The American journal of occupational therapy.: official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AM J OCCUP THER )

Publisher: American Occupational Therapy Association

Description

AJOT is an official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc. AJOT is a peer-reviewed journal that focuses on research, practice, and health care issues in the field of occupational therapy. The journal publishes articles that are theoretical and conceptual and that represent theory-based research, research reviews, and applied research related to innovative program approaches, educational activities, and professional trends.

Impact factor 1.70

  • 5-year impact
    2.01
  • Cited half-life
    0.00
  • Immediacy index
    1.57
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.35
  • Website
    American Journal of Occupational Therapy website
  • Other titles
    The American journal of occupational therapy, AJOT
  • ISSN
    0272-9490
  • OCLC
    1480164
  • Material type
    Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This evidence-based review was conducted to determine which interventions are effective in improving occupational performance after stroke. Forty-six articles met the inclusion criteria and were examined. Interventions for the following impairments were reviewed: general cognitive deficits, executive dysfunction, apraxia, memory loss, attention deficits, visual field deficits (included because of their close relationship with neglect), and unilateral neglect. Evidence is available from a variety of clinical trials to guide interventions regarding general cognition, apraxia, and neglect. The evidence regarding interventions for executive dysfunction and memory loss is limited. There is insufficient evidence regarding impairments of attention and mixed evidence regarding interventions for visual field deficits. The effective interventions have some commonalities, including being performance focused, involving strategy training, and using a compensatory as opposed to a remediation approach. The implications of the findings for practice, research, and education are discussed. Copyright © 2015 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.
    The American journal of occupational therapy.: official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association 01/2015; 69(1):6901180040p1-6901180040p9.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Client satisfaction, a widely used outcome indicator of quality in health care, is inherently client centered and important in occupational therapy. We developed an instrument called the Satisfaction With Continuum of Care Revised (SCC-R) and tested a logistic regression model of satisfaction for six predictive research questions. Data collected from 769 clients from a large rehabilitation hospital using the SCC-R were paired with data that included demographics, functional status, and measures of the rehabilitation including occupational therapy. Satisfaction was stratified into two groups, satisfied and dissatisfied. The most robust and consistent predictors of satisfaction were functional status and improvements in functional status, presence of a neurological disorder, total rehabilitation hours, and admission to rehabilitation within 15 days of condition onset. The finding that improvements in functional status, especially self-care, were predictive of satisfaction is particularly relevant for occupational therapy. Implications for practice and future research are discussed. Copyright © 2015 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.
    The American journal of occupational therapy.: official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association 01/2015; 69(1):6901290040p1-6901290040p10.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE. To determine the feasibility and impact of home-based, mental practice-triggered electrical stimulation among stroke survivors exhibiting moderate upper-extremity (UE) impairment. METHOD. Five participants with moderate, stable UE hemiparesis were administered the Fugl-Meyer Assessment, the Box and Block Test, and the Activities of Daily Living, Hand Function, and overall recovery domains of the Stroke Impact Scale (Version 3). They were then administered an 8-wk regimen consisting of 1 hr of mental practice-triggered electrical stimulation every weekday in their home. At the end of every 2 wk, participants attended supervised stimulation to progress therapeutic exercises and stimulation levels and monitor compliance. RESULTS. Six instances of device noncompliance were reported. Participants exhibited reduced UE motor impairment and increased UE dexterity and participation in valued activities. CONCLUSION. The regimen appears feasible and had a substantial impact on UE impairment, dexterity, and participation in valued activities as well as perceptions of recovery. Copyright © 2015 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.
    The American journal of occupational therapy.: official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association 01/2015; 69(1):6901290050p1-6901290050p8.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study aimed to determine whether a difference in productivity exists between clinicians supervising and not supervising a Level II occupational therapy student and whether factors including clinician years of experience, practice setting, and clinician productivity without a student could predict clinician productivity while supervising a student. We used paired-sample t tests to examine clinician productivity with and without a student in 109 clinician-student encounters and regression analysis to determine factors predictive of clinician productivity with a student. Results indicated no difference in clinician productivity with or without a student. Clinician years of experience, practice area, and productivity without a student were significant predictors of clinician productivity while supervising a student. Study results contradict the belief that supervising Level II fieldwork students lowers clinicians' productivity. Findings suggest that practice area and productivity without a student are important factors influencing the productivity of clinicians supervising a fieldwork student. Copyright © 2015 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.
