Wetlands (WETLANDS )

Publisher: Society of Wetland Scientists (U.S.)

Description

Wetlands is an international journal concerned with all aspects of wetlands biology, ecology, hydrology, water chemistry, soil and sediment characteristics, management, and laws and regulations. The journal is published quarterly, with the goal of centralizing the publication of pioneering wetlands work that is otherwise spread among a myriad of journals. Since wetlands research usually requires an interdisciplinary approach, the journal in not limited to specific disciplines but seeks manuscripts reporting research results from all relevant disciplines. Journal of The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  • Impact factor
    1.28
    Show impact factor history
     
    Impact factor
  • 5-year impact
    1.80
  • Cited half-life
    8.70
  • Immediacy index
    0.30
  • Eigenfactor
    0.01
  • Article influence
    0.57
  • Website
    Wetlands website
  • Other titles
    Wetlands (Wilmington, N. C.: Online), Wetlands
  • ISSN
    0277-5212
  • OCLC
    47723678
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publications in this journal

  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Respiration in tidal marshes plays an important role in the global carbon cycle, but is little investigated in Asia. In this study, ecosystem respiration in three brackish marshes dominated by Spartina alterniflora (smooth cordgrass), Phragmites australis (common reed) and Cyperus malaccensis (shichito matgrass) were examined monthly during 2009 in the subtropical tidal wetland of the Min River estuary of southeast China. Measurements were taken before and after tidal inundation. Soil porewater CO2 concentrations at soil depths of 5 and 10 cm were also measured. Differences in ecosystem respiration before and after tidal inundation stages were statistically indistinguishable in each vegetation type on an annual scale but differed by month. Monthly variation in ecosystem respiration was apparent and overall respiration in P. australis stand had the highest respiration of the vegetation types. Monthly average CO2 concentration in soil porewater did not differ significantly between the two depths. Ecosystem respiration in P. australis and C. malaccensis stands had a significant positive correlation with soil and air temperature, and a significant negative correlation with soil pH in S. alterniflora and C. malaccensis stands. Our results suggested that the brackish marsh ecosystem of subtropical estuary emits CO2 to the atmosphere at relatively higher level, but the emission pattern did not differ before and after tides.
    Wetlands 04/2014; 34(2).
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Constructed wetlands are engineered systems relying on natural microbial, biological, physical and chemical processes to treat wastewater. Treatment performance tends to decrease in colder temperatures, so that ways to enhance the performance in northern climates has been sought. In China, the first constructed wetland was built in China in 1987 and since then, about 450 systems have been constructed throughout the country. At least 67 constructed wetlands are located in northern China and have reported significant seasonal changes of treatment efficiencies. This paper reviews current engineering practices including case studies showing ways to increase winter treatment effectiveness in cold climates. These measures include: (1) internal improvement of system design and setup of the system, (2) optimization of winter operation, and (3) external incorporation of pre- and post-treatment technologies. Various measures to raise the temperatures of these systems in the winter were compared in several constructed wetlands (40 and 50°N). For example, plastic film mulch can be used with thermal insulation; however, the operators of constructed wetlands often use ice to cover the system due to lower cost and maintenance. This review demonstrates that the effectiveness of constructed wetlands in cold climates can be improved through better operation strategies.
    Wetlands 04/2014;
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Growing awareness of essential wetland functions is providing support for wetland construction projects. Biomonitoring using invertebrates is a common way to evaluate project success, but relationships between wetland invertebrates and environmental factors are often weak. In recently constructed wetlands on Maryland’s Eastern Shore, we tested the hypothesis that focusing on predator and primary consumer invertebrate assemblages versus the entire community would elucidate stronger relationships with environmental factors. Despite variation in factors that are hypothesized to control wetland invertebrates (e.g., vegetation and tendency to dry), our results indicated weak relationships between environmental factors and the structure and composition of the entire community as well as predator and primary consumer assemblages separately. Examining the entire community and individual assemblages, however, showed that invertebrates were influenced by temporal factors. We propose that a complex interaction between wetland shape/size, local weather, and seasonal changes may have driven invertebrate community patterns among wetlands. Such interactions would complicate bioassessments of wetlands that differ in size, hydrology, and local weather conditions. Further study of specific factors controlling wetland invertebrates and developing new metrics that incorporate seasonal environmental change could improve biomonitoring results and thus management strategies aimed at enhancing wetland function.
