Journal of Plant Nutrition (J PLANT NUTR )

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Description

This authoritative journal serves as a comprehensive, convenient source of new and important findings exploring the influence of currently known essential and nonessential elements on plant physiology and growth - offering prompt publication of outstanding original research and review papers in this vital area of plant and soil science. Includes special symposium issues that focus on essential nutrients, heavy metals, and trace elements! Refereed by an internationally renowned editorial board ensuring the high level of scholarship, the Journal of Plant Nutrition provides insightful coverage of nutritional topics, such as hydroponics nutrient requirements for greenhouse crops container production media analysis of pine bark, peat, and artificial media floriculture production vegetable crop production fruit crop production ornamental production tropical crops foliage plants agronomic crops forestry and much more!

  • Impact factor
    0.53
    Show impact factor history
     
    Impact factor
  • 5-year impact
    0.85
  • Cited half-life
    0.00
  • Immediacy index
    0.08
  • Eigenfactor
    0.00
  • Article influence
    0.21
  • Website
    Journal of Plant Nutrition website
  • Other titles
    Journal of plant nutrition (Online), Journal of plant nutrition
  • ISSN
    0190-4167
  • OCLC
    50775705
  • Material type
    Document, Periodical, Internet resource
  • Document type
    Internet Resource, Computer File, Journal / Magazine / Newspaper

Publisher details

Taylor & Francis

  • Pre-print
    • Author can archive a pre-print version
  • Post-print
    • Author cannot archive a post-print version
  • Restrictions
    • 12 month embargo for STM, Behavioural Science and Public Health Journals
    • 18 month embargo for SSH journals
  • Conditions
    • Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving
    • Pre-print on authors own website, Institutional or Subject Repository
    • Post-print on authors own website, Institutional or Subject Repository
    • Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
    • On a non-profit server
    • Published source must be acknowledged
    • Must link to publisher version
    • Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy)
    • Publisher will deposit to PMC on behalf of NIH authors.
    • STM: Science, Technology and Medicine
    • SSH: Social Science and Humanities
    • 'Taylor & Francis (Psychology Press)' is an imprint of 'Taylor & Francis'
  • Classification
    ​ yellow

