Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics (Phys Occup Ther Pediatr )

Description

The highly acclaimed Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics delivers vital information to all therapists involved in developmental and physical rehabilitation of infants and children. Designed for PT and OT pediatric professionals in hospitals, rehab centers, schools, and health and human service agencies, the journal provides the latest clinical research and practical applications that no helping professional will want to miss. Current clinical advances and research findings are important for all therapists, and each issue of POTP brings therapists the latest discoveries in therapy as related to their work with children. Many aspects of therapy are dealt with in each volume of POTP through its columns. The journal's extensive book review section presents insightful commentary on many types of publications in the field. Helping professionals will find the reviews an excellent resource for the diverse situations they confront in their daily work with disabled children. Highlights of the current stream of thought relating to practice and research standards are featured in "Commentaries," a forum in which therapists voice their concerns or praise over research reports, and in "Clinical Concerns," a column in which therapists address strengths and weaknesses of procedures, tests, and therapeutic appliances used in therapy with children. In the annotated bibliography, therapists inform other therapists on aspects of therapy as presented and reported in journals and books, and in "Abstracts of Theses and Dissertations," yet-to-be-published research and theories of therapy with children are featured. Through these columns, POTP brings many viewpoints on the varied aspects of pediatric therapy to therapists, enabling them to focus sharply on today's professional issues.

  • Impact factor
    1.24
  • 5-year impact
    0.00
  • Cited half-life
    6.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.14
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.00
  • Website
    Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics website
  • Other titles
    Physical & occupational therapy in pediatrics, Physical and occupational therapy in pediatrics
  • ISSN
    0194-2638
  • OCLC
    5365306
  • Material type
    Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Journal / Magazine / Newspaper, Internet Resource

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: ABSTRACT It is well established in the literature that school-based practice is fraught with challenges such as acquisition of appropriate and sufficient resources, communication barriers among professionals, parental burden, and redundancies and gaps in services. The purpose of this perspective paper is to reframe potentially problematic school-based practices using a critical social science perspective, suggesting a vision and strategies for therapists working in the context of school-based practice. We illustrate our approach with a case example. To reframe school-based practices, we begin with Jill's case, exploring it through a critical lens to identify potential issues and opportunities for change. We then trace these findings to our larger dataset from an ongoing program of research to ensure relevance to the broader context of school-based practice. Reframing of three school-based practice issues is discussed from: (a) advocacy by proxy to collaborative dialogue, (b) governing texts to guiding texts, and (c) playing the "right" part to having a voice. Although this is a perspective paper based on a case exemplar, we posit how we may reframe and rethink school-based practices in pediatric rehabilitation. We suggest that only with a genuine shift in our professional values will we see the enactment of collaborative practice in school-based settings.
    Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Aims. In this perspective article, we propose the Apollo model as an example of an innovative interdisciplinary, community-based service delivery model for children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) characterized by the use of graduated levels of intensity and evidence-based interventions that focus on function and participation. Methods. We describe the context that led to the creation of the Apollo model, describe the approach to service delivery and the services offered. Results. The Apollo model has 5 components: first contact, service delivery coordination, community-, group-, and individual-interventions. This model guided the development of a streamlined set of services offered to children with DCD, including early-intake to share educational information with families, community interventions, inter-disciplinary and occupational therapy groups, and individual interventions. Following implementation of the Apollo model, wait-times decreased and the number of children receiving services increased, without compromising service quality. Conclusions. Lessons learned are shared to facilitate development of other practice models to support children with DCD.
    Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Aims: Surveys have reported that most school-based physical therapists perceive ideal practices are not commonly implemented in their settings. Our aim was to obtain a more in-depth understanding of these perceptions through open-ended inquiry. Methods: Qualitative data were derived from voluntary open-ended responses provided upon completion of a survey regarding school-based physical therapy practice. Of the survey's 561 participants, 250 provided open-ended commentaries that were analyzed using interpretive phenomenology. Results: Six qualitative themes emerged from the open-ended responses, including: In quest: Meeting students’ school-based needs via physical therapy; Seeking relatedness: Finding working teams in the school system; Building understanding: Developing a voice/identity in the school context; Stretched beyond limits: Managing workloads; Networking: Coordinating services outside school to meet student needs; Defying definition: What does working in an educational model mean? Conclusions: School-based physical therapists seek to meet educationally relevant physical therapy needs of students, ages 3 to 21 years. Successes appear woven of a multitude of factors such as therapist expertise, team dynamics, and district supports.
    Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: ABSTRACT Aims: Children with coordination difficulties are at risk of low levels of physical activity (PA) participation. This intervention examined the effects of a multidisciplinary program that emphasized parent participation on motor skill performance and PA. Methods: Ten boys (5-7 years) completed a group program consisting of conditioning exercises and activities designed to address child-selected goals. Motor proficiency and PA participation were assessed before and after the program using the Test of Gross Motor Development (TGMD-2) and triaxial accelerometers, respectively. Rating scales captured child and parent perceptions of performance for each child's goals. Results: TGMD-2 subtest raw scores, age equivalent and percentile scores improved, along with parent ratings of their child's performance. Six children reported skill improvements. On average, moderate to vigorous PA improved by 10 min per day although these gains were not significant. Time spent in sedentary activities was unchanged. None of the children met the Canadian PA and sedentary behaviour guidelines. Conclusions: The results support effectiveness of a group program to improve gross motor performance and levels of PA in children with coordination difficulties. Gains in both of these domains also have the potential to impact quality of life and reduce health risks associated with inactivity.
    Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Aims: The primary objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of using posturography to monitor acute changes in postural control induced by a Sensory Integration (SI) therapy intervention. A secondary objective was to identify which posturography outcome parameters, tests conditions and data analysis methods might be most useful in identifying post-intervention changes. Methods: Five children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and five children with typical development (TD) participated in a 10 min vestibular swing activity and had their postural stability evaluated pre- and post-intervention under four different sensory testing conditions. Sway ranges, mean sway velocity, sway root mean square (RMS), and sample entropy were calculated from center of pressure (COP) data. Results: All five children with ASD demonstrated decreased mean sway velocity in the eyes open/flat plate condition post-intervention with an average decrease of 5.87 ± 2.69 mm/s. Four of the five children with ASD demonstrated an increase in RMS and a decrease in anterior/posterior sample entropy post-intervention in the eyes closed, foam pad condition and eyes open, flat plate condition respectively. Conclusion: Posturography may be useful for assessing acute physiologic responses to an SI therapy intervention and warrants further investigation.
    Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The Bimanual Fine Motor Function (BFMF) is currently the principal classification of hand function recorded by the Surveillance of Cerebral Palsy in Europe (SCPE) register. The BFMF is used in a number of epidemiological studies, but has not yet been validated. Aims: To examine aspects of construct and content validity of the BFMF. Methods and Results: Construct validity of the BFMF was assessed by comparison with the Manual Ability Classification System (MACS) using register-based data from 539 children born 1999–2003 (304 boys; 4–12 years). The high correlation with the MACS (Spearman's rho = 0.89, CI: 0.86–0.91, p<.001) supports construct validity of the BFMF. The content of the BFMF was appraised through literature review, and by using the ICF-CY as a framework to compare the BFMF and MACS. The items hold, grasp and manipulate were found to be relevant to describe increasingly advanced fine motor abilities in children with CP, but the description of the BFMF does not state whether it is a classification of fine motor capacity or performance. Conclusion: Our results suggest that the BFMF may provide complementary information to the MACS regarding fine motor function and actual use of the hands, particularly if used as a classification of fine motor capacity.
    Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: ABSTRACT Activities of daily living (ADL) of children are widely assessed with the Pediatric Evaluation Disability Inventory (PEDI). This study examined test-retest and inter-rater reliability of the German PEDI (PEDI-G). During the adaptation of the PEDI nine items were added. In total, 117 parents of 53 children without and 64 children with a diagnosed physical disability from Austria, Germany, and Switzerland participated. Reliability was examined by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), standard error of measurement (SEM) and smallest detectable difference (SDD) for the Functional Skill Scale with and without added items and the Caregiver Assistance Scale. Cohen`s Kappa was used to calculate the reliability of the Modification Scale. All ICC's for test-retest and inter-rater reliability were above 0.75, indicating good to very good reliability. The SDD varied from 0.83-5.58 across PEDI domains and scales. For the Modification Scale, Cohen's weighted kappa varied from 0.25 to 1.00 indicating sufficient reliability for some but not all items. Our findings indicate that the Functional Skill Scale and the Caregiver Assistance Scale of the PEDI-G are reliable scales that can be used to evaluate ADLs of children with and without physical disability.
    Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: ABSTRACT Families raising a young child with multiple disabilities are charged with significant responsibilities such as learning about their child's condition and navigating mainstream and alternative services. Aim: Describe service choices, costs, out of pocket expenses, and the impact on families. Methods: Survey design using a custom questionnaire was used to collect extensive retrospective and current data. Purposive sampling (N = 29) occurred from one early intervention facility specialized in servicing children with cerebral palsy (CP) and, or multiple disabilities in Australia. Descriptive statistics were used for analysis of data. Results: Twenty-three (79%) families reported caring for a child with CP. Twenty-three families reported using at least one complementary/alternative intervention. Out-of-pocket amounts were reported including: chiropractic services (10 families); naturopathy (9 families); point percussion therapy (7 families), and Chinese medicine (6 families). Expenses resulted in families reporting forgoing clothing items, family entertainment, recreation/hobbies for parents (55%); family holidays (59%); time for parents alone (66%); and health services for parents (38%). Conclusions: Families of young children with multiple disabilities select a wide range of services for their child, with consequential out of pocket expenses. Early intervention professionals can be an important resource for families as they evaluate their choices and select interventions for their child.
    Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics 11/2014;
  • Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Although not considered a diagnostic criterion in DSM-IV, motor difficulties in children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) are commonly reported. Prevalence of co-morbidity of ADHD and Developmental Coordination Disorder is as high as 50%. Cognitive Orientation to daily Occupational Performance (CO-OP) is a problem-solving approach originally developed for children with Developmental Coordination Disorder. In this approach, therapists support children to use cognitive strategies in a process of guided discovery to solve occupational performance problems. A single case experimental design (multiple baselines) was used to examine the influence of a 12-week intervention using CO-OP with six children with ADHD. Outcome measures included the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM), Goal Attainment Scaling and the Bruininks–Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency and Performance (BOTMP). The results of this study demonstrated improvements in both goals and motor performance in the participants due to the intervention. These results provide some support for the use of CO-OP with children with ADHD. Further research into the application of CO-OP with children with ADHD is warranted based on these preliminary positive findings regarding the efficacy of this intervention to address motor-based performance difficulties.
    Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: ABSTRACT Background: Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) affects the learning and performance of everyday motor skills. It commonly co-occurs with other developmental disorders and a range of associated psycho-social impairments. Recent evidence-based guidelines on diagnosis, assessment, and intervention provide valuable information for practitioners. However these are directed primarily at German-speaking countries and focus on work with children. Aim: The aim of this project was to consider the application of these guidelines in the UK and to extend them for use with adults with DCD. Methods: Individuals with DCD, parents, and professionals from a wide range of disciplines were invited to two workshops to discuss and debate the guidelines, to adapt them for the UK and produce dissemination materials. Results: A working definition of DCD was agreed, minor revisions were made to the guidelines to reflect the UK context, an extension for adults was compiled and a series of leaflets was produced to disseminate this information to health and education professionals, parents, and employers. Conclusions: This work will raise awareness of the condition across different professional groups. It provides information to help those working with children and adults with DCD in the UK to assist in the process of diagnosis, assessment, and intervention.
    Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: ABSTRACT Aims: The aim of this study was to assess and compare the content and measurement construct of a new measure, the Assessment of Preschool Children's Participation (APCP), with other participation measures that have previously been linked to the ICF-CY, and pilot the APCP item relevance in a Norwegian context. Methods: All meaningful concepts in the APCP were linked to the ICF-CY and compared with the links of eight other preschool measures. The analysis of measurement construct was based on the attending/doing and involvement/engagement dimensions of participation. The pilot study was a survey among 36 parents of typically developing children. Results: Like most measures, the APCP has a relatively high content intensity on recreation and play, but differs by excluding self-care activities and including some learning activities. All instruments use objective indicators to measure participation. The APCP was not among the few that assessed subjective aspects of participation. The APCP items were found highly relevant in a Norwegian context, with the exception of a few organized activities taking place outside home environments. Conclusions: Differences in content and measurement constructs and the cultural equivalence should be considered when selecting a participation instrument for use among preschool children.
    Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to examine which child and family characteristics at the child's age of 2 years are determinants of development of self-care and mobility activities over a period of 2 years in young children with cerebral palsy (CP). Longitudinal data of 92 children, representing all levels of the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS), were analyzed. Children's self-care and mobility activities were assessed with the Functional Skills Scale of the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory. Development of self-care and mobility activities was related to several child determinants but no family determinants. GMFCS, type of CP, intellectual capacity, and epilepsy were related to the development of self-care and mobility activities, while manual ability and spasticity were related to development of mobility activities. Multivariate analysis indicated that GMFCS and intellectual capacity were the strongest determinants of development of self-care activities, and GMFCS was the strongest determinant of development of mobility activities. The change in self-care and mobility activities was less favorable in severely affected children with severe disability. Knowledge of GMFCS level and intellectual capacity is important in anticipating change over time and goal setting in young children with CP.
    Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Developmental coordination disorder (DCD) significantly affects a child's motor abilities and negatively impacts their self-efficacy and participation in physical activity. Using a task-specific approach and cognitive strategies in a group setting, we designed a summer camp intervention for children with DCD. Aims: Our purpose was to examine the effectiveness of the summer camp in meeting child-chosen functional motor goals and increasing self-efficacy and participation. Methods: This mixed methods study examined performance and satisfaction of child-chosen goals, self-efficacy, and participation of 11 children before and after the camp. Survey and interview data from three children and nine parents were collected to supplement quantitative findings. Results: Statistically significant improvement in performance and satisfaction of child-chosen goals was noted. While no measureable changes in self-efficacy and participation were observed, parents and children reported positive benefits to camp participation, including the confidence to try new activities, being with other children with DCD, and learning more about the disorder. Conclusion: The intensive, group-based summer camp may offer a valuable alternative to improve the functional skills of children with DCD, while providing other notable benefits.
    Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Aims: Participation in family and recreational activities, self-care, and parent ease of caregiving are important outcomes for young children with cerebral palsy (CP). The aim of this study was to examine use of the Child Engagement in Daily Life and the Ease of Caregiving for Children to measure change over time. Methods: A convenience sample of 387 parents of young children with CP (18 months to 5 years of age) completed the measures twice, a mean of 12.7 months apart. Results: For the Child Engagement in Daily Life, parents of children in Gross Motor Function Classification System level I and levels II–III reported more change for the Self-care domain (medium effect) than the Family and Recreational Activities domain (small effect) and the Ease of Caregiving for Children (small effect). The change reported by parents of children in levels IV–V on all three measures was less than the criterion for a small effect. Minimal detectable change for each measure varied from 12.1 to 14.1, out of a total possible score of 100. Conclusion: Further research is recommended to determine responsiveness to change following intervention.
    Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics 08/2014;
  • Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: We examined the efficacy of modified constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) and hand-arm bimanual intensive therapy (HABIT) in a special education preschool/kindergarten in Israel. Twelve children (1.5–7 years) with congenital hemiplegic cerebral palsy were randomized to receive modified CIMT (n = 6) or HABIT (n = 6). Occupational and physical therapists administered usual and customary care for 8 weeks; children then crossed over to receive CIMT or HABIT 2 hr/day, 6 days/week for 8 weeks from their occupational therapist. The Assisting Hand Assessment and Quality of Upper Extremity Skills Test were administered 2 months prior to the intervention, immediately before, immediately after intervention, and 6 months after the first baseline assessment. Both groups demonstrated no change during baseline and comparable improvement following CIMT and HABIT (p < .001), which was maintained at 6-month follow-up. Results suggest that modified CIMT and HABIT provided in school-based settings can lead to improvements in quality of bimanual skill and movement patterns.
    Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: ABSTRACT The aims of this study were to explore physical therapists' beliefs about the value of walking for children with cerebral palsy (CP), how these beliefs inform therapy choices, and to describe how physical therapists engage families in decision-making regarding walking goals. Eight physical therapists who had experience working with children with CP each participated in a qualitative, one-to-one interview exploring their walking-related values, beliefs, and decision-making practices. The physical therapists' accounts demonstrated that they balanced their beliefs and professional expertise with families' goals in order to preserve families' hopes and maintain rapport, while also ensuring evidence-based and efficacious treatment plans were implemented. Participants experienced internal conflict when attempting to balance the principles of family-centered care with their personal beliefs and expertise. Further research will augment these findings and contribute to ongoing debates regarding rehabilitation best practices and family-centered care.
    Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: ABSTRACT Aims: According to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child article 12, children have a right to express their views. However, knowledge on how children with a disability perceive this right and the extent to which they would like to access this right is unclear. The aim of this study was to describe and capture the meaning of children's perspective on their right to participate in decision-making together with the children's lived experiences in pediatric rehabilitation. Methods: A phenomenological hermeneutical research design was applied for gathering the thoughts and lived experiences of seven children with different disabilities through individual interviews and observations. Results: The children expressed satisfaction with participation being limited to less important decisions. This may be understood as lack of experience with participation in decision-making or an inherent wish of becoming like peers and therefore viewing therapists as experts of a normalization process. Conclusions: Health care professionals should consider informing the child of the possibility of decision-making and for negotiating power-sharing and responsibility concerning decisions in pediatric rehabilitation.
    Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics 05/2014;