    The American journal of occupational therapy.: official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association 01/2015; 69(1):6901260010p1-6901260010p7.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Pressure ulcers (PrUs) are a major burden to patients with spinal cord injury (SCI), affecting their psychological, physical, and social well-being. Lifestyle choices are thought to contribute to the risk of developing PrUs. This article focuses on the interaction between lifestyle choices and the development of PrUs in community settings among participants in the University of Southern California-Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center Pressure Ulcer Prevention Study (PUPS II), a randomized controlled trial of a lifestyle intervention for adults with SCI. We conducted a secondary cross-case analysis of treatment notes of 47 PUPS II participants and identified four patterns relating PrU development to lifestyle changes: positive PrU changes (e.g., healing PrUs) with positive lifestyle changes, negative or no PrU changes with positive lifestyle changes, positive PrU changes with minor lifestyle changes, and negative or no PrU changes with no lifestyle changes. We present case studies exemplifying each pattern. Copyright © 2015 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.
    The American journal of occupational therapy.: official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association 01/2015; 69(1):6901290020p1-6901290020p10.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE. We sought to explore differences in range of motion (ROM), grip strength, and self-reported pain and disability over time after plate-fixation surgery for distal radius fracture. METHOD. We used a prospective repeated-measures research design with four measure points for a study sample of 101 patients. The Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) Questionnaire; the Global Assessment Scale; and the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure were used to assess ROM, grip strength, and pain level. RESULTS. ROM and grip strength improved over time. Pain improved until 6 mo after surgery but greatly deteriorated from 6 to 24 mo. Concurrently, overall discomfort (global index) from the wrist extensively improved from 12 to 24 mo. DASH score decreased 20.1 points from 6 wk to 6 mo and remained stable until 24 mo. CONCLUSION. Even when ROM and grip strength were almost fully regained at 12 mo, pain at rest and during activity was still an issue at 24 mo. Copyright © 2015 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.
    The American journal of occupational therapy.: official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association 01/2015; 69(1):6901290030p1-6901290030p7.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This systematic review of multidisciplinary literature synthesizes evidence of the prevalence and patterns of sensory processing disorder (SPD) in children ages birth-3 yr born preterm. Forty-five articles including physiological, behavioral, temperament, and SPD research met the inclusion criteria and provided 295 findings related to SPD-130 (44%) positive (evidence of SPD) and 165 (56%) negative (no evidence of SPD). The majority of findings related to sensory modulation disorder (SMD; 43% positive). The most prevalent subcategory of SMD was sensory overresponsivity (82% of findings positive). Evidence of sensory underresponsivity and sensory-seeking SMD, sensory discrimination disorder, and sensory-based motor disorder was limited. This study supports the education of neonatologists, pediatricians, and caregivers about the symptoms and potential consequences of SPD and helps justify the need for follow-up screening for SPD in children ages birth-3 yr born preterm. Research using measures based on sensory processing theory is needed. Copyright © 2015 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.
    The American journal of occupational therapy.: official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association 01/2015; 69(1):6901220030p1-6901220030p11.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Evidence-based reviews of the literature relevant to adults with stroke are important to the practice of occupational therapy. We describe the four questions that served as the focus for the evidence-based reviews of the effectiveness of occupational therapy interventions for adults with stroke. The questions include occupation- and activity-based interventions to improve occupational performance and social participation after stroke, as well as interventions for motor, cognitive, and psychological and emotional impairments after stroke. We include the background for the reviews; the process followed for addressing each question, including search terms and search strategy; the databases searched; and the methods used to summarize and critically appraise the literature. The final number of articles included in each evidence-based review; a summary of the themes of the results; the strengths and limitations of the findings; and implications for practice, education, and research are presented. Copyright © 2015 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.
    The American journal of occupational therapy.: official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association 01/2015; 69(1):6901180020p1-6901180020p5.
  • The American journal of occupational therapy.: official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association 01/2015; 69(1):6901070010p1-6901070010p3.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This evidence-based review was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of occupational therapy interventions to prevent or mitigate the effects of psychological or emotional impairments after stroke. Thirty-nine journal articles met the inclusion criteria. Six types of interventions were identified that addressed depression, anxiety, or mental health-related quality of life: exercise or movement based, behavioral therapy and stroke education, behavioral therapy only, stroke education only, care support and coordination, and community-based interventions that included occupational therapy. Evidence from well-conducted research supports using problem-solving or motivational interviewing behavioral techniques to address depression. The evidence is inconclusive for using multicomponent exercise programs to combat depression after stroke and for the use of stroke education and care support and coordination interventions to address poststroke anxiety. One study provided support for an intensive multidisciplinary home program in improving depression, anxiety, and health-related quality of life. The implications of the findings for practice, research, and education are discussed. Copyright © 2015 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.
    The American journal of occupational therapy.: official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association 01/2015; 69(1):6901180050p1-6901180050p9.
