The American journal of occupational therapy.: official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AM J OCCUP THER )

Publisher: American Occupational Therapy Association

Description

AJOT is an official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc. AJOT is a peer-reviewed journal that focuses on research, practice, and health care issues in the field of occupational therapy. The journal publishes articles that are theoretical and conceptual and that represent theory-based research, research reviews, and applied research related to innovative program approaches, educational activities, and professional trends.

  • Impact factor
    1.70
  • 5-year impact
    2.01
  • Cited half-life
    0.00
  • Immediacy index
    1.57
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.35
  • Website
    American Journal of Occupational Therapy website
  • Other titles
    The American journal of occupational therapy, AJOT
  • ISSN
    0272-9490
  • OCLC
    1480164
  • Material type
    Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Occupational therapy may significantly improve cancer survivors' ability to participate in activities, thereby improving quality of life. Little is known, however, about the use of occupational therapy services by adults with cancer. The objective of this study was to understand what shapes patterns of occupational therapy use to help improve service delivery. We examined older (age >65 yr) adults diagnosed with breast, prostate, lung, or melanoma (skin) cancer between 2004 and 2007 (N = 27,131) using North Carolina Central Cancer Registry data linked to Medicare billing claims. Survivors who used occupational therapy within 1 yr before their cancer diagnosis were more likely to use occupational therapy after diagnosis but also experienced the highest levels of comorbidities. Survivors with Stage 4 cancers or lung cancer were less likely to use occupational therapy. These findings suggest possible disparities in utilization of occupational therapy by older adults with cancer.
    The American journal of occupational therapy.: official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association 09/2014; 68(5):597-607.
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    ABSTRACT: This study investigated the validity of sensory systems as distinct measurable constructs as part of a larger project examining Ayres's theory of sensory integration. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was conducted to test whether sensory questionnaire items represent distinct sensory system constructs. Data were obtained from clinical records of two age groups, 2- to 5-yr-olds (n = 231) and 6- to 10-yr-olds (n = 223). With each group, we tested several CFA models for goodness of fit with the data. The accepted model was identical for each group and indicated that tactile, vestibular-proprioceptive, visual, and auditory systems form distinct, valid factors that are not age dependent. In contrast, alternative models that grouped items according to sensory processing problems (e.g., over- or underresponsiveness within or across sensory systems) did not yield valid factors. Results indicate that distinct sensory system constructs can be measured validly using questionnaire data.
    The American journal of occupational therapy.: official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association 09/2014; 68(5):546-54.
  • The American journal of occupational therapy.: official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association 09/2014; 68(5):495-9.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article describes the development of the Adult Sensory Processing Scale (ASPS), a sensory processing questionnaire for adults. The ASPS measures self-reported responses to input from distinct sensory systems and is intended to be sensitive to individual differences in the adult population. ASPS construction involved two phases: item development and instrument construction. During item development, content validity of 71 items was assessed by means of expert ratings. During instrument construction, items were evaluated using data from an online survey of 491 adults. Exploratory factor analysis and Rasch analysis yielded an optimal solution of eight factors representing vestibular overresponsiveness, auditory overresponsiveness, visual overresponsiveness, social tactile overresponsiveness, proprioceptive seeking, general underresponsiveness, vestibular-proprioceptive underresponsiveness affecting postural control, and vestibular overresponsiveness-intolerance to movement. The final ASPS contains 39 items and demonstrates acceptable internal consistency, strong content validity, and adequate construct validity.
    The American journal of occupational therapy.: official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association 09/2014; 68(5):531-8.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE. We sought to understand activity choices of older adults when they were depressed. METHOD. Each community-dwelling participant (n = 27) completed one semistructured interview while in recovery for at least 3 mo. but less than 7 mo. Transcripts were coded to identify relevant themes. RESULTS. Six themes emerged that explained activities participants continued while depressed, and four themes described activities they stopped. CONCLUSION. Older adults maintained many instrumental activities of daily living while depressed, and some actively adapted activities so they could continue them. Some intentionally stopped activities to direct limited energy to their highest priority activities. To guide effective intervention, it is critical for occupational therapy practitioners to complete a client-centered qualitative assessment to understand what and, most important, why activities are continued or stopped. Each theme for activities continued and activities stopped lends itself to intervention strategies.
    The American journal of occupational therapy.: official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association 09/2014; 68(5):570-7.
  • The American journal of occupational therapy.: official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association 09/2014; 68(5):500-5.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We extracted 35 articles published between January 2009 and September 2013 in the American Journal of Occupational Therapy (AJOT) that focused on children and youth instrument development and testing, summarized study details and traits of the 37 measures reported in them, and then critiqued the measures. Most of the articles contained Level III evidence (one-group nonrandomized and noncontrolled). The most common types of reliability reported in the articles were internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and interrater reliability; the most frequent types of validity reported were discriminant validity and construct validity. Most pediatric assessment tools were designed for school-age children between ages 5 and 12 yr. The two most common purposes for the assessments were reported as descriptive and discriminative. The continued publication of instruments that measure children and youth participation in meaningful occupations and life roles in home, school, and community environments is recommended.
