The American journal of occupational therapy.: official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AM J OCCUP THER)

Publisher: American Occupational Therapy Association, American Occupational Therapy Association

Journal description

AJOT is an official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc. AJOT is a peer-reviewed journal that focuses on research, practice, and health care issues in the field of occupational therapy. The journal publishes articles that are theoretical and conceptual and that represent theory-based research, research reviews, and applied research related to innovative program approaches, educational activities, and professional trends.

Current impact factor: 1.70

Impact Factor Rankings

2015 Impact Factor Available summer 2015
2009 Impact Factor 1.419

Additional details

5-year impact 2.01
Cited half-life 0.00
Immediacy index 1.57
Eigenfactor 0.00
Article influence 0.35
Website American Journal of Occupational Therapy website
Other titles The American journal of occupational therapy, AJOT
ISSN 0272-9490
OCLC 1480164
Material type Periodical, Internet resource
Document type Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

American Occupational Therapy Association

  • Pre-print
    • Archiving status unclear
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • Permission to reuse articles must be sought from the publisher
  • Classification
    ​ white

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To establish hand strength development trends in children with autism and to investigate correlations between grip and pinch strength, components of handwriting, and functional activities in children with and without autism. Fifty-one children were divided into two groups: typically developing children and children on the autism spectrum. Each child completed testing for pinch and grip strength, handwriting legibility, pencil control, and independence in functional activities. The children with autism followed the same strength development trends as the typically developing children. Grip strength correlated with pencil control in both groups and with handwriting legibility in the typically developing children but not in the children with autism. Grip and pinch strength correlated with independence with functional activities in both groups. This study provides evidence that grip and pinch strength are important components in developing pencil control, handwriting legibility, and independence with functional fine motor tasks. Copyright © 2015 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.
    The American journal of occupational therapy.: official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association 07/2015; 69(4):6904220030p1. DOI:10.5014/ajot.2015.016022
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    ABSTRACT: To explore the relationship between sensory processing patterns and sleep problems in typically developing infants and toddlers. A retrospective chart review of 177 infants and toddlers from a community occupational therapy sleep clinic included descriptive and correlational analyses of data from the Infant/Toddler Sensory Profile and Brief Infant Sleep Questionnaire. More than half of participants (55%) demonstrated a pattern of increased sensory processing in one or more quadrants, with sensitivity being most common (36%). We found small but significant correlations between increased seeking and shorter daytime sleep duration (r = -.24, p = .002) and between increased sensitivity and longer time to settle to sleep (r = .27, p < .001). This study adds to recent literature linking sensory processing patterns to sleep problems and is the first to demonstrate this relationship in young, typically developing children. Results support the role of occupational therapy in addressing sleep difficulties in children. Copyright © 2015 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.
    The American journal of occupational therapy.: official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association 07/2015; 69(4):6904220040p1. DOI:10.5014/ajot.2015.015891
  • The American journal of occupational therapy.: official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association 06/2015; 69(4). DOI:10.5014/ajot.2015.014894
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    ABSTRACT: The Record of Driving Errors (RODE) is a novel standardized tool designed to quantitatively document the specific types of driving errors that occur during a standardized performance-based road test. The purpose of this study was to determine interrater reliability between two occupational therapy driver rehabilitation specialists who quantitatively scored specific driving errors using the RODE in a sample of older adults diagnosed with dementia (n = 24). Intraclass correlation coefficients of major driving error and intervention categories indicated almost perfect agreement between raters. Using raters with adequate training and similar professional backgrounds, it is possible to have good interrater reliability using the RODE on a standardized road test. Copyright © 2015 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.
    The American journal of occupational therapy.: official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association 03/2015; 69(2):6902350020p1. DOI:10.5014/ajot.2015.013128
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    ABSTRACT: This article describes how adolescents with sickle cell disease (SCD) perceive their ability to perform everyday tasks required for transition to adult health care and independent living. The Adolescent Autonomy Checklist (AAC) was adapted to include skills associated with managing SCD (AAC-SCD) and was administered to adolescents during clinic visits. Participants indicated "can do already" or "needs practice" for 100 activities in 12 categories. Of 122 patients, the percentage of adolescents who needed practice was greatest in living arrangements (38.7%), money management (35.8%), vocational skills (29.6%), and health care skills (25.5%). We found a significant effect of age and of cerebrovascular injury on the percentage of those who reported "needs practice" in multiple categories. We found no effect of gender and limited effect of hemoglobin phenotype on any skill category. Findings support the need for educational intervention to improve transition skills in adolescents with SCD. Copyright © 2015 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.
    The American journal of occupational therapy.: official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association 03/2015; 69(2):6902350030p1. DOI:10.5014/ajot.2015.013730
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    ABSTRACT: We examined the test-retest reliability of the Child Occupational Self-Assessment (COSA). Fifty-two children ages 6-12 yr completed the COSA on two separate occasions 7-14 days apart. Participant data were analyzed using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Test-retest reliability was good for total Competence and Value scores (ICC2,1 = .72-.77) and poor to good across category scores (ICC2,1 = .44-.78). These findings suggest that the children's perceptions of their abilities and the value they placed on their everyday activities as reflected in the test items were fairly consistent over a short period of time. Copyright © 2015 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.
    The American journal of occupational therapy.: official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association 03/2015; 69(2):6902350010p1. DOI:10.5014/ajot.2015.014290
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    ABSTRACT: We used a randomized controlled design to investigate whether using stability balls during the school day was associated with higher levels of on-task behavior and academic achievement and fewer discipline referrals. Over 9 mo, students in 2 second-grade classrooms in a southeastern rural elementary school used stability balls as chairs while students in 2 control classrooms used chairs as usual. We collected measures of on-task behavior, standardized measures of literacy and mathematics achievement, and discipline referrals. We found similar levels of on-task behavior and achievement in treatment and control classrooms and a downward trend in disruptive behaviors in treatment classrooms. This study did not find use of stability balls for entire general education classrooms to be a practical use of resources for schools. More research with rigorous controlled designs is needed to support the use of stability balls for the general education population. Copyright © 2015 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.