Publications in this journal

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of the study was to examine effect of foliar titanium (Ti) application on vigor, fruiting, and quality and fruit storability of apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) trees. The experiment was carried out during 2000–2001 on mature “Szampion” apple trees/M.26 planted in a course-textured soil with a low level of organic matter and optimal status of nutrients. The trees were sprayed with TiCl4 solution: (1) before blooming, at the stage of green and pink bud; (2) during blooming, at the beginning of flowering and the petal fall; (3) after blooming, 1 and 3 weeks after petal fall; and (4) before fruit picking, 4 and 2 weeks before commercial harvest. In each spray, Ti was applied at a rate of 2.5 g ha. Trees sprayed with water served as a control. The results showed that foliar Ti sprays had no effect on vigor, fruit set, yielding, and appearance and apple storability. Foliar Ti application after flowering increased leaf Ti 30, 60, and 90 days after full bloom. Titanium sprays before harvest enhanced status of this element in fruit and leaves 90 days after bloom. Concentrations of essential macro- and microelements in leaf and fruit tissues were not affected by foliar Ti sprays. These results indicate that foliar Ti sprays of apple trees are not beneficial under conditions of optimal nutrition.
    Journal of Plant Nutrition 01/2033; 27(11):2033-2046.
  • Journal of Plant Nutrition 01/2019; 27(11):2019-2032.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are soil bacteria with some beneficial effects on soil properties, plant growth and the environment. In this article, some of the most important advancements in the field of PGPR and their related properties are presented. Such knowledge can be important for understanding regarding the use of PGPR for different uses such as biological fertilization and alleviation of different stresses on plant growth and the environment.
    Journal of Plant Nutrition 12/2014; 37(14).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The present research was conducted to evaluate the effects of salinized water with boron and sodium chloride (NaCl) on seed germination of basil and cress. Treatments were: boron solution (25 and 50 mM), NaCl solution (25 and 50 mM) and distilled water as control. The highest germination percentage and mean daily germination of both plants were obtained in boron 25 mM. The highest mean germination time of basil and the day of 50% emergence of basil and cress were found in boron 50 mM. Radicle length of basil was reduced by increment of all salinity treatments; however, the highest cress radicle length was observed in 50 mM NaCl. It is concluded that these plants can tolerate salinized water during the germination stage to some extent, however, the cress show more tolerance to these salinities than basil.
    Journal of Plant Nutrition 12/2014; 37(14).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A hydroponic culture was used to study different nitrogen and calcium supply patterns on biomass, nutritive, and safety quality of spinach seven days before harvesting. The results showed that the complete or partial withdrawal of nitrogen (N) and calcium (Ca) nutrient decreased spinach biomass compared to control (CK). At the same time, the withdrawal of N and Ca supply before harvesting increased vitamin C contents and decreased nitrate and oxalate content in edible parts of spinach. The decrease in spinach biomass could be partially compensated by the increase of the nutritive and safety quality of spinach and the reduced use of N and Ca nutrients.
    Journal of Plant Nutrition 12/2014; 37(14).
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    ABSTRACT: A field experiment was conducted on Indian mustard (Brassica juncea) with five levels of sulfur (S), 0, 15, 30, 45, and 60 kg S ha−1 in sub-tropical Inceptisol of Jammu, North India. The residual effect of S on rice crop was evaluated. The seed and stover yield of mustard increased in the linear order up to 60 kg S ha−1 but significant yield increase was obtained up to 30 S kg ha−1 which was 21.4 percent higher in comparison to the yield obtained in control. The uptake of S at maturity was significantly affected with all the levels of S application. The seed S uptake increased significantly up to 30 kg S ha−1 and stover 45 kg S ha−1. The residual effect of S was convincing in enhancing the rice yield to the tune of 5.3% over control, but was statistically non-significant. The S uptake was also favourably influenced by the residual S which was evidenced through increased S use efficiency. Agronomic and physiological efficiency as well as S recovery were all greatly influenced by direct and residual effect of S. Apparent S recovery was higher at 30 kg S ha−1 in mustard (12.06%).
    Journal of Plant Nutrition 12/2014; 37(14).
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    ABSTRACT: An aquaponic system was designed to investigate the effects of foliar applications of potassium (K) on mint, radish, parsley, and coriander growth and physiological characteristics. Plants were sprayed with 100 mL pot−1 of 0.5 g L−1 potassium sulfate (K2SO4) twice a week. Fresh and dry masses of shoot in all species were higher in K-treated plants. Potassium concentration increased with K spray in the shoots of all species. K-sprayed parsley accumulated a greater amount of Fe and chlorophyll in shoots. Values of SPAD index in all species decreased significantly in untreated plants. The highest Quantum Photosynthetic Yield (Fv/Fm) values were observed in coriander plants treated with K, which was attributed to higher SPAD value in these plants. Potassium application had a negative effect on sodium (Na) and positive effect on magnesium (Mg), manganese (Mn), and zinc (Zn) concentrations in plants. These results indicated that foliar spray of K can effectively alleviate nutrient deficiencies in leafy and root vegetables grown in aquaponics.