  • The American journal of occupational therapy.: official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association 01/2015; 69(1):6901090010p1-6901090010p7.
  • The American journal of occupational therapy.: official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association 01/2015; 69(1):6901080010p1-6901080010p4.
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE. We examined the efficacy of a crisis-based intervention in improving mother-child interaction and children's play functioning for families who had experienced domestic violence. METHOD. Using a pretest-posttest two-group control study design, we assigned the intervention group (n = 20 mother-child dyads) to the Family Intervention for Improving Occupational Performance (FI-OP) program and the control group (n = 17 dyads) to a playroom program. Both programs consisted of eight 30-min sessions. We videotaped dyads during free play and used standardized tools to assess interactions, play skills, and playfulness. RESULTS. After the intervention, mother-child interaction was significantly better in the FI-OP group than in the playroom group. The children in the FI-OP group also demonstrated significantly greater improvement in play skills, but not in playfulness. CONCLUSION. FI-OP is a promising program for improving aspects of mother-child interaction and children's play functioning among survivors of domestic violence. Copyright © 2015 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.
    The American journal of occupational therapy.: official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association 01/2015; 69(1):6901220020p1-6901220020p11.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We conducted a review to determine the effectiveness of interventions to improve occupational performance in people with motor impairments after stroke as part of the American Occupational Therapy Association's Evidence-Based Practice Project. One hundred forty-nine studies met inclusion criteria. Findings related to key outcomes from select interventions are presented. Results suggest that a variety of effective interventions are available to improve occupational performance after stroke. Evidence suggests that repetitive task practice, constraint-induced or modified constraint-induced movement therapy, strengthening and exercise, mental practice, virtual reality, mirror therapy, and action observation can improve upper-extremity function, balance and mobility, and/or activity and participation. Commonalities among several of the effective interventions include the use of goal-directed, individualized tasks that promote frequent repetitions of task-related or task-specific movements. Copyright © 2015 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.
    The American journal of occupational therapy.: official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association 01/2015; 69(1):6901180030p1-6901180030p9.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This evidence-based review examined the evidence supporting the use of occupation-based interventions to improve areas of occupation and social participation poststroke. A total of 39 studies met the inclusion criteria and were critically evaluated. Most of the literature targeted activity of daily living (ADL)-based interventions and collectively provided strong evidence for the use of occupation-based interventions to improve ADL performance. The evidence related to instrumental ADLs was much more disparate, with limited evidence to support the use of virtual reality interventions and emerging evidence to support driver education programs to improve occupational performance poststroke. Only 6 studies addressed leisure, social participation, or rest and sleep, with sufficient evidence to support only leisure-based interventions. The implications of this review for research, education, and practice in occupational therapy are also discussed. Copyright © 2015 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.
    The American journal of occupational therapy.: official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association 01/2015; 69(1):6901180060p1-6901180060p11.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Age at first stroke is decreasing, and most strokes are mild to moderate in severity. Executive function (EF) deficits are increasingly recognized in the stroke population, but occupational therapists have not altered their evaluation methods to fully accommodate changing patient needs. We present a hierarchical performance-based testing (PBT) pathway using data to illustrate how PBT could identify patients with mild stroke-related EF deficits in need of occupational therapy intervention. Data suggest that a substantial number of patients with EF deficits after mild stroke could benefit from occupational therapy services. Copyright © 2015 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.
    The American journal of occupational therapy.: official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association 01/2015; 69(1):6901360010p1-6901360010p5.
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE. We sought to determine whether intensive low vision rehabilitation would confer any functional improvement in a sample of blind adults using the BrainPort artificial vision device. METHOD. Eighteen adults ages 28-69 yr (n = 10 men and n = 8 women) who had light perception only or worse vision bilaterally spent up to 6 hr per day for 1 wk undergoing structured rehabilitation interventions. The functional outcomes of object identification and word recognition were tested at baseline and after rehabilitation training. RESULTS. At baseline, participants were unable to complete the two functional assessments. After participation in the 1-wk training protocol, participants were able to use the BrainPort device to complete the two tasks with moderate success. CONCLUSION. Without training, participants were not able to perform above chance level using the BrainPort device. As artificial vision technologies become available, occupational therapy practitioners can play a key role in clients' success or failure in using these devices. Copyright © 2015 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.
    The American journal of occupational therapy.: official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association 01/2015; 69(1):6901290010p1-6901290010p8.
  • The American journal of occupational therapy.: official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association 01/2015; 69(1):6901170010p1-6901170010p3.