Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services (J PSYCHOSOC NURS MEN )

Description

The Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services is the only monthly peer-reviewed publication for mental health nurses in clinical, academic, and research positions in a variety of community and institutional settings. The Journal provides the most up-to-date, practical information available for today's psychosocial nurse. Original articles and regular features are presented in a full-color magazine format. In addition to full-length scholarly articles, the Journal publishes short articles about new clinical approaches; new ways to organize departments, develop programs, or motivate staff; first-person accounts; and opinion pieces.

  • Impact factor
    0.83
    Show impact factor history
     
    Impact factor
  • 5-year impact
    0.78
  • Cited half-life
    5.90
  • Immediacy index
    0.10
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.18
  • Website
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing & Mental Health Services website
  • Other titles
    Journal of psychosocial nursing and mental health services
  • ISSN
    0279-3695
  • OCLC
    7816794
  • Material type
    Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The legalization of marijuana is a controversial issue with implications for health care providers, policy makers, and society at large. The use of marijuana for medical reasons is accepted in many states. However, legal sale of the drug for non-medical use began for the first time on January 1, 2014, in Colorado, following a relaxation of marijuana restrictions that is unprecedented worldwide. News reports have indicated that sales of the drug have been brisk. Marijuana-infused food products have been unexpectedly popular, exceeding sales projections. Marijuana use is associated with numerous physical and mental disorders and could result in addiction. Evidence suggests its potency has increased since the 1980s. Colorado has established regulations regarding the sale of marijuana for non-medical use, but concerns still exist. The current article offers a discussion of the health, public policy, socioeconomic, and nursing implications of the legalization of marijuana for non-medical use. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, xx(x), xx-xx.].
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 08/2014;
  • Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 08/2014; 52(8):14-15.
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    ABSTRACT: Liver toxicity is the leading reason for withdrawal of marketed drugs and is a common reason for terminating the development of new drugs. Anticonvulsant, antidepressant, and antipsychotic drugs can be associated with significant liver injury or liver failure, but this is relatively rare compared to other non-psychotropic drug classes. More commonly, mild asymptomatic elevations in liver function tests are seen and these are not predictive of progression to more severe liver injury. Laboratory monitoring of liver function before and during treatment is recommended with the use of valproic acid and carbamazepine, but not for other psychotropic drugs, although regular laboratory testing is not a reliable method for detecting or preventing severe liver injury. Clinical monitoring for signs and symptoms suggesting hepatotoxicity or hypersensitivity reactions that affect the liver is more important. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 52(8), 23-26.].
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 08/2014; 52(8):23-26.
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    ABSTRACT: Although police officers protect and secure the safety of citizens everywhere, nurses are the primary guardians of patient safety within the treatment milieu. At New Hampshire Hospital, both nurses and police officers share ownership of this responsibility, depending on the needs that arise specific to each profession. Psychiatric nurses take pride in their ability to de-escalate agitated and potentially aggressive patients; however, times arise when the best efforts of nurses fail, or when a situation requires intervention from police officers. Nurses and police officers at New Hampshire Hospital have worked together for many years to develop a trusting, respectful alliance. This coalition has resulted in a safe, clear, orderly process for transfer of authority from nurses to police during violent, clinically unmanageable psychiatric emergencies. Nurses and police officers work collaboratively toward the common goal of ensuring safety for patients and staff, while also acknowledging the unique strengths of each profession. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, xx(x), xx-xx.].
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Recent research suggests that older adults may gain significant mental health benefits from health resources made available through emerging modern technologies, especially because this population is becoming more Internet savvy. Technology-enhanced interventions for older adults have been shown to be helpful not only for general wellness activities (i.e., exercise), but also to specifically enhance mental health. This article focuses on two types of interventions for mental health: (a) cognitive behavioral therapy for depression and anxiety and (b) assistive technology for individuals with dementia. Nurses should reevaluate their assumptions that older adults fear technology and explore whether different types of modern technology might be effective in enhancing mental health for these clients. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, xx(x), xx-xx.].