    Journal of Plant Nutrition 12/2014; 37(14).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Increased alkalinity caused reduction in growth of Jatropha Curcas plant. This experiment was designed to test the efficacy of beneficial microbes and vermicompost individually and in combinations to alleviate the stressful effect of alkaline stress on growth of Jatropha. Plants inoculated with bacterial consortia had significantly increase in vegetative growth parameters. Soil analysis showed increase in total organic carbon (TOC) by 68% compared to soil before plantation treated with Bacterial consortia + vermicompost. Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) content in the soil was increased by 25% and 84% before plantation treated with Bacterial consortia. Maximum uptake of potassium (K) and sodium (Na) content was observed in consortia. Plant analysis showed that consortia could increase uptake of micronutrients compared to control and other treatments. It can be concluded that multispecies bacterial consortia alone or in combination with mycorrhiza and vermicompost can reduce alkaline stress and enhances the seed germination potential, vegetative growth, and nutrient status of soil.
    Journal of Plant Nutrition 12/2014; 37(14).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Inoculation of wheat and corn grains with formulations of Azospirillum brasilense significantly increased seedling growth parameters of wheat and corn compared to untreated controls. Inoculation with Azospirillum and supplemental Trichoderma harzianum free or coimmobilized in calcium alginate resulted in significant increase in all plant growth parameters in addition to improving plant nutrient-content [phosphorus (P), potassium (K), and calcium (Ca)]. Grain treatments with T. harzianum alone or in a combination with A. brasilense were protected from invasion by Fusarium in a pot experiment. Nitrogen (N) fixation was investigated by A. brasilense free or double inoculated with T. harzianum in soil amended with different C-sources; also, phosphate solubilization was tested by these two organisms. Single and double inoculation with A. brasilense and/or T. harzianum improved wheat yield growth parameters in addition to seed protein; therefore, immobilized and coimmobilized formulations could be used as biofertilizer and biopesticide, and might be recommended to avoid the extensive use of the agrochemicals.
    Journal of Plant Nutrition 10/2014; 37(12).
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    ABSTRACT: The main aim of this research work is to prepare an enriched compost using rice straw mixed with rock phosphate, waste mica and Aspergillus awamori and to study their effect on changes in microbial properties in soils with and without chemical fertilizers under wheat-soybean rotation. Data revealed that significant increase in microbial biomass carbon (MBC), dehydrogenase activity, phosphatase activities, and microbial biomass phosphorus (MBP) in soil were maintained in enriched compost than ordinary compost after both the crops. Significant increase in MBC, dehydrogenase activity, phosphatase activities, and MBP were found in surface soil. The maximum microbial activities were observed in the treatment receiving 50% recommended dose of fertilizer (RDF) + enriched compost at 5 t ha−1 indicating that integrated use of chemical fertilizers and enriched compost significantly improved the biological properties of soil under wheat–soybean rotation thereby enhanced soil fertility and crop production.
    Journal of Plant Nutrition 10/2014; 37(12).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Nitrogen (N) is often applied to first year maize (Zea mays L.) after alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) at rates greater than needed to attain maximum yields. This study explored other potential benefits of excess N fertilizer applications to maize after alfalfa. Effects of N fertilizer (no N fertilizer, 73, or 135 kg N ha−1) to maize after alfalfa on stalk dry weight, stalk mineral concentrations [N, phosphorus (P), and potassium (K)], grain yield, and kernel components (protein, oil, starch, P, and K) were investigated. Fertilizer N increased stalk N concentration but not stalk dry weight. Grain yields and yields of protein, oil, starch, P, and K kernel components, expressed on a kg ha−1 basis, were also unaffected by N fertilizer treatments. Thus, there appears to be no advantage, in terms of yield or kernel components, in applying N fertilizer to maize after alfalfa under the environments experienced during this two year field experiment.
    Journal of Plant Nutrition 10/2014; 37(12).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Dry bean is an important legume worldwide, and potassium (K) deficiency is one of the important constraints for bean production in most of the bean growing regions. A greenhouse experiment was conducted with the objective to evaluate fifteen dry bean genotypes grown on a Brazilian lowland (Inceptisol) United States Soil Taxonomy classification and Gley humic Brazilian Soil Classification system), locally known as “Varzea” soil. The K rate used was 0 mg kg−1 (low, natural soil level) and 200 mg kg−1 (high, applied as fertilizer). Straw yield, seed yield, pods per plant, seeds per pod, 100 seed weight, and seed harvest index were significantly increased with the addition of K fertilizer. These traits were also significantly influenced by genotypic treatment. Similarly, root length and root dry weight were also influenced significantly by K and genotype treatments. The K X genotype interactions for most of these traits were also significant, indicating variation in these traits with the variation in K level. Based on seed yield efficiency index (SYEI), genotypes were classified as efficient, moderately efficient, and inefficient in K use efficiency. Maximum grain yield was obtained with 74 mg K kg−1 extracted by Mehlich 1 extracting solution. Similarly, K saturation required for maximum grain yield was 1.1%.