    The American journal of occupational therapy.: official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association 09/2014; 68(5):e154-216.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study established interrater reliability and preliminary developmental score guidelines for preschool children (ages 3-5 yr) on the Motor Planning Maze Assessment (MPMA). We administered the MPMA to 80 typically developing preschoolers and found age effects for Time, Error, and Total scores for each of three mazes. Five-year-olds obtained lower (better) scores than 4-yr-olds, who scored lower than 3-yr-olds. Older children completed the mazes with significantly fewer errors in significantly less time than younger children. Interrater reliability was excellent on the total MPMA score (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.96) and individual maze scores (0.90-0.98). Results of this study provide evidence that the MPMA can serve as a reliable, objective screening of a preschooler's ability to plan and execute motor movements. A larger reference population is needed to increase generalizability.
    The American journal of occupational therapy.: official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association 09/2014; 68(5):539-45.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE. Sensory modulation issues have a significant impact on participation in daily life. Moreover, understanding phenotypic variation in sensory modulation dysfunction is crucial for research related to defining homogeneous groups and for clinical work in guiding treatment planning. We thus evaluated the new Sensory Processing Scale (SPS) Assessment. METHOD. Research included item development, behavioral scoring system development, test administration, and item analyses to evaluate reliability and validity across sensory domains. RESULTS. Items with adequate reliability (internal reliability >.4) and discriminant validity (p < .01) were retained. Feedback from the expert panel also contributed to decisions about retaining items in the scale. CONCLUSION. The SPS Assessment appears to be a reliable and valid measure of sensory modulation (scale reliability >.90; discrimination between group effect sizes >1.00). This scale has the potential to aid in differential diagnosis of sensory modulation issues.
    The American journal of occupational therapy.: official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association 09/2014; 68(5):522-30.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article presents the current state of measurement in the area of sensory integration within the field of occupational therapy in three areas: (1) phenotypic characterization, (2) intervention adherence and dosage, and (3) outcome measurement. The need for additional measurement tools in all three areas is addressed. In regard to outcome measurement of occupational therapy using sensory integration, the use of both qualitative and quantitative methods to obtain outcome data is recommended. Further, a strategy is recommended for obtaining outcome data from direct report from the child or other stakeholder.
    The American journal of occupational therapy.: official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association 09/2014; 68(5):e149-53.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE. We examined participation in goal planning and development of self-awareness for people with impaired self-awareness after traumatic brain injury. METHOD. We performed a mixed-methods study of 8 participants recently discharged from inpatient rehabilitation. Self-awareness was measured using discrepancy between self and significant other ratings on the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Index (MPAI-4) at four time points. We calculated effect size to evaluate the change in MPAI-4 discrepancy over time. RESULTS. Seven participants identified their own goals. We found a large reduction in mean MPAI-4 discrepancy (M = 8.57, SD = 6.59, N = 7, d = 1.08) in the first 6 wk and a further small reduction (M = 5.33, SD = 9.09, N = 6, d = 0.45) in the second 6 wk of intervention. Case data indicated that 7 participants demonstrated some growth in self-awareness. CONCLUSION. Engagement in occupation-based, goal-directed rehabilitation appeared to foster awareness of injury-related changes to varying extents.
    The American journal of occupational therapy.: official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association 09/2014; 68(5):578-88.
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a safe patient handling and mobility (SPHM) program on patient self-care outcomes. METHOD. We used a retrospective cohort design. Data were obtained from the electronic medical records of 1,292 patients receiving inpatient rehabilitation services. Self-care scores from the FIM™ for patients who participated in rehabilitation before implementation of an SPHM program were compared with the scores of patients who participated after implementation of the program. RESULTS. Patients who received inpatient rehabilitation services with an SPHM program were as likely to achieve at least modified independence in self-care as those who received inpatient rehabilitation services without an SPHM program. CONCLUSION. SPHM programs may not affect self-care performance in adults receiving inpatient rehabilitation services. However, more work must be done to define specific and effective methods for integrating patient handling technologies into occupational therapy practice.
    The American journal of occupational therapy.: official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association 09/2014; 68(5):589-96.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study examined the reliability and validity of the structural section of the Ayres Sensory Integration® Fidelity Measure© (ASIFM), which provides a method for monitoring the extent to which an intervention was implemented as conceptualized in studies of occupational therapy using sensory integration intervention methods (OT-SI). We examined the structural elements of the measure, including content of assessment reports, availability of specific equipment and adequate space, safety monitoring, and integration of communication with parents and other team members, such as collaborative goal setting with parents or family and teacher education, into the intervention program. Analysis of self-report ratings by 259 occupational therapists from 185 different facilities indicated that the structural section of the ASIFM has acceptable interrater reliability (r ≥ .82) and significantly differentiates between settings in which therapists reportedly do and do not practice OT-SI (p < .001).
