the literature is mixing HED with alcohol. Not only are youth and young adults (who are the highest users of these products) unaware of the dangers of such combination use, but faculty, clinicians, and administrators are also uninformed, misinformed, or unaware of the dangers associated with such use. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 53(1), 39-44.]. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 01/2015; 53(1):39-44. DOI:10.3928/02793695-20141218-04