    The American journal of occupational therapy.: official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association 03/2015; 69(2):6902220020p1. DOI:10.5014/ajot.2015.014829
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to develop and validate a clinical reasoning tool to describe an occupational therapist's clinical reasoning process while delivering home modification interventions. We used a two-phase, mixed-methods approach. In Phase 1, we developed a personal factors guideline to support clinical reasoning in home modification interventions based on in-depth interviews, a focus group, and field observations of 6 home modification experts. In Phase 2, the guideline was validated by a second group of 6 home modification experts. During analysis, 16 personal and environmental factors with a corresponding set of conditions and strategies for each factor emerged to form a clinical reasoning guideline, which was validated by a second group of experts. Unpacking the "black box" of the clinical reasoning process has yielded a useful clinical reasoning tool that will allow occupational therapists to deliver complex interventions with fidelity. Copyright © 2015 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.
    The American journal of occupational therapy.: official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association 03/2015; 69(2):6902290030p1. DOI:10.5014/ajot.2015.014266
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    ABSTRACT: We present a novel, knowledge-driven approach to prescription of pointing devices that uses the Ontology-Supported Computerized Assistive Technology Recommender (OSCAR), a clinical decision support system (CDSS). Fifty-five occupational therapists were divided into four groups: two assistive technology (AT) expert groups and two novice groups. Novice Group 1 used the OSCAR CDSS for the prescription process, and Novice Group 2 used the conventional method. OSCAR's effectiveness and its impact on users were evaluated. The ability of Novice Group 1 to make suitable pointing device prescriptions was similar to that of the two expert groups and was significantly better than that of Novice Group 2. The system positively affected Novice Group 1's learning of the prescription process. The structure and organized framework for clinical reasoning of the OSCAR CDSS appear to enable occupational therapy practitioners inexperienced in AT to achieve performance levels comparable to those of experts. Copyright © 2015 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.
    The American journal of occupational therapy.: official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association 03/2015; 69(2):6902280010p1. DOI:10.5014/ajot.2015.014811
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    ABSTRACT: Little is known about how visuospatial deficits affect the use of electronic devices operated by pressing spatially interspersed buttons. This study aimed to determine whether people with Bálint syndrome can effectively use such devices. We quantified the ability of 7 study participants with Bálint syndrome to use button-operated electronic devices by measuring the time required to input digit sequences into three different types of devices. Control groups were 8 participants with amnesia and 8 healthy participants. Participants with Bálint syndrome took longer to input a digit sequence on all three devices than did those in the two control groups. Although we found no significant differences with respect to type of device, 2 of 3 participants with severe Bálint syndrome were able to input one- to five-digit sequences with the electronic calculator. Distinctive design features might positively affect the performance of people with Bálint syndrome. Copyright © 2015 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.
    The American journal of occupational therapy.: official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association 03/2015; 69(2):6902290050p1. DOI:10.5014/ajot.2015.014522
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    ABSTRACT: Reduced physical fitness secondary to heart failure (HF) may contribute to poor driving; reduced physical fitness is a known correlate of cognitive impairment and has been associated with decreased independence in driving. No study has examined the associations among physical fitness, cognition, and driving performance in people with HF. Eighteen people with HF completed a physical fitness assessment, a cognitive test battery, and a validated driving simulator scenario. Partial correlations showed that poorer physical fitness was correlated with more collisions and stop signs missed and lower scores on a composite score of attention, executive function, and psychomotor speed. Cognitive dysfunction predicted reduced driving simulation performance. Reduced physical fitness in participants with HF was associated with worse simulated driving, possibly because of cognitive dysfunction. Larger studies using on-road testing are needed to confirm our findings and identify clinical interventions to maximize safe driving. Copyright © 2015 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.
    The American journal of occupational therapy.: official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association 03/2015; 69(2):6902260010p1. DOI:10.5014/ajot.2015.013573
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    ABSTRACT: Programs and concepts included in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 are expected to transform health care in the United States from a volume-based health system to a value-based health system with increased emphasis on prevention and health promotion. The Triple Aim, a framework set forth by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, focuses on improving the health care experience, the health of populations, and the affordability of care. This article describes telehealth as an integral component in achieving the Triple Aim of health care and discusses implications for occupational therapy practitioners. Copyright © 2015 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.
    The American journal of occupational therapy.: official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association 03/2015; 69(2):6902090010p1. DOI:10.5014/ajot.2015.692003
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    ABSTRACT: Data on the utilization of occupational therapy among patients with brain tumors have been limited to those with malignant tumors and small samples of patients outside North America in specialized palliative care settings. We built on this research by examining the characteristics of patients with brain tumors who received postacute occupational therapy services in Ontario, Canada, using health care administrative data. Between fiscal years 2004-2005 and 2008-2009, 3,199 patients with brain tumors received occupational therapy services in the home care setting after hospital discharge; 12.4% had benign brain tumors, 78.2% had malignant brain tumors, and 9.4% had unspecified brain tumors. However, patients with benign brain tumors were older (mean age = 63.3 yr), and a higher percentage were female (65.2%). More than 90% of patients received in-home occupational therapy services. Additional research is needed to examine the significance of these differences and to identify factors that influence access to occupational therapy services in the home care setting. Copyright © 2015 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.
    The American journal of occupational therapy.: official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association 03/2015; 69(2):6902290010p1. DOI:10.5014/ajot.2015.014639