Journal of Education for Teaching (J Educ Teach )

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Description

The Journal of Education for Teaching is an established international periodical which publishes original contributions on the subject of teacher education. It interprets 'teacher education' in the widest sense, to include initial training, in-service education and staff development. The journal welcomes scholarly discussions of new issues, reports of research projects or surveys of research work in particular fields, and contributions to current debates in teacher education throughout the world, generally or on specific issues.

  • Impact factor
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  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
    0.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.00
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.00
  • Website
    Journal of Education for Teaching website
  • Other titles
    JET. Journal of education for teaching, J.E.T., JET
  • ISSN
    0260-7476
  • OCLC
    7154185
  • Material type
    Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 12 month embargo for STM, Behavioural Science and Public Health Journals
    • 18 month embargo for SSH journals
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • Pre-print on authors own website, Institutional or Subject Repository
    • Post-print on authors own website, Institutional or Subject Repository
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • Publisher will deposit to PMC on behalf of NIH authors.
    • STM: Science, Technology and Medicine
    • SSH: Social Science and Humanities
    • 'Taylor & Francis (Psychology Press)' is an imprint of 'Taylor & Francis'
  • Classification
    ​ yellow

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article explores linguistic and cultural border crossing and the long-term consequences of transnational mobility on a professional international academic. It provides an in-depth qualitative analysis of a research interview which investigated the internationalisation background of a Danish academic within an English-speaking context. This individual’s personal history includes experiences abroad that have paved the way for a range of reflections and stance-takings that reflect larger scale political and ideological currents. The interviewee relates his biographical details in a way that shows a distancing from unreflected attachment to both the Danish and the USA contexts in which he has lived in the past. The interview also shows how personal circumstances and life histories can provide sources over time for ‘global reflexivity’.
    Journal of Education for Teaching 05/2014; 40(3).
  • Journal of Education for Teaching 05/2014; 40(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: An invitation to be a visiting academic at a Malaysian university provided me with rich opportunities to talk with international students and academics and to explore their experiences of learning and teaching in that context. The university had developed an internationalisation strategy and was positioning itself as an ‘education hub’ for South-East Asia. Having conducted extensive similar research in the UK, a context in which I am perceived to be an insider, investigating people’s experiences in a context in which I felt myself to be an outsider enabled me to reflect on their narratives and to compare and contrast them with my own experiences of the Malaysian university. I conducted narrative interviews with six doctoral researchers and three academics, curious to hear their stories about what had brought them to Malaysia, their reasons for studying or working there, how they experienced the learning and teaching environment, their relationships with local Malaysian students and academics. I was intrigued by what they told me, finding some surprising commonalities with other research that I had conducted and also some significant differences. In this article, I share the findings, reflecting also on my own experiences in Malaysia.
    Journal of Education for Teaching 05/2014; 40(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article builds on the key findings of the UK Higher Education Academy study Transnational Education Learning and Teaching to explore the way in which Wenger’s characteristics of communities of practice could help provide a theoretical framework for improving communication and creating more effective transnational education (TNE) partnerships. It argues that working towards the development of communities of practice, promoting a focus on the quality of the relationship between partners for the enhancement of practice, could be used to raise the quality of learning experiences for students. A focus on the process of developing collaborative partnerships rather than concentrating merely on the TNE product is promoted through this discussion. It thus argues that TNE processes could be improved through joint enterprise in order to develop the TNE product together; mutual engagement to promote shared responsibility for developing the community; and shared repertoire, which highlights the importance of working collaboratively to seek contextually appropriate solutions.