    Journal of Plant Nutrition 10/2014; 37(12).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Essential oil quality, quantity, and antioxidant capacity of foliar fertilized Matricaria recutita L., grown on industrially polluted with cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) soil were studied. The polluted field is near the waste depository of ferrous metallurgical combine “Kremikovci”. Content of Cd and Pb in the soil exceeded permissible concentrations 4.6 and 2.0 times, respectively. The presence of high levels of heavy metals in the soil resulted in retained plant growth. In M. recutita grown on industrially polluted soil, a decrease of root and shoot dry biomass and reduction of number of lateral steams was observed. Otherwise, the number and biomass of flowers per plant increased. Antioxidant defense in the foliar fertilized plants grown on industrially polluted soil could due mainly to increased levels of peroxidases with substrates ascorbate, glutathione, guaiacol, and hydrogen peroxide. Enhanced levels of Cd and Pb in soil did not influence essential oil yield and quality of chamomile.
    Journal of Plant Nutrition 10/2014; 37(12).
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    ABSTRACT: In order to study the effects of salinity and water stress on growth and macronutrients concentration of pomegranate plant leaves, a factorial experiment was conducted based on completely randomized design with 0, 30, and 60 mM of salinity levels of sodium chloride and calcium chloride (1:1) and three irrigation intervals (2, 4, and 6 days) with 3 replications on ‘Rabab’ and ‘Shishegap’ cultivars of pomegranate. The results of the shoot and root analysis indicated that the salinity and drought affected the concentration and distribution of sodium (Na+), potassium (K+), chloride (Cl−), calcium (Ca2+), magnesium (Mg2+), and phosphorus (P+) in pomegranate leaves. Mineral concentrations of sodium (Na+), chloride (Cl-), potassium (K+), in shoots and roots were increased with increasing salinity. Drought treatments increased the concentration of Cl−, Na+, and Mg2+ in the shoot. Both cultivars showed significant differences in the concentrations of elements, however the most accumulation of Na+ and Cl− was observed in ‘Rabab,’ while the ‘Shishegap’ cultivar had the most absorption of K+. ‘Shishegap’ cultivar showed higher tolerance to salinity than ‘Rabab’ through maintaining the vegetative growth and lower chloride transport to the shoot, and improvement of potassium transport to shoot.
    Journal of Plant Nutrition 10/2014; 37(12).
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    ABSTRACT: This study evaluated fertilizer contribution of municipal wastewater on potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) cultivation in a split-plot experiment having two factors: water quality with 5 levels and fertilizer with 2 levels. Irrigation by raw wastewater supplied 16, 13, 13, 23, 1.7, and 83% of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), potassium (K), sulfur (S), zinc (Zn), and boron (B) requirement of potato, respectively. Wastewater compared to freshwater, improved plant height, vigority, area coverage, leaf area index (LAI), stem per plant, number and weight of tuber per plant, above-ground dry matter (ADM), and tuber yield of potato. Averaged over 3 years, irrigation by 75 and 100% (raw) wastewater with recommended standard fertilizers produced the maximum, but identical, tuber yield. Wastewater raised N, P, and K contents in potato plants and tubers. Irrigation by wastewater could reduce the fertilizer requirement of potato by 10–15%. However, it caused high accumulation of total coliform (TC) and faecal coliform (FC) on potato skin, restricting the use of the produce.
    Journal of Plant Nutrition 10/2014; 37(12).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Today, environmental protection and safe crop production are very important. The management of soil elements by compost is considered as important for sustainable agriculture. The mode of action of the composts is very different between various plant species. To evaluate the effects of different composts on soil structural and chemical properties and on morphological traits of two dry rangeland species (atriplex; Atriplex lentiformis and mesquite; Prosopos juliflora), a study was conducted in Fars Province of Iran during the year 2010. The study was a factorial experiment based on a randomized complete block design with three replications. Treatments included compost types: solid (SC) and liquid compost or compost tea (LC), solid-liquid mixture (XSL) and control (Con; non used compost) as the first factor, and two pasture plant species as the second factor. The results showed that the compost application had significant and positive effects on morphological traits such as plant height, stem diameter, plant volume, crown length, width, and area, and caused 15, 51.18, 70.67, 34.18, 18.35, and 64.94% increase on these morphological traits, respectively. Although soil acidity was not significantly affected by compost and species, the effects of compost were significant on organic matter percentage, soil phosphorous, and potassium contents. Soil nitrogen percentage was affected by both species and compost. Compost application caused a decrease in the amount of sodium compared with the control. Overall, the results of this study suggested that within the compost types, liquid compost was an advisable biofertilizer in a similar climate. Furthermore, the LC and the XSL are recommended for improving the morphological traits and the soil characteristics, respectively.
    Journal of Plant Nutrition 10/2014; 37(12).
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    ABSTRACT: Fertigation offers vast potential for efficient use of water and nutrients in sustainable orchard management. Beside minimizing losses, their distribution within the rhizosphere is of utmost importance. In present investigations, most of feeder roots were observed within 30 cm soil depth. Under drip fertigation, wetting front extended horizontally up to 45 cm from emitter. However, the maximum moisture content remained confined within 30 cm distance. Vertically, soil moisture also remained higher in the 0–30 cm soil layers. Under surface irrigation, deeper soil layers registered higher moisture content. Available nitrogen (N) and potassium (K) under fertigation closely followed the moisture distribution pattern. Fertigation plus mulch resulted in 20% fertilizer and 15% water savings over fertigation without mulch. Beside 33% higher fruit yield and 25% water savings, and fertigation plus mulch resulted in 20 percent fertilizer and 40% water savings over surface irrigation.
    Journal of Plant Nutrition 10/2014; 37(12).

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