    Wetlands 04/2014; 34(2).
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A new process-based simulation model to estimate methane emissions from Amazon floodplain ecosystems is described and evaluated in comparison to independent measurements of methane fluxes. The model’s three major components are 1) types of wetland vegetation and the changes in water level, temperature and dissolved oxygen of flooded areas, 2) plant production, biomass accumulation, and litterfall decay in soils and sediments, and 3) methane production and transport pathways through the water column and into the atmosphere. Ecological and limnological data from Lake Calado, a well-studied site in the central Amazon basin, were used to develop the model. One set of model simulations were generated for floating macrophytes. Predicted rates of CH4 emission to the atmosphere by all simulated transfer pathways were typically in the range of 0.25 to 0.33 g C m−2 day−1. Simulated CH4 emissions from flooded forests were predicted to be around 0.25 g m−2 day−1, nearly all by ebullition. These rates compare favorably to rates measured in Amazon floodplain habitats.
    Wetlands 03/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Dyke Marsh, a distal tidal marsh along the Potomac River estuary, is diminishing rapidly in areal extent. This study documents Dyke Marsh erosion rates from the early-1860s to the present during pre-mining, mining, and post-mining phases. From the late-1930s to the mid-1970s, Dyke Marsh and the adjacent shallow riverbottom were mined for gravel, resulting in a ~55 % initial loss of area. Marsh loss continued during the post-mining phase (1976–2012). Causes of post-mining loss were unknown, but were thought to include Potomac River flooding. Post-mining areal-erosion rates increased from 0.138 ha yr−1 (~0.37 ac yr−1) to 0.516 ha yr−1 (~1.67 ac yr−1), and shoreline-erosion rates increased from 0.76 m yr−1 (~2.5 ft yr−1) to 2.60 m yr−1 (~8.5 ft yr−1). Results suggest the accelerating post-mining erosion reflects a process-driven feedback loop, enabled by the marsh's severely-altered geomorphic and hydrologic baseline system; the primary post-mining degradation process is wave-induced erosion from northbound cyclonic storms. Dyke Marsh erosion rates are now comparable to, or exceed, rates for proximal coastal marshes in the same region. Persistent and accelerated erosion of marshland long after cessation of mining illustrates the long-term, and potentially devastating, effects that temporally-restricted, anthropogenic destabilization can have on estuarine marsh systems.
    Wetlands 12/2013; 33(6).
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We measured daily precipitation, duration of ponding and soil redox potential for 2 years in three coastal prairie sites near the mouth of the Rio Grande in south Texas. The area historically was dominated by gulf cordgrass, Spartina spartinae. Much of the area was plowed for agriculture and Spartina has not recolonized disturbed sites. Regulation of the Rio Grande has eliminated flooding and disconnected the study area from the river. The goal of this project was to use continuous measures of water levels and soil redox potential to determine whether the study areas have a wetland hydrologic regime. Anoxic soils formed and persisted for at least 2 weeks only following hurricanes or large tropical storms that produced at least 15 cm of precipitation over 1–3 days and created ponding. Over the past century storms of this magnitude occurred only 1 out of 4 years. This study determined that the study sites do not support wetland hydrologic regimes due to river regulation, however reestablishment of the dominant wet prairie species is possible through planting.
    Wetlands 12/2013; 33(6).