    The American journal of occupational therapy.: official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association 09/2014; 68(5):506-13.
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    ABSTRACT: Praxis is the ability of the brain to develop an idea for action and plan, organize, and execute unfamiliar motor actions. It enables purposeful interaction with people and things in the environment. Ideation is central to praxis but has been little researched. This study investigated the reliability of the Test of Ideational Praxis (TIP) and examined ideational praxis in typical preschoolers. TIP performance for 78 preschoolers ages 3, 4, and 5 yr was videotaped and scored by two trained raters. The TIP has strong interrater reliability, supporting earlier findings. Further, we documented test-retest stability over 2 wk. As a group, preschoolers identified 10.6 affordances (ideas) for action on the TIP; no age differences were found. Training is required for accurate scoring of the TIP; following training, clinicians and researchers may find the TIP a useful tool to screen motor ideational abilities in young children.
    The American journal of occupational therapy.: official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association 09/2014; 68(5):555-61.
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE. We investigated the feasibility of delivering an individualized, progressive, high-repetition upper-extremity (UE) task-specific training protocol for people with stroke in the inpatient rehabilitation setting. METHOD. Fifteen patients with UE paresis participated in this study. Task-specific UE training was scheduled for 60 min/day, 4 days/wk, during occupational therapy for the duration of a participant's inpatient stay. During each session, participants were challenged to complete ≥300 repetitions of various tasks. RESULTS. Participants averaged 289 repetitions/session, spending 47 of 60 min in active training. Participants improved on impairment and activity level outcome measures. CONCLUSION. People with stroke in an inpatient setting can achieve hundreds of repetitions of task-specific training in 1-hr sessions. As expected, all participants improved on functional outcome measures. Future studies are needed to determine whether this high-repetition training program results in better outcomes than current UE interventions.
    The American journal of occupational therapy.: official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association 07/2014; 68(4):444-53.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE. To describe parents' concerns and hopes for their children who would be receiving occupational therapy using a sensory integration approach. METHOD. Content analysis of 275 parental responses to three open-ended questions on developmental-sensory history intake forms. FINDINGS. Parents' descriptions of why they sought for their children were categorized into four overarching concerns about their children's challenges: self-regulation, interacting with peers, participating in skilled motor activities, and self-confidence. Parents often linked these concerns together, revealing explanatory models of how they make sense of potential relationships among their children's challenges and how these challenges affect occupational performance. Parents hoped occupational therapy would help their children develop self-understanding and frustration tolerance to self-regulate their behavior in socially acceptable ways. IMPLICATIONS. Assessment and intervention should explicitly focus on links among self-regulation, social participation, skills, and perceived competence to address parents' expectations.
    The American journal of occupational therapy.: official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association 07/2014; 68(4):454-62.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE. To analyze the content of publications in 5 occupational therapy journals to determine the strengths and weaknesses of the literature base from 2006 to 2010. METHOD. A content analysis for 2006 through 2010 of the American Journal of Occupational Therapy (AJOT), Australian Occupational Therapy Journal (AOTJ), British Journal of Occupational Therapy (BJOT), Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy (CJOT), and Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy (SJOT) was completed. RESULTS. AJOT and SJOT had the highest percentage of articles focusing on physical disabilities, whereas a majority of articles in AOTJ, BJOT, and CJOT focused on education. SJOT published articles with the highest median number of participants in all research designs excluding descriptive studies. The majority of the research articles were descriptive for all journals. CONCLUSION. From 2006 to 2010, AJOT provided stronger evidence conducted at higher levels than the other journals by publishing more articles investigating interventions used to support clinical practice.
    The American journal of occupational therapy.: official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association 07/2014; 68(4):e115-23.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE. We sought to understand the lived experience of 2 student veterans and identify factors influencing their higher education. METHOD. A qualitative research design was used with 2 student veterans who engaged in photovoice methodology. We analyzed their photographs, accompanying narratives, and discussion session transcripts using descriptive coding and thematic analysis. RESULTS. Data analysis revealed four themes: (1) reminiscence of past duty and reflections on military life, (2) transition from military life to civilian student life, (3) entry to a new stage of life, and (4) influence of the university and community environment. CONCLUSION. Findings from this study revealed factors influencing student veterans' education and can be used to develop occupation-based interventions to assist veterans who engage in higher education.
    The American journal of occupational therapy.: official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association 07/2014; 68(4):430-8.

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