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome and associated illness is approximately double in individuals with mental illness compared with the general public. An educational intervention on metabolic syndrome was provided to mental health counselors, who performed intake assessments of patients newly admitted to two outpatient mental health facilities. Researchers of the current study first measured mastery of metabolic syndrome content following the educational intervention; they then conducted a chart audit on new admissions to measure changes in clinician behavior. Prior to the intervention, neither facility screened for metabolic syndrome at intake or referred patients with a body mass index (BMI) >25 for medical evaluation. A paired t test showed no significant difference in the educational pre-posttest scores; however, following the intervention, 53 of 132 patients had a documented BMI >25, and 47 of 53 patients were referred to a primary care provider for evaluation. The current study's findings suggest that mental health counselors who screen for metabolic syndrome and associated illnesses will increase the rate of detection of these chronic conditions. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, xx(x), xx-xx.].
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 07/2014;
  • Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 07/2014; 52(7):3-5.
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    ABSTRACT: As the number of older adults in our society increases, surrogate decision makers are increasingly likely to be called on to make complex, and often agonizing, health care decisions for loved ones. Recent studies of surrogate decision making have described the decision-making process as overwhelming and stressful. Nurses play an important role in helping family members to make meaningful decisions with less stress. Nurses who serve as educators, advocates, and compassionate listeners can help reduce the deleterious effects of surrogates' difficult decisions. It is important that nurses and other health care professionals find effective ways to support surrogates who struggle with making decisions for others. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 52(7), 17-21.].
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 07/2014; 52(7):17-21.
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    ABSTRACT: Drug absorption and metabolism is influenced by age, sex, pharmacogenetic variability, medical comorbidity, concurrent drug use, drug formulation, and route of administration. Drug dissolution typically begins in the stomach, but absorption occurs mainly in the small intestine. Malabsorption syndromes, previous gastrointestinal (GI) surgery, or decreased GI blood flow impair or delay the absorption of orally administered drugs. Decreased drug absorption can occur with certain gastric bypass procedures when the stomach or proximal small intestine is an important absorption site. Drugs undergoing extensive first-pass hepatic metabolism can have increased concentrations and greater systemic effects when administered directly into the jejunum. Non-oral routes of drug administration ordinarily bypass first-pass hepatic metabolism, leading to greater bioavailability and higher concentrations compared with oral administration of the same dose. Metabolic activity is variably reduced with increased age or liver disease severity, but declines in liver function cannot be quantified to determine drug metabolizing capacity. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 52(7), 13-16.].
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 07/2014; 52(7):13-16.
  • Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 07/2014; 52(7):6.
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    ABSTRACT: A tabletop simulation was developed as a patient safety activity that involved checking in a patient admitted to a psychiatric care unit. Students were second-degree (n = 79) and traditional (n = 53) BSN students. They were given suitcases or backpacks containing various items, and following a fictional hospital policy, they had to decide whether to give the items to the patient, place them in a secured area, or send them to the pharmacy or security personnel. The activity was evaluated using the Simulation Effectiveness Tool (SET) and two open-ended questions. Students reported that they found the simulation to be enjoyable and a good learning experience. Checking in a patient's belongings is not an activity students typically perform, but the simulation can help prepare them for situations they will experience in the workplace. This inexpensive activity can easily be adapted for staff orientation and competencies. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, xx(x), xx-xx.].
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The age at which gender dysphoria can be diagnosed with enough certainty to justify medical intervention is controversial. The aim of this article is to explore current literature as it relates to the gender reassignment process and diagnostic indicators supporting an appropriate age for intervention. The timing of diagnosis and treatment of gender dysphoria remains the center of debate between the long-term effects of early intervention versus delay of treatment. Limited research is available on gender dysphoria treatment protocols for children. However, preliminary studies suggest that early intervention improves the quality of life in individuals who are transgender. Ongoing research suggests that it may be possible to confirm gender dysphoria at an earlier age. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, xx(x), xx-xx.].