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: High-latitude wetlands provide vital ecological functions, many of which rely on the decomposition of plant litter, but little understanding exists of how decomposition rates vary across space, and among common plant species. We investigated the litter decomposition of seven plant species in six wetland ponds on the Copper River Delta (Alaska, USA), and the litter-associated invertebrates. The ponds exist on common geomorphic surfaces of the delta: surfaces created by glacial retreat and outwash, and those resulting from uplifted intertidal area following a powerful 1964 earthquake. An eight-fold range in decomposition rates existed across litter species and correlated with phosphorus (r = 0.63), but not nitrogen and carbon content of the litter. Macroinvertebrate abundance also differed among leaf species. Litter-decay rates did not differ between pond types when expressed on a percent-mass-loss per-day basis; however, on a per-degree-day basis, decomposition in outwash ponds was more rapid. Litter in outwash ponds also had greater invertebrate abundance than uplift ponds, a pattern driven by collector-gatherer chironomids. Invertebrate activity was deemed a minor source of litter-mass loss relative to microbial decomposition. Results suggest that litter-associated invertebrate communities differ between pond types, but that differences in plant-litter decomposition are subtle.
    Wetlands 12/2013; 33(6).
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: White Oak Bayou watershed in the Arkansas River Valley is losing wetlands rapidly that could alter regional carbon cycles. Leaf decomposition of ash and oak were used to assess carbon cycling in five flat and five backwater wetlands within forested (54 %), urban (30 %), and pasture (7 %) catchment. Wetlands were dry in summer and wet the remaining year. Backwaters were expected to have faster decomposition rates from longer wet periods and more nutrients that would increase microbial and macroinvertebrate consumption. Backwaters held more water than flats and decomposition of both tree species was faster in backwaters (k:0.0032 ± 0.0007 day−1) compared to flats (k:0.0026 ± 0.0008 d−1, p = 0.018). Ash (0.0035 ± 0.0006 day−1) decomposed faster than oak (0.0023 ± 0.0005 day−1, p < 0.0001). Variation in ash decomposition rates was explained by inundation time and ammonium concentration. Variation in oak decomposition rates was explained by surrounding forest and nitrite + nitrate concentrations. Minor variations in hydrology affected decomposition rates of fast-breakdown leaf species, while differences in surrounding land use and nutrient concentrations affected rates of slow-breakdown species. Environmental factors altered by changing land use have important consequences for leaf decomposition. This study helps us to understand the influence that anthropogenic changes have on wetland function as urbanization continues to encroach upon wetlands in Arkansas.
    Wetlands 12/2013; 33(6).
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    ABSTRACT: Detailed carbon budgets from 2008 to 2010 were created for two 1-ha flow-through riverine wetlands created in 1994 adjacent to a third–order stream in central Ohio. Measurements were taken of dissolved non-purgeable organic carbon (NPOC), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), fine particulate organic carbon (FPOM), and coarse particulate organic carbon (CPOM). Methane emissions, soil sequestration, aquatic primary productivity, and macrophyte aboveground net primary productivity were also included in the carbon budget. The carbon budget successfully balanced inputs (1838 ± 41 g C m−2 year−1) and export/sequestration (1846 ± 59 g C m−2 year−1) with only a 0.5 % over estimation of export in relation to input; 12.8 % of the inflow was sequestered into the wetland soil. FPOM and CPOM concentrations and exports were positively correlated with hydrologic flow under most circumstances; NPOC and DIC concentrations were usually negatively or poorly correlated with hydrologic flow. In all seasons, except winter, the change of total carbon (NPOC, DIC, FPOM, and CPOM) concentration between inflow and outflow increased with increased hydrologic flow. Although carbon concentrations increased from inflow to outflow, the total surface water export of carbon is less than the inflow due to groundwater recharge from these perched wetlands.
    Wetlands 12/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: Freezing-thawing in mid-high latitudes is an important factor controlling nutrient dynamics. We transplanted peatland columns (TQ) and freshwater marsh columns (SJ) in different latitudes into south seasonal frozen regions to determine the responses of greenhouse gas emissions from different wetlands to the freezing-thawing under climate warming. The decrease in CO2 and CH4 emissions during freezing stage were interrupted by a short emission peak. While N2O uptake rate reduced with decreasing temperature. In the thawing stage, all the three greenhouse gases exhibited emission peaks. CO2 were 159.83 mg m−2 h−1 (TQ) and 86.83 mg m−2 h−1 (SJ); CH4 were 1.32 mg m−2 h−1 (TQ) and 4.07 mg m−2 h−1 (SJ); N2O were 72.14 ug m−2 h−1 (TQ) and 22.15 ug m−2 h−1 (SJ). Meanwhile, N2O transferred from sink into source. With temperature increase, the emission rate of CO2 increased fast, while CH4 and N2O decreased. CO2 emission during freezing-thawing periods was significantly correlated with soil temperature and CH4 emission. Soil active organic carbon also played important roles in greenhouse gases emissions. Our study suggested that more greenhouse gases may release from wetlands into atmosphere in the context of global warming, and the potential release of CO2 and N2O during freezing-thawing periods was much higher in peatlands of permafrost zone.