    Journal of Education for Teaching 05/2014; 40(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article analyses the current situation of transnational higher education (TNE) in China by conducting a comprehensive documentary analysis. It first situates the phenomenon in global transnational mobility in higher education and then explores the diverse motivations of importing and exporting countries taking China and the UK as linked examples. The documentary analysis carried out for this research suggests that China has stated aims to promote TNE as a public good, whereas UK motivations for transnational education are ostensibly more driven by financial reasons. The article also identifies three features of the current situation in China: first showing that the distribution of the TNE in China is imbalanced; second, partner institutions are based in 21 economically developed countries or regions; third, the prominent cooperative arrangements are strongly focused in particular disciplines. The article argues that these features have led to unfair competition in some areas. Therefore, it appears that there are some inconsistencies and tensions between the stated aims of Chinese TNE policy and the way in which TNE is spreading and developing in practice.
    Journal of Education for Teaching 05/2014; 40(3).
  • Journal of Education for Teaching 05/2014; 40(3).
  • Journal of Education for Teaching 05/2014; 40(3).
  • Journal of Education for Teaching 05/2014; 40(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The expansion of transnational higher education programmes over the last decade has foregrounded the themes of internationalisation, cross-cultural learning and cooperation in international research, whilst also raising questions about the appropriateness of educational programmes originally tailored for very different contexts, about the nature of the teaching and learning experience and regarding the assurance of standards and quality across geographically, culturally and educationally remote contexts. This theoretical article addresses some of the most salient issues raised in recent transnational education scholarship, with a particular focus on cultural imperialism and the dynamics between the global and local, the ‘powerful’ and the ‘powerless’. Building on the socio-linguistic work of Fairclough, and linking this to Bourdieu’s social theory, the article suggests a way of conceptually re-examining the various power relationships between actors in the transnational higher education field, suggesting a way of reconciling the apparent oppositions and polarities and enabling a more dynamic analysis of the field.
    Journal of Education for Teaching 05/2014; 40(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Significant changes have occurred in the international education landscape driven by the need for access to higher education in developing countries. One response to this situation has been the provision of higher education in the developing country via partnership arrangements with overseas institutions. Rapid growth in transnational programmes has resulted in many opportunities for nations seeking to build their capacity, for institutions and for staff and student learning, as well as significant challenges. This research contributes to addressing some of these challenges by focusing attention on teaching and learning practice development with transnational teaching teams. This paper is grounded empirically in an international collaboration between three Australian, one Malaysian and one Vietnamese university. Employing a practice-based approach using multi-site participatory action research, the researchers investigated the professional development needs of transnational teaching teams and their experience working in transnational programmes. The study suggests that for professional development to be effective in transnational education it needs to be collaboratively designed and negotiated, context-sensitive and specific, practice-based and involve teams engaging and learning together in their daily work contexts. Such an approach harnesses the diversity of transnational teaching teams and enhances dialogue and relationships amongst team members.
    Journal of Education for Teaching 04/2014; 40(3):232-250.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In this article, contemporary issues in early childhood teacher education in Sweden are situated. The aim of the study was to explore dimensions of the construct of preschool teachers competence as reported by 810 students enrolled in early childhood teacher education at 15 Swedish universities. The results showed that student’s definitions of preschool teacher competence were composed of six different dimensions; a general pedagogical competence, specific content competence, distinct teacher competence, play competence, competence of child perspective, collaborative and social competence. In general there were quite large variations in how students perceived the concept of preschool teacher competence and the extent to which they believed they developed these competences during the course of their education. The different dimensions of preschool teacher competence are discussed in relation to the content of the early childhood teacher education in Sweden, the curriculum for the preschool and the concept of professionalism in ECEC.
    Journal of Education for Teaching 02/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Difficulties in attracting student teachers have resulted in research focusing on student teachers’ motives for studying to join the profession. Because previous findings are mixed, the first aim of this study was to explore motives for students to become teachers. A second aim was to explore the relationship between teachers’ motives and their academic engagement and dropout rates at the end of their studies. A sample of 333 student teachers at a Swedish university completed a questionnaire measuring motives for becoming a teacher and their academic engagement. The best model of a confirmatory factor analyses defined three motivational factors as altruistic, intrinsic and extrinsic motives. A path analysis showed a negative significant relationship between the altruistic motive and dropout, mediated by academic engagement, whereas the relationships between intrinsic and extrinsic motives and academic engagement were not significant.