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Individuals with schizophrenia are often medically undertreated and experience symptoms that interfere with communication and the capacity to make medical decisions. These issues complicate quality end-of-life care for this population and are of particular concern for hospice and palliative care nurses and health care providers. This article presents a case study of a terminally ill patient with schizophrenia. It is divided into a series of vignettes; each vignette presents a common clinical issue encountered by the palliative care team. Interventions suggested in the literature and those used by team members when working with the patient are discussed. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, xx(x), xx-xx.].
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 06/2014;
  • Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 06/2014; 52(6):14-16.
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    ABSTRACT: A potential adverse effect of many non-cardiac drugs, including certain psychotropic medications, is an abnormally prolonged corrected QT (QTc) interval and an increased risk of developing torsade de pointes, a type of tachyarrhythmia associated with sudden death. A relatively recent literature review suggested that haloperidol (Haldol(®)) is more likely to cause QTc prolongation than quetiapine (Seroquel(®)). The current article critically evaluates this literature review by examining the original source studies cited by the authors to support their conclusion. The authors' interpretation and presentation of the findings from the studies they review results in a misleading characterization of the relative risks of haloperidol and quetiapine. Looking at individual study methodologies closely and critically evaluating the findings from each study should be done before drawing generalized conclusions about the actual and comparative risks of various drugs. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 52(6), 23-26.].
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 06/2014; 52(6):23-26.
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    ABSTRACT: The influences on a therapist are many. This article illustrates how a 19th-century novelist, Jane Austen, informs the work of a nurse therapist in the 21st century. The characters in a Jane Austen novel provide perspectives from setting boundaries to handling feelings. Austen's characters promote an acceptance of less attractive qualities in others and in oneself that can benefit the therapy. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, xx(x), xx-xx.].
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Electronic cigarettes, known as "e-cigarettes," were designed as a smoking cessation tool for adults. An unintended audience for the product has been found with adolescents, many of whom have never used conventional cigarettes. Broad consequences of e-cigarettes on adolescent health include nicotine addiction-and later nicotine withdrawal-and potential for nicotine overdose. U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations are non-existent; empirical evidence regarding e-cigarettes is limited; and studies conducted with adolescent e-cigarette use are even less common. Prevention measures must target the manufacturers and retailers of these devices as well as adolescents, parents, schools, and health care professionals. Psychiatric-mental health nurses are well positioned to raise awareness of the dangerous consequences of e-cigarette use in teens. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, xx(x), xx-xx.].
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 05/2014;
  • Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 05/2014; 52(5):5-6.
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    ABSTRACT: Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) are classified in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition, as a functional neurological symptom disorder. This disorder is often misdiagnosed as epilepsy, with the consequence that older adults may have been treated for years for epilepsy before they learn their seizures are non-epileptic. Video electroencephalography monitoring, which is the standardized approach for ruling out epilepsy, is often performed in a specialized epilepsy monitoring unit where the patient lies in bed 24 hours per day waiting for a seizure to be recorded. The immobility, loss of independence, and anxiety that occurs during the monitoring process can be difficult for older adults. It is important for all nurses to be aware of PNES and to be sensitive to the unique needs of older adults who are experiencing these seizures. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 52(5), 17-20.].
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 05/2014; 52(5):17-20.
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    ABSTRACT: Delirium is a complex neurobehavioral syndrome caused by dysregulation of brain activity, characterized by an alteration in the level of attention and awareness, which develops over a short period of time and is seen as a change from the patient's baseline. Dysregulation of 24-hour circadian cycles, including melatonin secretion or activity, has suggested the potential therapeutic use of melatonergic drugs for delirium. Melatonin and the melatonin analog drug ramelteon have been shown to be effective in the prevention of delirium in three controlled studies. Additional studies using these drugs are warranted. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 52(5), 13-16.].
    Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services 05/2014; 52(5):13-6.

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