Journal of Education for Teaching (J Educ Teach )

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Description

The Journal of Education for Teaching is an established international periodical which publishes original contributions on the subject of teacher education. It interprets 'teacher education' in the widest sense, to include initial training, in-service education and staff development. The journal welcomes scholarly discussions of new issues, reports of research projects or surveys of research work in particular fields, and contributions to current debates in teacher education throughout the world, generally or on specific issues.

  • Impact factor
    0.00
  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
    0.00
  • Immediacy index
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  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
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  • Website
    Journal of Education for Teaching website
  • Other titles
    JET. Journal of education for teaching, J.E.T., JET
  • ISSN
    0260-7476
  • OCLC
    7154185
  • Material type
    Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author can archive a post-print version
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • On author's personal website or departmental website immediately
    • On institutional repository or subject-based repository after either 12 months embargo for STM, Behavioural Science and Public Health Journals or 18 months embargo for SSH journals
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • The publisher will deposit in on behalf of authors to a designated institutional repository including PubMed Central, where a deposit agreement exists with the repository
    • STM: Science, Technology and Medicine
    • SSH: Social Science and Humanities
    • Publisher last contacted on 25/03/2014
    • 'Taylor & Francis (Psychology Press)' is an imprint of 'Taylor & Francis'
  • Classification
    ​ green