    Wetlands 12/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: There are important limitations in interpreting satellite imagery in dynamic environments. In forested wetlands, where flooding and aquatic vegetation vary temporally, a multitemporal approach is needed for extracting stable patterns. We used field measurements of forest composition and structure and seven cloud-free Landsat images from a time span of six years to classify forest vigor in 95,000 ha of cypress-tupelo forested wetlands surrounding Lake Verret in southern Louisiana. A principal component (PCA) ordination of the reflectance in Landsat bands 3/4/5 for each image was the basis of the classification. No single Landsat band or image dominated the first few PCs, so that the multitemporal and multispectral aspect of the data were fully expressed in the ordination. Each Landsat pixel was classified as to forest vigor according to its scores in the first two PCs by comparing pixel scores to those associated with field plots. The reflectance PCA, and thus the classification, was directly interpretable in terms of ecosystem structure because the scored in the first two PCs in field-plot pixels were correlated to field measurements of forest structure, such as leaf area index, stand density, and understory composition, and because the field plots occupied interpretable regions of ordination space.
    Wetlands 12/2013; 33(6).
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We analyzed trends in time series of the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) from multitemporal satellite imagery for 2001–2010 over the southeastern Everglades where major changes in vegetation structure and type have been associated with sea-level rise and reduced freshwater flow since the 1940s. Non-parametric trend analysis using the Theil-Sen slope revealed that 84.4 % of statistically significant trends in NDVI were negative, mainly concentrated in scrub mangrove, sawgrass (Cladium jamaicense) and spike rush (Eleocharis cellulosa) communities within 5 km of the shoreline. Observed trends were consistent with trends in sawgrass biomass measurements made from 1999 to 2010 in three Long-term Ecological Research (LTER) sites within our study area. A map of significant trends overlaid on a RapidEye high-resolution satellite image showed large patches of negative trends parallel to the shoreline in and around the “white zone,” which corresponds to a low-productivity band that has moved inland over the past 70 years. Significantly positive trends were observed mainly in the halophytic prairie community where highly salt tolerant species are typically found. Taken as a whole, the results suggest that increased saline intrusion associated with sea-level rise continues to reduce the photosynthetic biomass within freshwater and oligohaline marsh communities of the southeastern Everglades.
    Wetlands 10/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: North American wetlands have been invaded by an introduced lineage of the common reed, Phragmites australis. Native lineages occur in North America, but many populations have been extirpated by the introduced conspecific lineage. Little is known about how subtle changes in plant lineage may affect methane (CH4) emissions. Native and introduced Phragmites were grown under current and predicted future levels of atmospheric CO2 and nitrogen(N) pollution in order to understand how CH4 emissions may vary between conspecific lineages. We found introduced Phragmites emitted more CH4 than native Phragmites, and that CH4 emissions increased significantly in both with CO2+N treatment. There was no significant difference in CH4 production potentials, but CH4 oxidation potentials were higher in soils from the introduced lineage. Intraspecific plant responses to resource availability changed CH4 emissions, with plant density, root mass, and leaf area being significantly positively correlated with higher emissions. The absence of CO2-only or N-only effects highlights a limitation on the generalization that CH4 emissions are proportional to plant productivity. Our data suggest that intraspecific changes in plant community composition have important implications for greenhouse emissions. Furthermore, global change-enhanced invasion by introduced Phragmites may increase CH4 emissions unless these factors cause a compensatory increase in carbon sequestration.
    Wetlands 08/2013; 33(4).

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