    Journal of Education for Teaching 01/2014; 40(2):173-185.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Pre-service teachers’ beliefs about classroom motivation, and how these beliefs may be developed during initial teacher preparation, is a relatively new aspect of enquiry in the fields of motivation and teacher education. An empirical study, grounded in a social constructivist perspective, was designed to examine the impact of providing pre-service teachers with opportunities to develop their existing beliefs about classroom motivation in interaction with peers. Participants were 53 teacher education students who participated in three semi-structured small group seminars, involving guided reflection and collaborative activities. Data were collected through matched pre- and post-questionnaires, and a final individual interview. The findings show that pre-service teachers’ initial beliefs about classroom motivation can be consolidated and expanded through engagement in semi-structured collaborative learning activities that induce in-depth reflection and examination of beliefs, and in authentic problem-solving situations that connect with theory. Implications for further research and teacher education are discussed.
    Journal of Education for Teaching 01/2014; 40(2):155-172.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper explores the potential of video capture to generate a collaborative space for teacher preparation; a space in which traditional hierarchies and boundaries between actors (student teacher, school mentor and university tutor) and knowledge (academic, professional and practical) are disrupted. The study, based in a teacher education department in an English university, is contextualised in the policy context of school–university partnerships. Video capture is used as a vehicle to promote dialogue and collaborative practice between partners during school-based elements of a teacher preparation course. Analysis highlights the power of this space to promote reciprocal learning across the partnership.
    Journal of Education for Teaching 01/2014; 40(2).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper outlines new educational policy initiatives that have been recently introduced to Australian schooling contexts and describes the challenges of providing rich and empowering professional development opportunities for classroom teachers and educational leaders in an era of heightened accountability and change. A framework for large-scale professional learning is proposed; one that adopts a theoretical lens associated with practice architectures, situated within community- and individual-focused professional learning experiences. The theoretical component of the model has been utilised effectively in a number of countries, while the personalised learning component is drawn from an evidence-based project that established a national learning framework.
    Journal of Education for Teaching 01/2014; 40(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Since teachers’ decisions potentially have consequences for learners’ future educational and life opportunities, it is imperative to determine the basis of teachers’ decision-making in order to determine whether it is discriminatory. This study combines qualitative and quantitative methods towards a multi-school, multi-region study of Australian teachers in order to consider if student placement decisions made about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander learners are influenced by factors beyond academic ability.
    Journal of Education for Teaching 01/2014; 40(1):94-96.
  • Journal of Education for Teaching 01/2014; 40(2).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Although research reveals that pre-service student teachers often regard their relationships with their significant others as an important element of their initial teaching practice experience, much remains unknown about the influence of significant others on non-native English as a Second Language (ESL) student teachers’ professional learning process during field experiences. This paper presents the findings of a qualitative study of the professional learning experiences of 17 pre-service non-native ESL student teachers during an eight-week-long practicum. Grounded in a sociocultural view of teacher learning, the study explores how the ESL student teachers developed their understanding of professional learning in the light of their experiences of engaging with their supporting teachers, supervisors, other school staff members as well as peer student teachers during the practicum. Analysis of the data reveals that these people assumed the role of coach either directly or indirectly, having a positive influence on the student teachers’ role as a teacher. Analysis of the data also reveals negative interactions between student teachers and their significant others, which sociocultural theories have so far not taken sufficiently into account. While, findings of this study challenge past assumptions about where knowledge for teaching comes from and how it can be learned; this study also suggests an urgent need to consolidate university–school partnership to foster student teachers’ adaptation to the context of teaching practice and maximise their professional learning opportunities.
    Journal of Education for Teaching 01/2014; 40(2).

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