Publications in this journal

  • Journal of Education for Teaching 08/2014; 40(4).
  • Journal of Education for Teaching 08/2014; 40(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Within professional learning communities, the processes of shared reflection and critique, or critical transformative dialogues are considered crucial for the maintenance and improvement of professional practice. This paper focuses on the development of the processes of critical transformative dialogues and their application in the professional development of pre-service teachers. Participants reported a growing understanding of the importance of a continuing critical dialogue, and an appreciation of the value that critical feedback has in developing professional skills. The paper argues for the value of providing spaces for early engagement in the processes of critical transformative dialogue as part of professional preparation. A cumulative model of transformative practice for supporting pre-service teachers’ emerging schema for teaching is proposed.
    Journal of Education for Teaching 08/2014; 40(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In this study, we aimed to clarify future preschool teachers’ attitudes and perceptions about introducing life events, such as chronic illness, hospitalisation, divorce and death to their pupils. We used semi-structured interviews for two different groups who had and had not attended relative to life events courses. Results indicated that future educators, who had not been trained in introducing life events to preschool children, were unable to perceive themselves as preventers. Furthermore, they underlined the importance of the periodic assistance of other professionals, while the group that had attended a relative course suggested that the course be compulsory and offered as a workshop. Neither group questioned the necessity of this kind of education, whereas both groups focused only on two life events, divorce and death.
    Journal of Education for Teaching 08/2014; 40(4).
  • Journal of Education for Teaching 08/2014; 40(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In many countries, there is a growing need for teacher awareness and sensitivity to cultural differences, what is often called culturally responsive teaching. This is why teacher education institutions are making significant efforts to require student teachers to enrol in courses that focus on understanding, tolerance and acceptance of differences in others. Determining beliefs of student teachers towards the diversity of pupils at the onset of their studies is critical for providing teacher education that more efficiently challenges implicit beliefs and biases. The main objective in this paper is therefore to determine the initial beliefs of student teachers concerning the Roma population, Europe’s largest ethnic minority. Research was conducted at the Faculty of Education at the University of Ljubljana in Slovenia and the Teacher Training Faculty at the University of Belgrade in Serbia. The results of the study suggest that most student teachers are in favour of schooling Roma pupils in regular schools; however, most of them would not like to have them in their classes. Most student teachers are aware of the discrimination against Roma pupils in schools; however, they are not ready to engage in closer interactions with Roma families. The implications of these findings for teacher education programmes are subsequently discussed.
    Journal of Education for Teaching 08/2014; 40(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The article explores the concept of wicked problems and proposes a reinvigorated application of this concept for wider educational use. This recommendation stems from the contributions of a number of scholars who frame some of the most contentious and recalcitrant educational issues as wicked problems. The present authors build upon these previous explorations of wickedity and initially apply it to literacy learning. They then discuss the relevance for wicked responses and wicked actions for the wider educational community (e.g. parents, teachers, policy-makers, teacher educators and educational researchers). The authors conclude with three proposals for understanding and addressing wickedity: (a) promoting careful observation and continuous curiosity, (b) increasing conversations with diverse stakeholders and (c) engaging in collective and distributed sense-making.
    Journal of Education for Teaching 08/2014; 40(4).
  • Journal of Education for Teaching 08/2014; 40(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper reports on findings from an exploratory study carried out in Portugal and Sweden, concerning student teacher recruitment to Initial Teacher Education (ITE) programmes. It addresses issues such as the motivations and expectations of the student teachers regarding the teaching profession. Drawing upon existing related literature, a questionnaire was designed and sent to student teachers in Portugal and in Sweden. In total, 112 and 157 student teachers participated in the study, respectively. Data suggest a given profile of a student teacher making it possible to analyse some of key characteristics in both countries. The comparison between countries in combination with suggestions and recommendations from student teachers indicate that the recruitment process may be supported if the information about the design, content and the aims of ITE programmes are clarified and made explicit.
    Journal of Education for Teaching 08/2014; 40(4).
  • Journal of Education for Teaching 08/2014; 40(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article addresses the teacher educator’s role in defining and facilitating teacher well-being. It does so by first exploring the literature on teacher well-being, resilience, resistance, morality and professional dispositions. It then examines the policies and rhetoric of two countries, the USA and England, as examples of a global tilt towards the excessive promotion of institutional well-being at the expense of individual teachers. It concludes with specific recommendations at the university programme and teacher educator levels for bringing individual and institutional well-being into better balance. These include: innovating sustained and reciprocal university–school partnerships; helping new teachers become ‘mindful’ rather than solely resistant; analysing cases of teaching to become more aware of macro vs. micro influences; and facilitating skills in taking oppositional stances, including within the teacher educator’s own classroom.
    Journal of Education for Teaching 08/2014; 40(4).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The expansion of transnational higher education programmes over the last decade has foregrounded the themes of internationalisation, cross-cultural learning and cooperation in international research, whilst also raising questions about the appropriateness of educational programmes originally tailored for very different contexts, about the nature of the teaching and learning experience and regarding the assurance of standards and quality across geographically, culturally and educationally remote contexts. This theoretical article addresses some of the most salient issues raised in recent transnational education scholarship, with a particular focus on cultural imperialism and the dynamics between the global and local, the ‘powerful’ and the ‘powerless’. Building on the socio-linguistic work of Fairclough, and linking this to Bourdieu’s social theory, the article suggests a way of conceptually re-examining the various power relationships between actors in the transnational higher education field, suggesting a way of reconciling the apparent oppositions and polarities and enabling a more dynamic analysis of the field.
    Journal of Education for Teaching 05/2014; 40(3).
  • Journal of Education for Teaching 05/2014; 40(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article explores linguistic and cultural border crossing and the long-term consequences of transnational mobility on a professional international academic. It provides an in-depth qualitative analysis of a research interview which investigated the internationalisation background of a Danish academic within an English-speaking context. This individual’s personal history includes experiences abroad that have paved the way for a range of reflections and stance-takings that reflect larger scale political and ideological currents. The interviewee relates his biographical details in a way that shows a distancing from unreflected attachment to both the Danish and the USA contexts in which he has lived in the past. The interview also shows how personal circumstances and life histories can provide sources over time for ‘global reflexivity’.
    Journal of Education for Teaching 05/2014; 40(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article analyses the current situation of transnational higher education (TNE) in China by conducting a comprehensive documentary analysis. It first situates the phenomenon in global transnational mobility in higher education and then explores the diverse motivations of importing and exporting countries taking China and the UK as linked examples. The documentary analysis carried out for this research suggests that China has stated aims to promote TNE as a public good, whereas UK motivations for transnational education are ostensibly more driven by financial reasons. The article also identifies three features of the current situation in China: first showing that the distribution of the TNE in China is imbalanced; second, partner institutions are based in 21 economically developed countries or regions; third, the prominent cooperative arrangements are strongly focused in particular disciplines. The article argues that these features have led to unfair competition in some areas. Therefore, it appears that there are some inconsistencies and tensions between the stated aims of Chinese TNE policy and the way in which TNE is spreading and developing in practice.
    Journal of Education for Teaching 05/2014; 40(3).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: An invitation to be a visiting academic at a Malaysian university provided me with rich opportunities to talk with international students and academics and to explore their experiences of learning and teaching in that context. The university had developed an internationalisation strategy and was positioning itself as an ‘education hub’ for South-East Asia. Having conducted extensive similar research in the UK, a context in which I am perceived to be an insider, investigating people’s experiences in a context in which I felt myself to be an outsider enabled me to reflect on their narratives and to compare and contrast them with my own experiences of the Malaysian university. I conducted narrative interviews with six doctoral researchers and three academics, curious to hear their stories about what had brought them to Malaysia, their reasons for studying or working there, how they experienced the learning and teaching environment, their relationships with local Malaysian students and academics. I was intrigued by what they told me, finding some surprising commonalities with other research that I had conducted and also some significant differences. In this article, I share the findings, reflecting also on my own experiences in Malaysia.
    Journal of Education for Teaching 05/2014; 40(3).
  • Journal of Education for Teaching 05/2014; 40(3).
  • Journal of Education for Teaching 05/2014; 40(3).